LLM in Health Law Questions


Online One
Does U.S. News & World Report issue a unique ranking of only LLM programs that provide a health law designation?

Does anyone know of a website or book that lists all U.S. LLM programs that offer a degree designation in health law?
Does U.S. News & World Report issue a unique ranking of only LLM programs that provide a health law designation?

Does anyone know of a website or book that lists all U.S. LLM programs that offer a degree designation in health law?
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oma
Does U.S. News & World Report issue a unique ranking of only LLM programs that provide a health law designation?


Negative.

Does anyone know of a website or book that lists all U.S. LLM programs that offer a degree designation in health law?


Try this website: http://www.llm-guide.com/search
<blockquote>Does U.S. News & World Report issue a unique ranking of only LLM programs that provide a health law designation?</blockquote>

Negative.

<blockquote>Does anyone know of a website or book that lists all U.S. LLM programs that offer a degree designation in health law?</blockquote>

Try this website: http://www.llm-guide.com/search
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Online One
Thanks.
Thanks.
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pedrinus
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Online One
The University of Houston Law Center has one of the top two Health Law LLM's in the country!!!

check it out!!


I will, thanks. Who ranked it #2?
<blockquote>The University of Houston Law Center has one of the top two Health Law LLM's in the country!!!

check it out!!</blockquote>

I will, thanks. Who ranked it #2?
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pedrinus
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Online One
http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/health

US - Best graduate schools - check it out


Thank you very much.
<blockquote>http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/health

US - Best graduate schools - check it out</blockquote>

Thank you very much.
quote
Online One
http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/health

US - Best graduate schools - check it out


My next question would be, if St. Louis University offers the top ranked LLM program in health law, should a lawyer seeking to bolster his or her health law credentials obtain an LLM in health law from St. Louis University or obtain an LLM without a health law certificate from Harvard or Yale? How would the typical health care employer (i.e., law firm, government, etc.) view his credentials, in the view of readers out there?
<blockquote>http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/grad/law/health

US - Best graduate schools - check it out</blockquote>

My next question would be, if St. Louis University offers the top ranked LLM program in health law, should a lawyer seeking to bolster his or her health law credentials obtain an LLM in health law from St. Louis University or obtain an LLM without a health law certificate from Harvard or Yale? How would the typical health care employer (i.e., law firm, government, etc.) view his credentials, in the view of readers out there?
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pedrinus
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Online One
Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..



Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus?
<blockquote>Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..

</blockquote>

Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus?
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A prospective LLM student should apply for, and attend, a law school he or she will be happy (and comfortable) with. After all, it is an academic credential that will be with that person for life.
A prospective LLM student should apply for, and attend, a law school he or she will be happy (and comfortable) with. After all, it is an academic credential that will be with that person for life.
quote
QSWE
Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..



Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus?


Had it been so, those failing to make it into the top ranking institutions would have to cease their right to existence, because they have been certified as being irreparably "not smart".


At the end of the day, it is your whole set of credentials, your work-ex, the nature of the work you did, the kind of performance you put in at the law school. All these points matter and, it is the holistic picture that is to be taken into account and no one stands to lose their chance merely because they failed to attend a particulat institution.
<blockquote><blockquote>Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..

</blockquote>

Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus? </blockquote>

Had it been so, those failing to make it into the top ranking institutions would have to cease their right to existence, because they have been certified as being irreparably "not smart".


At the end of the day, it is your whole set of credentials, your work-ex, the nature of the work you did, the kind of performance you put in at the law school. All these points matter and, it is the holistic picture that is to be taken into account and no one stands to lose their chance merely because they failed to attend a particulat institution.
quote
Online One
Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..



Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus?


Had it been so, those failing to make it into the top ranking institutions would have to cease their right to existence, because they have been certified as being irreparably "not smart".


At the end of the day, it is your whole set of credentials, your work-ex, the nature of the work you did, the kind of performance you put in at the law school. All these points matter and, it is the holistic picture that is to be taken into account and no one stands to lose their chance merely because they failed to attend a particulat institution.


Certainly the whole picture of a lawyer's qualifications is important. And certainly personal satisfaction with the curriculum of studies is important. But putting aside these kinds of considerations and focusing solely upon whether one course of action or another better positions a lawyer to obtain a prestigious, well-paying position in a major market, would the lawyer be advised to attend St. Louis or Harvard if the goal is to do health law?
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Obviously some names count for everything!!!

People are very obsessed with names and this is the reality in our profession...

