advice on LLM applications for good US law school


pumpkin
Hi, I was hoping I could get some advice.

I have a 2:1 LLB from a university in the UK (i'm british). Although i haven't any formally worked within the legal sector, ive completed about 6 work experience placements in my time after university.
I also spent some time in the middle east teaching. (ultimately i wish to go into academia but i feel that i should practice for a while first) I do have a large interest in international law and legal history.

I dont doubt that schools such as harvard/yale (probably all the top 15!) are out of my league.

Any advice on which schools may suit would be greatly appreciated!
Hi, I was hoping I could get some advice.

I have a 2:1 LLB from a university in the UK (i'm british). Although i haven't any formally worked within the legal sector, ive completed about 6 work experience placements in my time after university.
I also spent some time in the middle east teaching. (ultimately i wish to go into academia but i feel that i should practice for a while first) I do have a large interest in international law and legal history.

I dont doubt that schools such as harvard/yale (probably all the top 15!) are out of my league.

Any advice on which schools may suit would be greatly appreciated!

quote
lawandlaw
I went to Tulane without knowing much about it and was very happy with what I got. Of course, rankings are important for your CV when you apply for jobs etc. but ultimately what matters is how much you can get from the school. and i think in principle all US law schools within the top 50 should be good.
Good luck.
I went to Tulane without knowing much about it and was very happy with what I got. Of course, rankings are important for your CV when you apply for jobs etc. but ultimately what matters is how much you can get from the school. and i think in principle all US law schools within the top 50 should be good.
Good luck.
quote
tnuchpiam
Hi Pumkin!

The United States is a very large country. Like nearly everything else here, you can have a vast and varied choice of law schools. Needless to say, if you can get into the Top 10 or even Top 15, that's superb. However, apart from these "finest dozen" or so of top-rank schools, there are many other fine ones.

Moreover, unlike almost all other countries, apart from the types of law programmes, in the United States you can also have a vast and varied choice of other factors -- type and size of places, climate, culture and tradition (the west coast or the New England types, for instance), etc.

I am not an expert on U.S. universities, but my "feeling" is that places like Texas at Austin, Minnesota, or even a southern state like Georgia (whose Law School was founded in the mid-19th century -- certainly one of the oldest in the country) are to me definitely worth your time and money.

My point is that there are many places for you to choose from, and in making your decinsion on any one of them you can take account of many other factors other than the types of Law programmes that suit your academic and/or professional interests.
Hi Pumkin!

The United States is a very large country. Like nearly everything else here, you can have a vast and varied choice of law schools. Needless to say, if you can get into the Top 10 or even Top 15, that's superb. However, apart from these "finest dozen" or so of top-rank schools, there are many other fine ones.

Moreover, unlike almost all other countries, apart from the types of law programmes, in the United States you can also have a vast and varied choice of other factors -- type and size of places, climate, culture and tradition (the west coast or the New England types, for instance), etc.

I am not an expert on U.S. universities, but my "feeling" is that places like Texas at Austin, Minnesota, or even a southern state like Georgia (whose Law School was founded in the mid-19th century -- certainly one of the oldest in the country) are to me definitely worth your time and money.

My point is that there are many places for you to choose from, and in making your decinsion on any one of them you can take account of many other factors other than the types of Law programmes that suit your academic and/or professional interests.
quote
pumpkin
Thanks so much for your replies.

After an LLM I am hoping to sit the New York Bar, obviously getting a job in a good law firm is going to be tougher not having a JD (or a citizenship). I expect the better the university the better my chances of employment would be but does anyone have any idea whether they would even consider looking at me without at least an LLM from a top 10?

Im applying to at least one top 10 but looking at the discussions on here I expect with my credentials my chances are hugely slim.

cheers guys!
Thanks so much for your replies.

After an LLM I am hoping to sit the New York Bar, obviously getting a job in a good law firm is going to be tougher not having a JD (or a citizenship). I expect the better the university the better my chances of employment would be but does anyone have any idea whether they would even consider looking at me without at least an LLM from a top 10?

Im applying to at least one top 10 but looking at the discussions on here I expect with my credentials my chances are hugely slim.

cheers guys!
quote
Stagista11
if I were you, I would try for sure Duke, Cornell, Northwestern, Georgetown and UCLA. I'm confident you'll get at least one positive feedback from these schools. Besides, Fordham, BU, Vanderbilt, USC are great schools too
if I were you, I would try for sure Duke, Cornell, Northwestern, Georgetown and UCLA. I'm confident you'll get at least one positive feedback from these schools. Besides, Fordham, BU, Vanderbilt, USC are great schools too
quote
pumpkin
if I were you, I would try for sure Duke, Cornell, Northwestern, Georgetown and UCLA. I'm confident you'll get at least one positive feedback from these schools. too


Thanks stagista11-i was seriously considering applying to duke and cornell (more as a long shot if anything) but its positive to know I might have a shot.

Is anyone else applying for LLM's at the moment?
<blockquote>if I were you, I would try for sure Duke, Cornell, Northwestern, Georgetown and UCLA. I'm confident you'll get at least one positive feedback from these schools. too</blockquote>

Thanks stagista11-i was seriously considering applying to duke and cornell (more as a long shot if anything) but its positive to know I might have a shot.

Is anyone else applying for LLM's at the moment?
quote
lloydy
Hi, I know this post is like 3 years old but I was wondering whether you actually applied to those law schools and got in eventually. I'm currently studying at the University of Warwick, I'm in my penultimate year and soon going to start applications.
Hi, I know this post is like 3 years old but I was wondering whether you actually applied to those law schools and got in eventually. I'm currently studying at the University of Warwick, I'm in my penultimate year and soon going to start applications.
quote

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