Securities Law


jctex
Does anyone know of an LLM program that is specific to Securities Law? I've searched on this site, but it appears most programs deal with banking or finance which is a wider scope than I'd like. Specifically, I am interested in learning about SEC regulations, rules and polices, and any causes of action or defenses that may arise as a result of same. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Does anyone know of an LLM program that is specific to Securities Law? I've searched on this site, but it appears most programs deal with banking or finance which is a wider scope than I'd like. Specifically, I am interested in learning about SEC regulations, rules and polices, and any causes of action or defenses that may arise as a result of same. Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Varnieri
Hi jctex,

Georgetown has a LLM program specific in securities law and financial regulation. Take a look at their website.
Cheers!
Hi jctex,

Georgetown has a LLM program specific in securities law and financial regulation. Take a look at their website.
Cheers!
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Jazzman
I don't know if you are interested in UK programmes, but both UCL and Queen Mary (University of London) offer securities and financial regulation courses.
I don't know if you are interested in UK programmes, but both UCL and Queen Mary (University of London) offer securities and financial regulation courses.
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jctex
Thanks Varnieri and Jazzman. You've both been helpful. Yes, I'm interested in studying overseas. In fact, I'd probably prefer it at this point. I have 2 years of litigation experience, and have learned a fair amount of securities law. The main problem for me is that my grades weren't too spectacular in law school. I know it would be very difficult to get into Georgetown, but do you have any information on acceptance to UK programs? I know there are some very prestigious legal education programs in the UK, but how are job prospects in US and Europe after graduating from a UK program? Thanks again for your help.
Thanks Varnieri and Jazzman. You've both been helpful. Yes, I'm interested in studying overseas. In fact, I'd probably prefer it at this point. I have 2 years of litigation experience, and have learned a fair amount of securities law. The main problem for me is that my grades weren't too spectacular in law school. I know it would be very difficult to get into Georgetown, but do you have any information on acceptance to UK programs? I know there are some very prestigious legal education programs in the UK, but how are job prospects in US and Europe after graduating from a UK program? Thanks again for your help.
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Jazzman
Well I got in to UCL with a 57% average - I think maybe a GPA of 3.0 equivalent. If I were you I would try an application for LSE, UCL and QMUL. All of these colleges have a good record for securities law. It is generally accepted that LSE has the strongest reputation in the US. However, in the UK it would probably be UCL.

Thanks Varnieri and Jazzman. You've both been helpful. Yes, I'm interested in studying overseas. In fact, I'd probably prefer it at this point. I have 2 years of litigation experience, and have learned a fair amount of securities law. The main problem for me is that my grades weren't too spectacular in law school. I know it would be very difficult to get into Georgetown, but do you have any information on acceptance to UK programs? I know there are some very prestigious legal education programs in the UK, but how are job prospects in US and Europe after graduating from a UK program? Thanks again for your help.
Well I got in to UCL with a 57% average - I think maybe a GPA of 3.0 equivalent. If I were you I would try an application for LSE, UCL and QMUL. All of these colleges have a good record for securities law. It is generally accepted that LSE has the strongest reputation in the US. However, in the UK it would probably be UCL.

<blockquote>Thanks Varnieri and Jazzman. You've both been helpful. Yes, I'm interested in studying overseas. In fact, I'd probably prefer it at this point. I have 2 years of litigation experience, and have learned a fair amount of securities law. The main problem for me is that my grades weren't too spectacular in law school. I know it would be very difficult to get into Georgetown, but do you have any information on acceptance to UK programs? I know there are some very prestigious legal education programs in the UK, but how are job prospects in US and Europe after graduating from a UK program? Thanks again for your help.</blockquote>
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munipoka
hi to all discussing courses in securities law. i too am interested in pursuing my LLM in US securities law. i would love to couple it up with some courses in business. i have heard that wharton business school provides courses for securities law and also credit courses for business. would you guys be knowing of the same and how to go about it?

also i believe that u guys say that geaogetown in very good for securities law. any other suggestions?

thanx for your help in advance.
hi to all discussing courses in securities law. i too am interested in pursuing my LLM in US securities law. i would love to couple it up with some courses in business. i have heard that wharton business school provides courses for securities law and also credit courses for business. would you guys be knowing of the same and how to go about it?

