Transfer LLM to JD?


aalba
Would it be possible to transfer from a LLM program to JD? Is it affordable? I am an american citizen moving back to the US, specifically NYC. I hold a law degree in Dominican Republic. Language spanish, civil law system (mostly influenced by french law). Should i find job in NYC? Since a JD it's an option, do i have any chance transfering into this program after i get admitted in a LLM? I graduated in 2008.
Would it be possible to transfer from a LLM program to JD? Is it affordable? I am an american citizen moving back to the US, specifically NYC. I hold a law degree in Dominican Republic. Language spanish, civil law system (mostly influenced by french law). Should i find job in NYC? Since a JD it's an option, do i have any chance transfering into this program after i get admitted in a LLM? I graduated in 2008.
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zakatala
This is very interesting question. If anybody has any information about this could you please share?
This is very interesting question. If anybody has any information about this could you please share?
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Jackross
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Hedek
At the few schools where it is permitted, a very high GPA (typically >3.8) during your LL.M year is required, which is no small feat.

Even if transfer is granted, you'd still have to spend 3 years in law school to get your JD. And you will not be awarded an LL.M degree even though you've completed all its requirements.

Is the LSAT really not an option? In the end, the question comes down to what's more doable for you: a 3.8 LL.M GPA or 168+ LSAT?
Also, if you're a URM (underrepresented minority: mexican, african american, or native american) the LSAT score you need is even lower and in most cases much easier to get than a 3.8 LL.M GPA.
You should also take into account financial aids, a very high LSAT score grants scholarships (up to $70k/yr). A very high LL.M GPA will only get you into L2.
At the few schools where it is permitted, a very high GPA (typically >3.8) during your LL.M year is required, which is no small feat.

Even if transfer is granted, you'd still have to spend 3 years in law school to get your JD. And you will not be awarded an LL.M degree even though you've completed all its requirements.

Is the LSAT really not an option? In the end, the question comes down to what's more doable for you: a 3.8 LL.M GPA or 168+ LSAT?
Also, if you're a URM (underrepresented minority: mexican, african american, or native american) the LSAT score you need is even lower and in most cases much easier to get than a 3.8 LL.M GPA.
You should also take into account financial aids, a very high LSAT score grants scholarships (up to $70k/yr). A very high LL.M GPA will only get you into L2.
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