Alternative Dispute Resolution


I m thinking of applying LL.M programs in the USA. I plan to specialize in ADR. Could you tell me which schools are the best place to get specialized on ADR.
Thanks in advance for your comments

I m thinking of applying LL.M programs in the USA. I plan to specialize in ADR. Could you tell me which schools are the best place to get specialized on ADR.
Thanks in advance for your comments
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advo2000
HLS is quite strong in ADR and offers quite a few courses in mediation, negotiation and dispute resolution (and a great negotiation workshop). Just have a look at their course catalogue.

And have a look to the PON website: http://www.pon.harvard.edu/about.php
"The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School (PON) is a world-renowned interdisciplinary center on negotiation and conflict resolution. Drawing from numerous fields of study, including law, business, government, psychology, economics, anthropology, and education, PON works to connect rigorous research and scholarship with a deep understanding of practice. PON presents lectures, discussions, classes, and conferences in addition to producing publications and teaching materials. Founded and based at Harvard Law School, PON is a consortium of faculty, students, and staff at Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tufts University, and other Boston-area schools."

So HLS is the place to go :-)
HLS is quite strong in ADR and offers quite a few courses in mediation, negotiation and dispute resolution (and a great negotiation workshop). Just have a look at their course catalogue.

And have a look to the PON website: http://www.pon.harvard.edu/about.php
"The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School (PON) is a world-renowned interdisciplinary center on negotiation and conflict resolution. Drawing from numerous fields of study, including law, business, government, psychology, economics, anthropology, and education, PON works to connect rigorous research and scholarship with a deep understanding of practice. PON presents lectures, discussions, classes, and conferences in addition to producing publications and teaching materials. Founded and based at Harvard Law School, PON is a consortium of faculty, students, and staff at Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tufts University, and other Boston-area schools."

