Foreign lawyer in the US? You don't need LLM.


aalba

I am an american citizen, but I studied in Dominican Republic (civil system). I want to know if the fact of being american improves my possibilities of being hired by a good firm after doing an LLM in the US.

I am an american citizen, but I studied in Dominican Republic (civil system). I want to know if the fact of being american improves my possibilities of being hired by a good firm after doing an LLM in the US.
quote
richardvf

All things being equal, being a US citizen will definitely help you get an attorney job. However, you will be competing against US citizen applicants with American J.D. degrees. You will need to attend the best LL.M program you can get into and excel.

All things being equal, being a US citizen will definitely help you get an attorney job. However, you will be competing against US citizen applicants with American J.D. degrees. You will need to attend the best LL.M program you can get into and excel.
quote
aalba

Now I have a new concern. Imagine this situation, I am an american citizen but I studied my Law Carrer in Dominican Republic (four years at university) and I am Lawyer under this system (Civil Law). If I decide to make a JD program in USA, that would be just three more years of studies, or I would have to make precollege studies before I enter to Law School?

Now I have a new concern. Imagine this situation, I am an american citizen but I studied my Law Carrer in Dominican Republic (four years at university) and I am Lawyer under this system (Civil Law). If I decide to make a JD program in USA, that would be just three more years of studies, or I would have to make precollege studies before I enter to Law School?
quote
hannenyh

Nope. You can enter into the JD program based on your foreign education. You might even be able to finish your JD in two years if you do well on the LSAT and etc. This is due to the fact that several American schools let you "waive" one year for your foreign law degree. Good luck.

There are several useful posts in the JD category. They will direct you in the right direction.

Nope. You can enter into the JD program based on your foreign education. You might even be able to finish your JD in two years if you do well on the LSAT and etc. This is due to the fact that several American schools let you "waive" one year for your foreign law degree. Good luck.

There are several useful posts in the JD category. They will direct you in the right direction.
quote
aalba

Where is the JD category? What is an LSAT?

Where is the JD category? What is an LSAT?
quote
Russ

Where is the JD category?

http://www.llm-guide.com/board/jd

What is an LSAT?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test

<blockquote>Where is the JD category?</blockquote>
http://www.llm-guide.com/board/jd

<blockquote>What is an LSAT?</blockquote>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test
quote
sdess

Thank you to mauricel and richrddvf for the insightfull answers. now I have 2 questions, I'm sure that have been asked before:1) which are the most sought after LLM for the employers? 2)And of course which universities are they more likely to recruit you from?
Thanks!!!

Thank you to mauricel and richrddvf for the insightfull answers. now I have 2 questions, I'm sure that have been asked before:1) which are the most sought after LLM for the employers? 2)And of course which universities are they more likely to recruit you from?
Thanks!!!
quote
ginni

hi smartguy ,
i haV a query... i hav done my LLB degree from india...
cn i practice in states? do i need 2 do LLM or is there any other exam for that?
do advice me

hi smartguy ,
i haV a query... i hav done my LLB degree from india...
cn i practice in states? do i need 2 do LLM or is there any other exam for that?
do advice me
quote
mauricel

Thank you to mauricel and richrddvf for the insightfull answers. now I have 2 questions, I'm sure that have been asked before:1) which are the most sought after LLM for the employers? 2)And of course which universities are they more likely to recruit you from?
Thanks!!!


I'm afraid your questions are too broad to be answered. Which state/s do you want to go? and what kind of employers are you talking about? private firms? gov't?or?

Be precise please.

maurice

<blockquote>Thank you to mauricel and richrddvf for the insightfull answers. now I have 2 questions, I'm sure that have been asked before:1) which are the most sought after LLM for the employers? 2)And of course which universities are they more likely to recruit you from?
Thanks!!!</blockquote>

I'm afraid your questions are too broad to be answered. Which state/s do you want to go? and what kind of employers are you talking about? private firms? gov't?or?