also i believe that u guys say that geaogetown in very good for securities law. any other suggestions?

thanx for your help in advance.
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Varnieri
Hi munipoka,
I wish i could give you more information about securities law programs in the US. Georgetown indeed has a good LLM program about it, but I am sure there are other law schools that have great courses in securities as well. As to your question about wharton business school, I am certain that a current student at UPenn can provide you more accurate information. As far as I know, if your attending the LLM at UPenn you may take some credits in wharton business school. I hope i have helped you.
Regards.
Hi munipoka,
I wish i could give you more information about securities law programs in the US. Georgetown indeed has a good LLM program about it, but I am sure there are other law schools that have great courses in securities as well. As to your question about wharton business school, I am certain that a current student at UPenn can provide you more accurate information. As far as I know, if your attending the LLM at UPenn you may take some credits in wharton business school. I hope i have helped you.
Regards.
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munipoka
hey Varnieri, thanx for ur response. will try getting in touch with students from Upenn. wud u b knowing any from there who u cud mayb put me in touch with for specifics? thanx so much again for ur help.
hey Varnieri, thanx for ur response. will try getting in touch with students from Upenn. wud u b knowing any from there who u cud mayb put me in touch with for specifics? thanx so much again for ur help.
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SCHORSCH
Yes, you can take a couple of Wharton courses while at PennLaw. The good ones are bit difficult to get in sometimes, but it is certainly an option. If you are interested in Securities, I can recommend PennLaw regardless of the Wharton courses. Professor Tyson teaches Securities Regulation -- his class is very challenging, but one of the best courses taught over there.
Yes, you can take a couple of Wharton courses while at PennLaw. The good ones are bit difficult to get in sometimes, but it is certainly an option. If you are interested in Securities, I can recommend PennLaw regardless of the Wharton courses. Professor Tyson teaches Securities Regulation -- his class is very challenging, but one of the best courses taught over there.
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drums2345
As a current student at the Georgetown University Law Center seeking an LLM in Securities and Financial Regulation, I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in pursuing a career in either securities or financial regulation. Quite frankly, I believe those professionals without an LLM in this area of specialty will be at a disadvantage due to the complexity and comprehensiveness of these fields of law.

In the current market, lawyers need every advantage they can find and they need to avoid any gaps on their resume. Hence, this LLM may be very helpful. Further, law firms now do not want to pay for the training of their associates and would rather have an associate that can hit the ground running.

In addition to the highly competent and qualified teaching (the best in their fields) and connections with all of the various regulators in DC creating an ideal and cutting edge learning environment, the connections and ability to gain experience at the regulators through the program (e.g., SEC, Treasury, OCC, FDIC, FERC, CFTC, etc.) are excellent. For the reasons stated above, and many others not stated, Georgetown University Law Center's LLM Program in Securities and Financial Regulation is probably the best program of its kind within the United States.
Although there are schools like Harvard, Columbia, etc. these schools, in this area of the law, are not in DC. Why is this important? Washington D.C. is the center of all financial regulation within the US and the center of all legal reforms in the areas of securities and banking law. When your professors walk (or take the Metro) directly from their highest ranking positions in Big Law or at the SEC, OCC, FDIC, CFTC, FERC, Treasury, FINRA etc. (most of whom have also previously worked in Big Law) you become the possible recipient of the best connections possible and are learning the most current and relevant information possible. Although much of the world still says "Wow!" when you say you went to Harvard, at the end of the day it comes down to what you know, who you know, and how well you can utilize these two things in your career.

The current legal market in the United States is probably and hopefully the worst those reading this will ever experience. Also, we should be out of this mess within a few years. Hereafter, things will get better for us all. Now is a good time to be obtaining an LLM in an area of the law that interests you and that will serve to connect you to many future employers. My recommendation is if you have a job then keep it and do the LLM part-time. If you dont have a job and cant find one, then seriously consider getting your LLM (full-time or part-time) from the best school possible in that particular area of the law because in the future this may be a new unspoken requirement in many fields of law such as securities and banking law. Please do not forget some important facts: 1) the law and the legal profession are both becoming more specialized and more complex; and 2) most employers today would rather hire someone that already has a strong foundation in their chosen field than to have to pay for and take valuable time to train that lawyer. Also, the proliferation of LLM programs is changing the landscape of the legal profession and upping the ante as they say in poker.
As a current student at the Georgetown University Law Center seeking an LLM in Securities and Financial Regulation, I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in pursuing a career in either securities or financial regulation. Quite frankly, I believe those professionals without an LLM in this area of specialty will be at a disadvantage due to the complexity and comprehensiveness of these fields of law.