So HLS is the place to go :-)
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lousalome
I agree that HLS is very strong in the field.. but, since not everybody is able to get into it, you should also think in other choices... Pepperdine has a specific program in ADR.. and Columbia, NYU and Georgetown also offer quite a lot of courses and have a strong reputation in the area...
Good Luck!
I agree that HLS is very strong in the field.. but, since not everybody is able to get into it, you should also think in other choices... Pepperdine has a specific program in ADR.. and Columbia, NYU and Georgetown also offer quite a lot of courses and have a strong reputation in the area...
Good Luck!
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advo2000
lousalome, I absolutely agree. With regard to ADR, the Straus Institute at Pepperdine might offer even more courses than HLS and certainly is easier to get into. What do you think of the University of Missouri-Columbia program?
lousalome, I absolutely agree. With regard to ADR, the Straus Institute at Pepperdine might offer even more courses than HLS and certainly is easier to get into. What do you think of the University of Missouri-Columbia program?
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lousalome
Well... That's the other specific program, isn't it?, I just got a look at it and seemed interesting... I did not apply to it, though.
What I found most difficutl when applying was the choice between a specific program in a "not so good ranked" law school (i.e. Pepperdine and Missouri) and a less specific course in a top-tier law school (like HLS, Columbia, NYU...). Firstly because, although you are quite sure about studying ADRs, being a foreign-trained lawyer, it may be a good idea to take some general courses on American Law (so, the existence of so many specific courses is not so important...). Secondly, because I guess that having a LLM from a "top" school is always more helpful that having an specific LLM... But, you know, I am foreign and still haven't done my LLM... I don't feel I have enough knoweledge about the job market and so, to give advice about it...
Do you know how are Pepperdine and Missouri LLMs regarded in order to get an employment in the area afterwards?
Well... That's the other specific program, isn't it?, I just got a look at it and seemed interesting... I did not apply to it, though.
What I found most difficutl when applying was the choice between a specific program in a "not so good ranked" law school (i.e. Pepperdine and Missouri) and a less specific course in a top-tier law school (like HLS, Columbia, NYU...). Firstly because, although you are quite sure about studying ADRs, being a foreign-trained lawyer, it may be a good idea to take some general courses on American Law (so, the existence of so many specific courses is not so important...). Secondly, because I guess that having a LLM from a "top" school is always more helpful that having an specific LLM... But, you know, I am foreign and still haven't done my LLM... I don't feel I have enough knoweledge about the job market and so, to give advice about it...
Do you know how are Pepperdine and Missouri LLMs regarded in order to get an employment in the area afterwards?
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asdi
I know the program at Missouri. It is a LLM degree (actually the only one offered by the law school) highly recognized within the ADR field; for many years it was ranked No. 1 by US News, I dont know its current position. The faculty is also nationally recognized, so they can help you to make some connections, mostly at other schools, programs and non profit organizations. I don't think you will be able to find a job at a top U.S. law firm after finishing the LLM in Dispute Resolution. For me it was an outstanding experience; actually it helped me a lot to get admitted into a top law school for another advanced degree program, not only due to the programs recognition, but also for the recommendation letters that I got from some of its faculty. If you are interested in ADR I strongly recommend Missouri.
I know the program at Missouri. It is a LLM degree (actually the only one offered by the law school) highly recognized within the ADR field; for many years it was ranked No. 1 by US News, I don’t know its current position. The faculty is also nationally recognized, so they can help you to make some connections, mostly at other schools, programs and non profit organizations. I don't think you will be able to find a job at a top U.S. law firm after finishing the LLM in Dispute Resolution. For me it was an outstanding experience; actually it helped me a lot to get admitted into a top law school for another advanced degree program, not only due to the program’s recognition, but also for the recommendation letters that I got from some of its faculty. If you are interested in ADR I strongly recommend Missouri.
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advo2000
Well, I am in the same position as you, lousalome, and haven't done yet my LL.M. neither. Even though not being a ranking-junky myself, I considered the aspects you mentioned, too. Therefore, I applied to both, specialized and medium ranked law schools as well as to top tier law schools. This way, some decision finding-difficulties might evaporate due to rejections... :) If not, well, then it comes down to the old question of how important name, ranking and reputation of your law school are to you. I discussed this question with many partners and associates, and the simple answer is: it's up to you. For those working in ADR and knowing the US LL.M. market, an LL.M. from Pepperdine or Missouri shows your specialization and might be a plus when applying to an ADR-department. However, for all others, the usual suspects (HLS, NYU and so forth) have a larger impact due to their general reputation. And this, certainly, is the case for all non-ADR areas. In the end, I decided against a specialized program as I do think that an LL.M. year should cover more than just one area of specialization. But again, this is personal and up to each of us when deciding... :)
Well, I am in the same position as you, lousalome, and haven't done yet my LL.M. neither. Even though not being a ranking-junky myself, I considered the aspects you mentioned, too. Therefore, I applied to both, specialized and medium ranked law schools as well as to top tier law schools. This way, some decision finding-difficulties might evaporate due to rejections... :) If not, well, then it comes down to the old question of how important name, ranking and reputation of your law school are to you. I discussed this question with many partners and associates, and the simple answer is: it's up to you. For those working in ADR and knowing the US LL.M. market, an LL.M. from Pepperdine or Missouri shows your specialization and might be a plus when applying to an ADR-department. However, for all others, the usual suspects (HLS, NYU and so forth) have a larger impact due to their general reputation. And this, certainly, is the case for all non-ADR areas. In the end, I decided against a specialized program as I do think that an LL.M. year should cover more than just one area of specialization. But again, this is personal and up to each of us when deciding... :)
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What do you think about to find a available position in USA after completing the study on Alternative Dispute Resolution? For me It seems a little bit diffucult to get a position in United States when you compare to other areas of law.

What do you think about to find a available position in USA after completing the study on Alternative Dispute Resolution? For me It seems a little bit diffucult to get a position in United States when you compare to other areas of law.
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jhn107
How difficult is it to get into a program like Missouri's? Any idea what the admission's statistics look like?
How difficult is it to get into a program like Missouri's? Any idea what the admission's statistics look like?
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josepidal
Honestly, I don't think many foriegn lawyers would have a shot at a big U.S. law firm until they pass the bar regardless of their school.