Be precise please.

maurice
quote
sdess

I hold a LLB from a European civil law country and am mostly looking into International Business Transactions and Trade law (trade regulations, not only antitrust, we can expand that to import/export regulations) in the US, I plan to stay on the East coast, and am looking into law firms, but not exclusively, there are other options such as government jobs and consultancy agencies. I am a US citizen, even though it's known that fact boost employability, I definitely want to make the right choice on the university who has the right LLM giving me not only a solid program but also good work prospects. I know that law firms are not crazy about LLMs, the schools that I am mostly looking into are: Georgetown, American University /WCL, Fordham, and NYU. I also had a pick on Arizona ( James E Rogers) since they have a pretty good program.
Thanks Maurice
SD

I hold a LLB from a European civil law country and am mostly looking into International Business Transactions and Trade law (trade regulations, not only antitrust, we can expand that to import/export regulations) in the US, I plan to stay on the East coast, and am looking into law firms, but not exclusively, there are other options such as government jobs and consultancy agencies. I am a US citizen, even though it's known that fact boost employability, I definitely want to make the right choice on the university who has the right LLM giving me not only a solid program but also good work prospects. I know that law firms are not crazy about LLMs, the schools that I am mostly looking into are: Georgetown, American University /WCL, Fordham, and NYU. I also had a pick on Arizona ( James E Rogers) since they have a pretty good program.
Thanks Maurice
SD
quote
mauricel

We love specifics here, but sorry i'm not that familiar with the east coast.

Anybody?

regard
maurice

We love specifics here, but sorry i'm not that familiar with the east coast.

Anybody?

regard
maurice
quote
nanie8328

Hi, I'm a foreign lawyer but NOT ATTORNEY, I didn't pass the bar in France nor Spain even though I studied 4 years in a French law school and 1 year in Spain. (I'm French and Spanish)
Since December 07, I'm working as legal assistant/trainee with Visa J1 in the US (ohio and louisiana) and I don't want to do a LLM (too expensive :) ). I called the Cal Bar admission and they want me to register as law student and start paying just to advise me if I'm eligible to sit the bar.
So I was wondering without LLM or license to practice but with 9 months or legal experience in the US and some courses in France in commoin law done by americans and british teachers, do you think I could be eligible to sit for the bar exam in California now or would it be better to wait, pass the bar in France or Spain and come back with my license ?
Thanks

Hi, I'm a foreign lawyer but NOT ATTORNEY, I didn't pass the bar in France nor Spain even though I studied 4 years in a French law school and 1 year in Spain. (I'm French and Spanish)
Since December 07, I'm working as legal assistant/trainee with Visa J1 in the US (ohio and louisiana) and I don't want to do a LLM (too expensive :) ). I called the Cal Bar admission and they want me to register as law student and start paying just to advise me if I'm eligible to sit the bar.
So I was wondering without LLM or license to practice but with 9 months or legal experience in the US and some courses in France in commoin law done by americans and british teachers, do you think I could be eligible to sit for the bar exam in California now or would it be better to wait, pass the bar in France or Spain and come back with my license ?
Thanks
quote
richardvf

California recently changed its requirements regarding non-attorney foreign applicants who wish to take the bar examination.

http://calbar.ca.gov/calbar/pdfs/admissions/Outside-Ed-Qualif.pdf

It appears that California now requires an LL.M if your foreign law degree is considered an equivalent of a J.D. degree. Basically, it is much easier to meet the requirements for admission to the California bar if you are licensed as an attorney in your home country. I am surprised that with 5 years of university legal education you never received a license. Good luck.

California recently changed its requirements regarding non-attorney foreign applicants who wish to take the bar examination.

http://calbar.ca.gov/calbar/pdfs/admissions/Outside-Ed-Qualif.pdf

It appears that California now requires an LL.M if your foreign law degree is considered an equivalent of a J.D. degree. Basically, it is much easier to meet the requirements for admission to the California bar if you are licensed as an attorney in your home country. I am surprised that with 5 years of university legal education you never received a license. Good luck.
quote
nanie8328