If you don't mind where you go as long as you have a good education, plus paying less...go to St Louis or Houston. But if you need the name...go to Harvard.

Everyone is going to tell you to go to a top school!!!

Just think what do you want to do!! It is better to study something you really want to do...and then if you like it do a general LLM say in the UK or even in the US if you can afford it... or just go straight to the Top school one..

</blockquote>

Right, thanks. So it would seem that the ranking of special programs is irrelevant from an employer standpoint. If two candidates have the exact same qualifications and are seeking a health law position, and one has an LLM from Harvard and one has an LLM in Health Law from St. Louis, the Harvard guy or gal wins out, even though he or she knows less about health law because the presumption is he or she is a smarter candidate and will perform better. Is that the consensus? </blockquote>

Had it been so, those failing to make it into the top ranking institutions would have to cease their right to existence, because they have been certified as being irreparably "not smart".


At the end of the day, it is your whole set of credentials, your work-ex, the nature of the work you did, the kind of performance you put in at the law school. All these points matter and, it is the holistic picture that is to be taken into account and no one stands to lose their chance merely because they failed to attend a particulat institution.</blockquote>

Certainly the whole picture of a lawyer's qualifications is important. And certainly personal satisfaction with the curriculum of studies is important. But putting aside these kinds of considerations and focusing solely upon whether one course of action or another better positions a lawyer to obtain a prestigious, well-paying position in a major market, would the lawyer be advised to attend St. Louis or Harvard if the goal is to do health law?
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Nail
Online one, I think this is a crucial question and I have raised the same issue in "is Harvard LLM worth it". Hopefully someone will reply, at some point!
Cheers,
Nail
Online one, I think this is a crucial question and I have raised the same issue in "is Harvard LLM worth it". Hopefully someone will reply, at some point!
Cheers,
Nail
quote
Online one, I think this is a crucial question and I have raised the same issue in "is Harvard LLM worth it". Hopefully someone will reply, at some point!
Cheers,
Nail


Why do you want a Harvard LLM? Where did you get your undergraduate degree? I am looking into a health law LLM, but don't know what Harvard would do for me. Then again, I graduated with honors from Michigan. As far as I am concerned, Harvard is worthless for an LLM.

Yale law is the best LLM for future professors. Otherwise, I am not certain a "prestigious" LLM has the cache you think it does. A Harvard LLM won't make up for poor grades and/or a 2nd tier or below JD. I think you should have a good reason for getting an LLM, and if you do and the school is noted for that area, then the degree is worthwhile.

I think Houston has the best LLM program in health law. Why? Because the school has a strong health law policy institute, has a respected law school, and is located near the largest medical center in the world - the Houston Medical Center. Saint Louis is ranked as the best health law LLM, but I wouldn't go there. The University of Houston is a much better law school. Of course, there are many other factors to consider like geography. If you want to spend your career in Saint Louis, then I wouldn't hesitate to go there for the LLM.

In short, any top 5 health law LLM will be fine as long as you do well. Be forewarned, however, the LLM is not an instant job ticket, so you better be very confident about why you want the degree and what you hope to get out of it before getting involved in any LLM program. Good luck in whatever you decide.
<blockquote>Online one, I think this is a crucial question and I have raised the same issue in "is Harvard LLM worth it". Hopefully someone will reply, at some point!
Cheers,
Nail</blockquote>

Why do you want a Harvard LLM? Where did you get your undergraduate degree? I am looking into a health law LLM, but don't know what Harvard would do for me. Then again, I graduated with honors from Michigan. As far as I am concerned, Harvard is worthless for an LLM.

Yale law is the best LLM for future professors. Otherwise, I am not certain a "prestigious" LLM has the cache you think it does. A Harvard LLM won't make up for poor grades and/or a 2nd tier or below JD. I think you should have a good reason for getting an LLM, and if you do and the school is noted for that area, then the degree is worthwhile.

I think Houston has the best LLM program in health law. Why? Because the school has a strong health law policy institute, has a respected law school, and is located near the largest medical center in the world - the Houston Medical Center. Saint Louis is ranked as the best health law LLM, but I wouldn't go there. The University of Houston is a much better law school. Of course, there are many other factors to consider like geography. If you want to spend your career in Saint Louis, then I wouldn't hesitate to go there for the LLM.

In short, any top 5 health law LLM will be fine as long as you do well. Be forewarned, however, the LLM is not an instant job ticket, so you better be very confident about why you want the degree and what you hope to get out of it before getting involved in any LLM program. Good luck in whatever you decide.
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