But LLMs apply to (and receive) jobs well before graduation, same as 3Ls.

And New York is not the only jurisdiction that allows LLMs to take the Bar.
<blockquote>Honestly, I don't think many foriegn lawyers would have a shot at a big U.S. law firm until they pass the bar regardless of their school. </blockquote>
But LLMs apply to (and receive) jobs well before graduation, same as 3Ls.

And New York is not the only jurisdiction that allows LLMs to take the Bar.
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You know for a very long time ppl said the world is flat - it was the accepted truth - no getting away from it - not until much later was it accepted to be round...

Now its becoming flat again. Not all foreign LLM applicants come to the US for getting a US job - but for those who do - they are told the JD is a superior degree - the accepted truth - but tell you what times are changing - with increasing integration of the world economy LLMs do get jobs (as corporate associates mainly in NY firms) - for reasons of commerce the change may well be conditioned by which country u hail from, the condition of the domestic economy of yr home state, the state of the US economy - but it is a reality... In fact from the jurisdiction from which I hail (one of the BRIC economies) - I know of 10 LLM graduates who did the baccalaureate from the law school I atteneded and went on to do the LLM Program at HLS/CLS/NYU after 2 years of work ex at home, ended up receiving associate positions at Skadden/Linklaters/W&C in the last two years. From what I have heard the firms pay for yr bar exam expenditure

So my 2 cents on the issue: Its all well to say LLM grads need to consider a transfer to the JD - but really think abt the opportunity cost of doing so... If u are looking for an associate position in a corp law firm in NY - job prospects for LLM applicants would largely depend on where you come from - I think most LLM applicants are smart enough to figure that out when they apply for the program in the first place...
You know for a very long time ppl said the world is flat - it was the accepted truth - no getting away from it - not until much later was it accepted to be round...

Now its becoming flat again. Not all foreign LLM applicants come to the US for getting a US job - but for those who do - they are told the JD is a superior degree - the accepted truth - but tell you what times are changing - with increasing integration of the world economy LLMs do get jobs (as corporate associates mainly in NY firms) - for reasons of commerce the change may well be conditioned by which country u hail from, the condition of the domestic economy of yr home state, the state of the US economy - but it is a reality... In fact from the jurisdiction from which I hail (one of the BRIC economies) - I know of 10 LLM graduates who did the baccalaureate from the law school I atteneded and went on to do the LLM Program at HLS/CLS/NYU after 2 years of work ex at home, ended up receiving associate positions at Skadden/Linklaters/W&C in the last two years. From what I have heard the firms pay for yr bar exam expenditure

So my 2 cents on the issue: Its all well to say LLM grads need to consider a transfer to the JD - but really think abt the opportunity cost of doing so... If u are looking for an associate position in a corp law firm in NY - job prospects for LLM applicants would largely depend on where you come from - I think most LLM applicants are smart enough to figure that out when they apply for the program in the first place...
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You guys really just need to start law school and see for yourself. I think once you are over here and in the classroom you'll have a considerably better grasp of the situation.
You guys really just need to start law school and see for yourself. I think once you are over here and in the classroom you'll have a considerably better grasp of the situation.
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I am coming. I have paid the deposit to Columbia for 2007-08. Josepidal, the other poster is currently enrolled at the LLM Program of HLS and there are many others like him active on this forum. I have bookmarked this pg on my browser - a year down the line in 2008 (after the LLM) - I will put up a post here abt how it turned out. I may not get a job for all u know; but I will be frank.

I do understand that you are only trying to help. But this speculation abt LLMs not getting jobs at NY law firms can only be settled statistically. Unfortunately I dont know of any organization which maintains such statistics. But if ppl who hv done the LLM degree (or are currently persuing it) and are active on forums such as this one are frank abt their own experience with the jobhunt - it will help a lot (I am sure ppl will not consider u pompous if u do so). It will also establish clearly a trend in terms of the regions of the world favoured for job selection. I know ppl and I am in touch with 10 of them (I got comments on my SOP from them) - most senior to me by a year or two from the law school I attended in my own country, who currently work in NY law firms or in the NY office of a UK law firm.