Thanks Richard !
Actually in France, after 4 years of law, you've got to review all the law during one year at the IEJ (institut d'études judiciaires) then, pass the exam to enter at the CRFPA (school for attorneys)
Then, you've got to learn how to become a French attorney at the CRFPA during 18 months and then, after others exams you can say you've got your license to practice :)
Thanks again

Thanks Richard !
Actually in France, after 4 years of law, you've got to review all the law during one year at the IEJ (institut d'études judiciaires) then, pass the exam to enter at the CRFPA (school for attorneys)
Then, you've got to learn how to become a French attorney at the CRFPA during 18 months and then, after others exams you can say you've got your license to practice :)
Thanks again
quote
SilviaLLM

To all foreign lawyers in the US (including myself): I hope we all agree on one thing that LLM will never replace JD degree.
If you intend to practice law in the US with LLM you have to understand that you are "handicapped" (class B if it sounds better) from educational point of view.
If all you want from LLM is to be able to sit for NY bar exam, i think i have good news how to save admission headaches and $25,000 tuition + another $10,000 for living expenses.
Here is what you can do:
Stage One: Get admitted to your home Bar.
Stage Two: Take and pass California bax exam as attorney admitted in foreign jurisdiction.
Stage Three: no no no, just two.
Congratulations. You saved $35,000, one year of your life, admission headaches AND you can call your self US attorney now.
Questions?
Hi smartguy.
Could you please, let me know about California Bar.
I am an attorney from Brazil, with Bar in Brazil. Our system is not common law. California Bar should accept that???
Thanks for your information
Silvia

To all foreign lawyers in the US (including myself): I hope we all agree on one thing that LLM will never replace JD degree.
If you intend to practice law in the US with LLM you have to understand that you are "handicapped" (class B if it sounds better) from educational point of view.
If all you want from LLM is to be able to sit for NY bar exam, i think i have good news how to save admission headaches and $25,000 tuition + another $10,000 for living expenses.
Here is what you can do:
Stage One: Get admitted to your home Bar.
Stage Two: Take and pass California bax exam as attorney admitted in foreign jurisdiction.
Stage Three: no no no, just two.
Congratulations. You saved $35,000, one year of your life, admission headaches AND you can call your self US attorney now.
Questions?
Hi smartguy.
Could you please, let me know about California Bar.
I am an attorney from Brazil, with Bar in Brazil. Our system is not common law. California Bar should accept that???
Thanks for your information
Silvia
quote
richardvf

Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.

Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.
quote
c.urresti

Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.


Same case here... How about NY? Is it possible to sit for the NY bar after finishing a US LLM program? or do they just reject all Civil Law LLB degrees?

<blockquote>Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.</blockquote>

Same case here... How about NY? Is it possible to sit for the NY bar after finishing a US LLM program? or do they just reject all Civil Law LLB degrees?
quote

Hi smartguy,

You seem to know a lot. Can you please advice me as to the following questions:
--What are the job oppurtunities for a foreign lawyer in the US(with or without LLM)?
--What sort of salaries can they expect after clearing the Bar?
--How easy it is to get a job? Can you rate it on a scale of 10?
--Are there any particular practice areas in which foreign lawyers have a better chance of getting a job? Conversely, are there any areas which are a strict no-no for foreign lawyers?
--Can foreign lawyers expect to make it big in the field of litigation?
--Is there any sort of bias against foreign lawyers especially against asians?

Your advice is highly appreciated. Thanks. Cheers!



Intuition whispers to my ear you have never been to the us before. am i right?
let's start with simple facts. once you get admitted you're not foreign attorney anymore.
if you are looking for self employed carrering i doubt your client will ever inquire which school have you graduated from.
if you're looking for employment in top notch law firms... well you have to be damn good... at least better than your other American candidates.
as for money i think with no substantial experience you can start with $2,500-3,000/month.
Litigation is not the field where you can make big money, i would say Intellectual Property is the most money attractive field now.
Believe me you will not be able to handle 8 hours deposition in English. You don't have to. Think about your strong side. English is obviously not the one. No offense, Neither it is mine. I think if you can pass US bar exam and find great job in your home country you can make much more than here. Don't get me wrong, it's not about competition. There 300,000 members in California Bar. If you're able to find your niche here i welcome you to do so. If you think your strong side in your home law - pass the Bar here and go for it.


