LLM or JD for an American Citizen studying abroad?


Hello folks,

I am an American citizen studying my bachelors of law at India. I will be finishing my course this year. I had two very important questions:

1) Assuming the fact that i am an American citizen and intend to practice in the states, what would be more preferable- An LLM or a JD?

2) Could someone also point out the pro's and cons of each, keeping my situation in mind and also what we more important in getting a job at a law firm. (I am a talented law student with a natural flair for the law)
Hello folks,

I am an American citizen studying my bachelors of law at India. I will be finishing my course this year. I had two very important questions:

1) Assuming the fact that i am an American citizen and intend to practice in the states, what would be more preferable- An LLM or a JD?

2) Could someone also point out the pro's and cons of each, keeping my situation in mind and also what we more important in getting a job at a law firm. (I am a talented law student with a natural flair for the law)
quote
nafreeme
If money isn't an issue (don't know if it is - hope it isn't), I reckon the JD would be your best bet...
If money isn't an issue (don't know if it is - hope it isn't), I reckon the JD would be your best bet...
quote
If i wanted to practice in New York or California wouldn't an LLM be enough?

Thanks
If i wanted to practice in New York or California wouldn't an LLM be enough?

Thanks
quote
nafreeme
Yep... but one thing is being able to practice (i.e., sit and pass the bar exam); finding a job is a different ball game altogether. I've always heard that US law firms prefer JD graduates... don't know if that is true, but rumor has it it's much easier to get a job if you've got a JD. To be quite honest, I hope that's not true... I don't have the cash and time to invest in a JD, so I've also chosen the LLM shorter route to fulfill the bar requirements... Maybe, because you're a US citizen, things might be a bit different... but then again, you're still a foreign-trained lawyer...
Yep... but one thing is being able to practice (i.e., sit and pass the bar exam); finding a job is a different ball game altogether. I've always heard that US law firms prefer JD graduates... don't know if that is true, but rumor has it it's much easier to get a job if you've got a JD. To be quite honest, I hope that's not true... I don't have the cash and time to invest in a JD, so I've also chosen the LLM shorter route to fulfill the bar requirements... Maybe, because you're a US citizen, things might be a bit different... but then again, you're still a foreign-trained lawyer...
quote
KJP
If working in the US is the ultimate goal, I would think that JD is still the best bet. For purposes of being licensed to practice, an LLM will indeed suffice. Neither degree is an assurance of employment, however, given the current predicament of the legal profession in the US.
If working in the US is the ultimate goal, I would think that JD is still the best bet. For purposes of being licensed to practice, an LLM will indeed suffice. Neither degree is an assurance of employment, however, given the current predicament of the legal profession in the US.
quote
Thank you so much.

What are the specific advantages a JD has vis a vis an LLM. Is employment and the ability to practice all over the only criteria that differentiates the two?

I frankly cannot spend vast amounts of money and time and should make do with an LLM (A bachelor's in law in India is of a 5 year duration)

Are there open universities that enable one to pursue a JD simultaneously?
Thank you so much.

What are the specific advantages a JD has vis a vis an LLM. Is employment and the ability to practice all over the only criteria that differentiates the two?

I frankly cannot spend vast amounts of money and time and should make do with an LLM (A bachelor's in law in India is of a 5 year duration)

Are there open universities that enable one to pursue a JD simultaneously?
quote
nafreeme
There are some universities that allow you to transfer from the LLM to the JD. But, in most cases, you need an outstanding performance in our LLM to be allowed to transfer... and they usually have caps on the number of students who may do this. The good thing is that, most universities that allow you to transfer don't ask for a LSAT score...
There are some universities that allow you to transfer from the LLM to the JD. But, in most cases, you need an outstanding performance in our LLM to be allowed to transfer... and they usually have caps on the number of students who may do this. The good thing is that, most universities that allow you to transfer don't ask for a LSAT score...
quote
KJP
What are the specific advantages a JD has vis a vis an LLM. Is employment and the ability to practice all over the only criteria that differentiates the two?


In terms of employment, I understand that a JD is more attractive because of the greater length of time for study of US laws, as opposed to the limited length of time under an LLM program.

As to qualifications to practice, I understand that some jurisdictions/states require a JD to be eligible to practice. But then again, I am not familiar with the requirements for each jurisdiction/state.
<blockquote>What are the specific advantages a JD has vis a vis an LLM. Is employment and the ability to practice all over the only criteria that differentiates the two? </blockquote>

In terms of employment, I understand that a JD is more attractive because of the greater length of time for study of US laws, as opposed to the limited length of time under an LLM program.

As to qualifications to practice, I understand that some jurisdictions/states require a JD to be eligible to practice. But then again, I am not familiar with the requirements for each jurisdiction/state.
quote

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