In the current market, lawyers need every advantage they can find and they need to avoid any gaps on their resume. Hence, this LLM may be very helpful. Further, law firms now do not want to pay for the training of their associates and would rather have an associate that can hit the ground running.

In addition to the highly competent and qualified teaching (the best in their fields) and connections with all of the various regulators in DC creating an ideal and cutting edge learning environment, the connections and ability to gain experience at the regulators through the program (e.g., SEC, Treasury, OCC, FDIC, FERC, CFTC, etc.) are excellent. For the reasons stated above, and many others not stated, Georgetown University Law Center's LLM Program in Securities and Financial Regulation is probably the best program of its kind within the United States.
Although there are schools like Harvard, Columbia, etc. these schools, in this area of the law, are not in DC. Why is this important? Washington D.C. is the center of all financial regulation within the US and the center of all legal reforms in the areas of securities and banking law. When your professors walk (or take the Metro) directly from their highest ranking positions in Big Law or at the SEC, OCC, FDIC, CFTC, FERC, Treasury, FINRA etc. (most of whom have also previously worked in Big Law) you become the possible recipient of the best connections possible and are learning the most current and relevant information possible. Although much of the world still says "Wow!" when you say you went to Harvard, at the end of the day it comes down to what you know, who you know, and how well you can utilize these two things in your career.

The current legal market in the United States is probably and hopefully the worst those reading this will ever experience. Also, we should be out of this mess within a few years. Hereafter, things will get better for us all. Now is a good time to be obtaining an LLM in an area of the law that interests you and that will serve to connect you to many future employers. My recommendation is if you have a job then keep it and do the LLM part-time. If you don’t have a job and can’t find one, then seriously consider getting your LLM (full-time or part-time) from the best school possible in that particular area of the law because in the future this may be a new unspoken requirement in many fields of law such as securities and banking law. Please do not forget some important facts: 1) the law and the legal profession are both becoming more specialized and more complex; and 2) most employers today would rather hire someone that already has a strong foundation in their chosen field than to have to pay for and take valuable time to train that lawyer. Also, the proliferation of LLM programs is changing the landscape of the legal profession and “upping the ante” as they say in poker.
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drums2345
Check out the Linked-in group for the Georgetown Securities & Financial Law Forum to get the inside scoop on this program.
http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=2871304&trk=anetsrch_name&goback=.gdr_1269748624303_1
Check out the Linked-in group for the Georgetown Securities & Financial Law Forum to get the inside scoop on this program.
http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=2871304&trk=anetsrch_name&goback=.gdr_1269748624303_1
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laxlaw
Drums2345:

Would you perhaps give us your honest assesment of how the LLMs (particularly full time) in the Gtown securities law program place in the dc legal scene.

For example:
Of the ~25 full time students:
x SEC
x CFTC
x Other gov't
x Big law
x medium law
x non-securities related
x UNEMPLOYED (caps because this is the big ? these days)

Feel free to categorize however you wish. Also, more explination as to how students reach these positions would also be helpful.

Thanks in advance!
Drums2345:

Would you perhaps give us your honest assesment of how the LLMs (particularly full time) in the Gtown securities law program place in the dc legal scene.

For example:
Of the ~25 full time students:
x SEC
x CFTC
x Other gov't
x Big law
x medium law
x non-securities related
x UNEMPLOYED (caps because this is the big ? these days)

Feel free to categorize however you wish. Also, more explination as to how students reach these positions would also be helpful.