hi, am bharath, law graduate from india. am trying to practice law in usa. until reading this blogs i am under an impression that foreign lawyers must study law in usa and then only he can practice. thanks for the information. and if u guys know please let me know how will be the bar examinatons ther and its difficulty.and what are the troubles for a foreign lawyer in practicing law in usa with out studying there. could u please let me know, and also the how is the pay scale for foreign lawyers there.

regards
bharath

<blockquote><blockquote>Hi smartguy,

You seem to know a lot. Can you please advice me as to the following questions:
--What are the job oppurtunities for a foreign lawyer in the US(with or without LLM)?
--What sort of salaries can they expect after clearing the Bar?
--How easy it is to get a job? Can you rate it on a scale of 10?
--Are there any particular practice areas in which foreign lawyers have a better chance of getting a job? Conversely, are there any areas which are a strict no-no for foreign lawyers?
--Can foreign lawyers expect to make it big in the field of litigation?
--Is there any sort of bias against foreign lawyers especially against asians?

Your advice is highly appreciated. Thanks. Cheers!

</blockquote>

Intuition whispers to my ear you have never been to the us before. am i right?
let's start with simple facts. once you get admitted you're not foreign attorney anymore.
if you are looking for self employed carrering i doubt your client will ever inquire which school have you graduated from.
if you're looking for employment in top notch law firms... well you have to be damn good... at least better than your other American candidates.
as for money i think with no substantial experience you can start with $2,500-3,000/month.
Litigation is not the field where you can make big money, i would say Intellectual Property is the most money attractive field now.
Believe me you will not be able to handle 8 hours deposition in English. You don't have to. Think about your strong side. English is obviously not the one. No offense, Neither it is mine. I think if you can pass US bar exam and find great job in your home country you can make much more than here. Don't get me wrong, it's not about competition. There 300,000 members in California Bar. If you're able to find your niche here i welcome you to do so. If you think your strong side in your home law - pass the Bar here and go for it.</blockquote>

hi, am bharath, law graduate from india. am trying to practice law in usa. until reading this blogs i am under an impression that foreign lawyers must study law in usa and then only he can practice. thanks for the information. and if u guys know please let me know how will be the bar examinatons ther and its difficulty.and what are the troubles for a foreign lawyer in practicing law in usa with out studying there. could u please let me know, and also the how is the pay scale for foreign lawyers there.

regards
bharath
quote
shog

Hello,

First off, thank you smartguy for creating such an informative post. It is very helpful!
I am a bit confused about qualifying for the bar in CA. I'm a US citizen, have my BA degree from the States, but am working on my law degree in The Netherlands. Eventually I will go back to sit for the CA bar but am confused as to the qualification process. How will my foreign degree be evaluated? And, do i take just one or two years of additional legal studies in a US institution, in order to be qualified for the Cal bar? Any help would be appreciated from anyone.

Thanks!

Hello,

First off, thank you smartguy for creating such an informative post. It is very helpful!
I am a bit confused about qualifying for the bar in CA. I'm a US citizen, have my BA degree from the States, but am working on my law degree in The Netherlands. Eventually I will go back to sit for the CA bar but am confused as to the qualification process. How will my foreign degree be evaluated? And, do i take just one or two years of additional legal studies in a US institution, in order to be qualified for the Cal bar? Any help would be appreciated from anyone.

Thanks!
quote

Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.


hi am an indian lawyer just completed my law course. can i practice law in us with out any experience. and how is the bar exam conducted. do we need to write the exam in only or can write in online in india.
please let me know this informationa and i also want to know that how much i can earn ther in the starting

<blockquote>Yes. California will accept it. It doesn't matter if you come from a civil background so long as you are a licensed attorney in your home country.</blockquote>

hi am an indian lawyer just completed my law course. can i practice law in us with out any experience. and how is the bar exam conducted. do we need to write the exam in only or can write in online in india.
please let me know this informationa and i also want to know that how much i can earn ther in the starting
quote

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