LLM/JD straight after LLB


Hiya everyone,

I'm a law student at a British university currently in my second year and I'm interested in returning to the United States. I'm keen on practicing there, too, but I'm unsure on how to go about this.

Some say that I should graduate and qualify in England before going back, but I'm not too fond about this option (for personal reasons); I haven't totally ruled it out, though. Thus I've been looking at doing either an LLM or a JD. What do you guys think? - which would be a better option?

How do employers in CA/NY perceive an individual with an LLM from an ABA-approved school with no post-degree work?

I'm really confused about this...so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Hiya everyone,

I'm a law student at a British university currently in my second year and I'm interested in returning to the United States. I'm keen on practicing there, too, but I'm unsure on how to go about this.

Some say that I should graduate and qualify in England before going back, but I'm not too fond about this option (for personal reasons); I haven't totally ruled it out, though. Thus I've been looking at doing either an LLM or a JD. What do you guys think? - which would be a better option?

How do employers in CA/NY perceive an individual with an LLM from an ABA-approved school with no post-degree work?

I'm really confused about this...so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

quote
Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.
Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.
quote
Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.


Thanks for the reply. Well it's hard to tell what exactly is a top 10 UK university because the rankings are all over the place lol. But yes my university is up there - it's the best in its region.

I'm aware of the fact that my LLB does not suffice in its own right, that's why I'm looking towards doing either an LLM or a JD. How about CA and NY, though? I mean if it's faster and cheaper to do an LLM, is that not a better option for restricting myself to those two states? Then again I would prefer the flexibility of moving to other places in America, even to, say, Florida, where I was before moving back to the UK.

Perhaps I'm looking a little too much into this....
<blockquote>Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.</blockquote>

Thanks for the reply. Well it's hard to tell what exactly is a top 10 UK university because the rankings are all over the place lol. But yes my university is up there - it's the best in its region.

I'm aware of the fact that my LLB does not suffice in its own right, that's why I'm looking towards doing either an LLM or a JD. How about CA and NY, though? I mean if it's faster and cheaper to do an LLM, is that not a better option for restricting myself to those two states? Then again I would prefer the flexibility of moving to other places in America, even to, say, Florida, where I was before moving back to the UK.

Perhaps I'm looking a little too much into this....
quote
The ultimate fact, and I have learnt this from all of my friends also is why would an American Law Firm accept you with only your possible 1 year (LLM) education in US Law when they can have their pick of the bunch from top law schools in America who have their 3 year JD and a solid foundation in American Law.

Doing an LLM is a great idea but its employment prospects in comparison to a JD are sparse...

But its all swings and roundabouts because there are many people with jobs in the US with a foreign legal education and just an LLM...it's all about how good you make yourself stand out.

If you want to sit the CA Bar, you must be a qualified Lawyer from the UK, New York is the only bar exam you can sit coming straight out of LLB (like I did)...I think in order to sit the Florida Bar you should be eligible after completing an LLM at a Florida University (don't quote me on this...I'm not sure!)
The ultimate fact, and I have learnt this from all of my friends also is why would an American Law Firm accept you with only your possible 1 year (LLM) education in US Law when they can have their pick of the bunch from top law schools in America who have their 3 year JD and a solid foundation in American Law.

Doing an LLM is a great idea but its employment prospects in comparison to a JD are sparse...

But its all swings and roundabouts because there are many people with jobs in the US with a foreign legal education and just an LLM...it's all about how good you make yourself stand out.

If you want to sit the CA Bar, you must be a qualified Lawyer from the UK, New York is the only bar exam you can sit coming straight out of LLB (like I did)...I think in order to sit the Florida Bar you should be eligible after completing an LLM at a Florida University (don't quote me on this...I'm not sure!)
quote
The ultimate fact, and I have learnt this from all of my friends also is why would an American Law Firm accept you with only your possible 1 year (LLM) education in US Law when they can have their pick of the bunch from top law schools in America who have their 3 year JD and a solid foundation in American Law.

Doing an LLM is a great idea but its employment prospects in comparison to a JD are sparse...

But its all swings and roundabouts because there are many people with jobs in the US with a foreign legal education and just an LLM...it's all about how good you make yourself stand out.

If you want to sit the CA Bar, you must be a qualified Lawyer from the UK, New York is the only bar exam you can sit coming straight out of LLB (like I did)...I think in order to sit the Florida Bar you should be eligible after completing an LLM at a Florida University (don't quote me on this...I'm not sure!)


I checked and you can sit for the bar in CA taking that you have four years of legal education - 3 years of an LLB and the latter from an LLM (at an ABA-approved law school).