Tk care
I am coming. I have paid the deposit to Columbia for 2007-08. Josepidal, the other poster is currently enrolled at the LLM Program of HLS and there are many others like him active on this forum. I have bookmarked this pg on my browser - a year down the line in 2008 (after the LLM) - I will put up a post here abt how it turned out. I may not get a job for all u know; but I will be frank.

I do understand that you are only trying to help. But this speculation abt LLMs not getting jobs at NY law firms can only be settled statistically. Unfortunately I dont know of any organization which maintains such statistics. But if ppl who hv done the LLM degree (or are currently persuing it) and are active on forums such as this one are frank abt their own experience with the jobhunt - it will help a lot (I am sure ppl will not consider u pompous if u do so). It will also establish clearly a trend in terms of the regions of the world favoured for job selection. I know ppl and I am in touch with 10 of them (I got comments on my SOP from them) - most senior to me by a year or two from the law school I attended in my own country, who currently work in NY law firms or in the NY office of a UK law firm.

Tk care
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josepidal
it is kinda bizarre reading forums with foreigners who have co-opted many of the big law ideals and rankings-obsessions that I thought I only inhabited places like autoadmit.com.

You're right there, though we all have some equivalent to biglaw in our various home countries.
<blockquote>it is kinda bizarre reading forums with foreigners who have co-opted many of the big law ideals and rankings-obsessions that I thought I only inhabited places like autoadmit.com.</blockquote>
You're right there, though we all have some equivalent to biglaw in our various home countries.
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Well, law schools, for that matter all universities, law firms - are rated and ranked in my country too by a magazine. In todays world, you are never too far from a 'US News' - no matter where you are.
Well, law schools, for that matter all universities, law firms - are rated and ranked in my country too by a magazine. In todays world, you are never too far from a 'US News' - no matter where you are.
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I said I would be back and report. Well, I finished the LLM at Columbia and do have a job with a V-5 NY law firm.

To all those going for an LLM to the U.S. I can say this much: it is possible to get a job with good grades. Good luck!
I said I would be back and report. Well, I finished the LLM at Columbia and do have a job with a V-5 NY law firm.

To all those going for an LLM to the U.S. I can say this much: it is possible to get a job with good grades. Good luck!
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lawprof
You guys are all ignoring schools with great LLM programs that feature ADR. The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law has an LLM with a concentration in dispute resolution. Their courses are taught by full-time regular faculty, not adjucts as at so many schools. And the LLM program is small, so you can actually get into the classes you want. Hamline University in St. Paul Minnesota also has a strong dispute resolution faculty and offers an LLM. You need to look beyone the limited list posted on this website!
You guys are all ignoring schools with great LLM programs that feature ADR. The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law has an LLM with a concentration in dispute resolution. Their courses are taught by full-time regular faculty, not adjucts as at so many schools. And the LLM program is small, so you can actually get into the classes you want. Hamline University in St. Paul Minnesota also has a strong dispute resolution faculty and offers an LLM. You need to look beyone the limited list posted on this website!
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Taleju
Hello,

by chance I stumbled on this post. I am thinking of accepting an LL.M. offer on Alternative Dispute Resolution at the Moritz College of Law in Ohio.

Is there anyone who is familiar with the subject and the conditions at Moritz?

Does anyone know, which course I have to take to qualify for the NY Bar Exam?

Greets,

Taleju
Hello,

by chance I stumbled on this post. I am thinking of accepting an LL.M. offer on Alternative Dispute Resolution at the Moritz College of Law in Ohio.

Is there anyone who is familiar with the subject and the conditions at Moritz?

Does anyone know, which course I have to take to qualify for the NY Bar Exam?

Greets,

Taleju
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