Top tier LLM/Lower tier JD?


Hey guys,
I'm currently in my last year of law school- the problem is I'm studying for a 'licence' (bachelor's degree) in French law and I'm an American looking to practice in the US later on (yes, I know I should've done my research 3 years ago...). I'm applying to a few LLM programs here and there, mostly at T-14 schools, but recently I've come across a two-year JD program for international lawyers offered at Arizona Law. Tuition is only $29,000 and I'm seriously considering this option as I'm aware that JDs hold a lot more weight than LLMs when it comes to employment in the US. Also if I do opt for the JD I'd be paying the same if not less total tuition than that of the LLM.
The only issue here is I know UA isn't in the top tier of law schools and I feel like I have a chance of getting into better schools by applying to LLM programs (I know there's always the possibility of transferring after my 1st year). Is there some sort of consensus on what is better for job prospects, a JD from a lower tier school or an LLM from a top tier school (eg Michigan, Duke, etc)? Thanks!

[Edited by confusedsusan on Feb 17, 2018]

Hey guys,
I'm currently in my last year of law school- the problem is I'm studying for a 'licence' (bachelor's degree) in French law and I'm an American looking to practice in the US later on (yes, I know I should've done my research 3 years ago...). I'm applying to a few LLM programs here and there, mostly at T-14 schools, but recently I've come across a two-year JD program for international lawyers offered at Arizona Law. Tuition is only $29,000 and I'm seriously considering this option as I'm aware that JDs hold a lot more weight than LLMs when it comes to employment in the US. Also if I do opt for the JD I'd be paying the same if not less total tuition than that of the LLM.
The only issue here is I know UA isn't in the top tier of law schools and I feel like I have a chance of getting into better schools by applying to LLM programs (I know there's always the possibility of transferring after my 1st year). Is there some sort of consensus on what is better for job prospects, a JD from a lower tier school or an LLM from a top tier school (eg Michigan, Duke, etc)? Thanks!
quote
MV20178
Hey guys,
I'm currently in my last year of law school- the problem is I'm studying for a 'licence' (bachelor's degree) in French law and I'm an American looking to practice in the US later on (yes, I know I should've done my research 3 years ago...). I'm applying to a few LLM programs here and there, mostly at T-14 schools, but recently I've come across a two-year JD program for international lawyers offered at Arizona Law. Tuition is only $29,000 and I'm seriously considering this option as I'm aware that JDs hold a lot more weight than LLMs when it comes to employment in the US. Also if I do opt for the JD I'd be paying the same if not less total tuition than that of the LLM.
The only issue here is I know UA isn't in the top tier of law schools and I feel like I have a chance of getting into better schools by applying to LLM programs (I know there's always the possibility of transferring after my 1st year). Is there some sort of consensus on what is better for job prospects, a JD from a lower tier school or an LLM from a top tier school (eg Michigan, Duke, etc)? Thanks!


There are a few other things that, imo, you should consider.
First, a LLM would only let you sit for a few selected Bar Exams (Most notably: NY, CA and TX), whereas a JD would allow you to sit for any US Bar (as long as your JD was issued by a ABA creditated school). Obviously, a JD opens a lot of other jurisdictions that would be normally closed for a LLM holder.

While we are in this matter, i think the Northwestern Uni. has a 2 Year JD Program as well.. This check both your boxes i guess, since it is a JD from a T14 school. I'm not sure about the price though.

On the other hand, a LLM from a more prestigious law school, (Stanford, Harvard, Yale or Columbia), may be a faster way to secure a attorney's license, if you are planning to practice in NY/TX/CA. The Uni's name will open a few doors for you, but there will always be the ol'stigma of "not being" an US teached lawyer.

At the end of the day, both are paths to the same end. It is up to you select which one fits better in your career goals.

BUT, if you a) can pay, and b) are willing to wait, why not consider a normal, 3 year, complete JD program?
[quote]Hey guys,
I'm currently in my last year of law school- the problem is I'm studying for a 'licence' (bachelor's degree) in French law and I'm an American looking to practice in the US later on (yes, I know I should've done my research 3 years ago...). I'm applying to a few LLM programs here and there, mostly at T-14 schools, but recently I've come across a two-year JD program for international lawyers offered at Arizona Law. Tuition is only $29,000 and I'm seriously considering this option as I'm aware that JDs hold a lot more weight than LLMs when it comes to employment in the US. Also if I do opt for the JD I'd be paying the same if not less total tuition than that of the LLM.
The only issue here is I know UA isn't in the top tier of law schools and I feel like I have a chance of getting into better schools by applying to LLM programs (I know there's always the possibility of transferring after my 1st year). Is there some sort of consensus on what is better for job prospects, a JD from a lower tier school or an LLM from a top tier school (eg Michigan, Duke, etc)? Thanks![/quote]

There are a few other things that, imo, you should consider.
First, a LLM would only let you sit for a few selected Bar Exams (Most notably: NY, CA and TX), whereas a JD would allow you to sit for any US Bar (as long as your JD was issued by a ABA creditated school). Obviously, a JD opens a lot of other jurisdictions that would be normally closed for a LLM holder.

While we are in this matter, i think the Northwestern Uni. has a 2 Year JD Program as well.. This check both your boxes i guess, since it is a JD from a T14 school. I'm not sure about the price though.

On the other hand, a LLM from a more prestigious law school, (Stanford, Harvard, Yale or Columbia), may be a faster way to secure a attorney's license, if you are planning to practice in NY/TX/CA. The Uni's name will open a few doors for you, but there will always be the ol'stigma of "not being" an US teached lawyer.

At the end of the day, both are paths to the same end. It is up to you select which one fits better in your career goals.

BUT, if you a) can pay, and b) are willing to wait, why not consider a normal, 3 year, complete JD program?
quote
Duncan
Worth reading: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/26/business/dealbook/the-2-year-law-education-fails-to-take-off.html
Worth reading: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/26/business/dealbook/the-2-year-law-education-fails-to-take-off.html
quote

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