It's just that I've been told so many different views on this, and I'm not sure which is best. I don't necessarily want to stick to only NY or CA, but then again they're a better option than England, in my opinion.

I'm going to contact some actual universities in America and see what they tell me about job options following an LLM, or the possible funding for a JD/advanced standing for a JD.
<blockquote>The ultimate fact, and I have learnt this from all of my friends also is why would an American Law Firm accept you with only your possible 1 year (LLM) education in US Law when they can have their pick of the bunch from top law schools in America who have their 3 year JD and a solid foundation in American Law.

Doing an LLM is a great idea but its employment prospects in comparison to a JD are sparse...

But its all swings and roundabouts because there are many people with jobs in the US with a foreign legal education and just an LLM...it's all about how good you make yourself stand out.

If you want to sit the CA Bar, you must be a qualified Lawyer from the UK, New York is the only bar exam you can sit coming straight out of LLB (like I did)...I think in order to sit the Florida Bar you should be eligible after completing an LLM at a Florida University (don't quote me on this...I'm not sure!)</blockquote>

I checked and you can sit for the bar in CA taking that you have four years of legal education - 3 years of an LLB and the latter from an LLM (at an ABA-approved law school).

It's just that I've been told so many different views on this, and I'm not sure which is best. I don't necessarily want to stick to only NY or CA, but then again they're a better option than England, in my opinion.

I'm going to contact some actual universities in America and see what they tell me about job options following an LLM, or the possible funding for a JD/advanced standing for a JD.
quote
elg329
Here's my question: couldn't you just take the NY Bar and then once qualified to practice in a US jurisdiction (NY) take most any other state's Bar exam to be able to practice there? Would they still look to the fact that your legal education (minus perhaps a US LLM) was foreign? Or at that pt would the education not play such a critical role cause you'd already be a lawyer in the US???
Here's my question: couldn't you just take the NY Bar and then once qualified to practice in a US jurisdiction (NY) take most any other state's Bar exam to be able to practice there? Would they still look to the fact that your legal education (minus perhaps a US LLM) was foreign? Or at that pt would the education not play such a critical role cause you'd already be a lawyer in the US???
quote
Durham Red
Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.


Another Brit trying to flee Blighty here. I'm in the same boat but have opted to do an LLM. I'm hoping that a uni of the quality of UPenn will accept me and look good enough on my resume to improve my chances, or Fordham in NY because they have a good set up to help find work afterwards (though how good it actually is, is anyones guess).

What course are you using to get you upto speed with the NY Bar Exam? Would you recommend it?

Good luch with the exam next week.
<blockquote>Hi,

I'm pretty much in the same boat, I finished my LLB in the UK this year and I'm British, however, I too want to work in the US (New York).

I am sitting my New York Bar Exam next week and then intend to do an LLM later on this year to enhance my employment prospects. If you have the option of doing either a JD or LLM (keeping in mind the JD is 2 additional years in comparison to an LLM) then go for the JD because US Law Firms tend to view the JD more favourably.

You will have to sit the bar exam in your respective state and having an LLB is not a sufficient qualification for any state EXCEPT for New York.

If you want to get into a tier 1 law school to do an LLM, you must be at a pretty decent UK university (top 10) and have at least a 2.1 or be on course for that otherwise you are wasting your time.

Hope this helps.</blockquote>

Another Brit trying to flee Blighty here. I'm in the same boat but have opted to do an LLM. I'm hoping that a uni of the quality of UPenn will accept me and look good enough on my resume to improve my chances, or Fordham in NY because they have a good set up to help find work afterwards (though how good it actually is, is anyones guess).

What course are you using to get you upto speed with the NY Bar Exam? Would you recommend it?

Good luch with the exam next week.
quote
Here's my question: couldn't you just take the NY Bar and then once qualified to practice in a US jurisdiction (NY) take most any other state's Bar exam to be able to practice there? Would they still look to the fact that your legal education (minus perhaps a US LLM) was foreign? Or at that pt would the education not play such a critical role cause you'd already be a lawyer in the US???


I'm not sure because I do not know which states allow an individual to sit their bar based on the fact that they have passed NY's.
<blockquote>Here's my question: couldn't you just take the NY Bar and then once qualified to practice in a US jurisdiction (NY) take most any other state's Bar exam to be able to practice there? Would they still look to the fact that your legal education (minus perhaps a US LLM) was foreign? Or at that pt would the education not play such a critical role cause you'd already be a lawyer in the US???</blockquote>

I'm not sure because I do not know which states allow an individual to sit their bar based on the fact that they have passed NY's.
quote

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