Thanks in advance!
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laxlaw
Bump
Bump
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drums2345
I don't have access to the precise numbers. However, what I have seen is that getting a job is almost always based upon the relationships developed with those hiring or those whom know others that are hiring. These have been primarily fostered through interships, externships, relationships with professors, etc. Just being in and finishing the program, at the current time, by itself may not and probably willl not be enough to get someone a job.
I don't have access to the precise numbers. However, what I have seen is that getting a job is almost always based upon the relationships developed with those hiring or those whom know others that are hiring. These have been primarily fostered through interships, externships, relationships with professors, etc. Just being in and finishing the program, at the current time, by itself may not and probably willl not be enough to get someone a job.
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gordman
Seems like Georgetown has a really good reputation and the students like the programme so this is probably the best option for studying securities law in the US. A friend of mine is studying in Harvard, they're also famous for the law programme but I am sure everybody knows this. Now it seems liek the Harvard admission proccess - read more at http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/donnychia79/2010/06/wheelers-stint-affects-harvard-admissions-process/ - will be reformed. I am curious about the outcome of the Wheeler affair ...
Seems like Georgetown has a really good reputation and the students like the programme so this is probably the best option for studying securities law in the US. A friend of mine is studying in Harvard, they're also famous for the law programme but I am sure everybody knows this. Now it seems liek the Harvard admission proccess - read more at http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/donnychia79/2010/06/wheelers-stint-affects-harvard-admissions-process/ - will be reformed. I am curious about the outcome of the Wheeler affair ...
quote
dvermulm
I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.
I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.
quote
logflume
I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.


As a current student there, I don't think you would stand much to gain by getting an LLM at Cardozo if you are interested in securities law.
<blockquote>I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.
</blockquote>

As a current student there, I don't think you would stand much to gain by getting an LLM at Cardozo if you are interested in securities law.
quote
laxlaw
I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.


It's worth a shot, but I know people last admissions cycle that were T1 >40% with relevant experience that got dinged. The program is especially in demand due to the increased hiring at the SEC and CFTC as well as the economic downturn.
<blockquote>I'm interested in applying for the 2012 fall L.L.M. Securities program at Georgetown. The problem is my GPA is around 2.9 (though I have 2 semesters left to improve it) and my law school is ranked 70th in the U.S. Is it unrealistic for me apply with those grades and given my school's lack of prominence?

Also, would it be wise to do a self-directed L.L.M. in Sec Law at say a Fordham or Cardozo given those schools are located in the Securities Law Capital of the world (NYC)?

Any thoughts or comments will be appreciated.

Thanks.
</blockquote>

It's worth a shot, but I know people last admissions cycle that were T1 >40% with relevant experience that got dinged. The program is especially in demand due to the increased hiring at the SEC and CFTC as well as the economic downturn.
quote
I am debating the Georgetown Securities LL.M? My debate is whether the degree is economically worth it? Those of you who have done it... what was the placement like for those completing the Georgetown LL.M. in careers with Govt, law firms, unemployed, etc.

As background I worked in a Large Investment Bank in London for a year in the compliance department. I then came to law school at a Third Tier School (3.25 GPA, top 30% in class) and I have an internship with the Securities and Exchange Commission next semester.

I am hoping my SEC internship will lead to a job and I never have to decide to pursue the Securities LL.M. Downsides: taking on more debt and cutting off other areas of practice I have considered (mostly Real Estate). Upside: my top career goal is to work at the SEC or DOJ and I am hoping this could help with that and if I work at one of those programs my loans would be forgiven in 10 years anyway.

I am not considering any other LL.M. programs because I think by an large the "tax law from a top 3 school advice" is true. This is the Georgetown Securities LL.M. is the only exception to that rule I can think of.
I am debating the Georgetown Securities LL.M? My debate is whether the degree is economically worth it? Those of you who have done it... what was the placement like for those completing the Georgetown LL.M. in careers with Govt, law firms, unemployed, etc.

As background I worked in a Large Investment Bank in London for a year in the compliance department. I then came to law school at a Third Tier School (3.25 GPA, top 30% in class) and I have an internship with the Securities and Exchange Commission next semester.

I am hoping my SEC internship will lead to a job and I never have to decide to pursue the Securities LL.M. Downsides: taking on more debt and cutting off other areas of practice I have considered (mostly Real Estate). Upside: my top career goal is to work at the SEC or DOJ and I am hoping this could help with that and if I work at one of those programs my loans would be forgiven in 10 years anyway.

I am not considering any other LL.M. programs because I think by an large the "tax law from a top 3 school advice" is true. This is the Georgetown Securities LL.M. is the only exception to that rule I can think of.
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