Admissions - Europe/German


Belka
Hi guys,

I passed my first state exam quite recently and wonder if I have a chance of being admitted to CLS? According to the info on their website, they do not only look for high grades but also for work experience, extracurricular activity etc.

So the picture is as follows:
I studied law in Germany at a well-known university (which they definitely know in the US) and passed the first exam probably within 20-25% of my "class".
I passed the first exam with "vollbefriedigend" (Gesamtnote). However, the state exam ("staatlicher Teil") is just above 8 points. I assume this might be quite a downer and basically mean that I stand not the slightest chance of being admitted.

However, I do have some accomplishments: know six languages fluently, was granted a scholarship during my studies and have published and worked part time in my field of interest.

What do you think? Might I stand a chance against the pool of great German law students with a stellar first exam? Or should I try to do better in the second state exam and try then? Or would even this make no sense?

Looking forward to any helpful answers. :)

Belka
Hi guys,

I passed my first state exam quite recently and wonder if I have a chance of being admitted to CLS? According to the info on their website, they do not only look for high grades but also for work experience, extracurricular activity etc.

So the picture is as follows:
I studied law in Germany at a well-known university (which they definitely know in the US) and passed the first exam probably within 20-25% of my "class".
I passed the first exam with "vollbefriedigend" (Gesamtnote). However, the state exam ("staatlicher Teil") is just above 8 points. I assume this might be quite a downer and basically mean that I stand not the slightest chance of being admitted.

However, I do have some accomplishments: know six languages fluently, was granted a scholarship during my studies and have published and worked part time in my field of interest.

What do you think? Might I stand a chance against the pool of great German law students with a stellar first exam? Or should I try to do better in the second state exam and try then? Or would even this make no sense?

Looking forward to any helpful answers. :)

Belka


quote
dbk
Basically, if you have very good/exceptional grades, you'll be admitted at CLS without work experience. If you don't, it'll be very difficult.

I'm French, so I can't tell you about the German candidates, but I have many examples of French ones: good grades + at least one year of work experience and it'll be fine. Otherwise, if you're not among the very first, no...

As far as I'm concerned, I had good grades at the law school + good grades at the business school + 6 months of work experience, and it was no for me last year.
Basically, if you have very good/exceptional grades, you'll be admitted at CLS without work experience. If you don't, it'll be very difficult.

I'm French, so I can't tell you about the German candidates, but I have many examples of French ones: good grades + at least one year of work experience and it'll be fine. Otherwise, if you're not among the very first, no...

As far as I'm concerned, I had good grades at the law school + good grades at the business school + 6 months of work experience, and it was no for me last year.
quote
Dutchman
Dear Belka
I'm from Germany as well (HD) and will start my LLM in a few weeks, so I guess I can give you a few hints.
CLS could indeed be rather hard to get into. NYU generally is much easier, as they usually request 9 points. I don't think that most law school have realized the (major!) difference between the state exam and the "Gesamtnote", or they simply don't pay too much attention to it (yet).

If I were you, however, I wouldn't necessarily apply to the US. The point is: With 8 points in the state exam (don't get me wrong, this really is a very respectable grade; it's just that LLM applications are some kind of "next level"), you probably won't stand a chance in winning a scholarship, and I assume that you've seen the tuition fees in the USA. Great Britain is MUCH (!!!) cheaper, and the good universities are quite reknown as well. You'll have to cross Cambridge (11.5 points) and Oxford (at least 10 points) off your list, but there are some great schools remaining: especially LSE (usually 9 points Gesamtnote), Kings College London (8), UCL (8), Edinbourgh (8).
I had a "gut" in the state exam and the Gesamtnote, but didn't apply to the US, inter alia because competition for LL.M. scholarships is extremely hard and I didn't know whether I'd be able to get one. And even though I did, I'm still really content with my decision (Cambridge), because the scholarships will now cover all the costs, which probably wouldn't have been the case at a comparable law school in the US.

I hope this is of some help to you.
Best of luck
Dutchman
Dear Belka
I'm from Germany as well (HD) and will start my LLM in a few weeks, so I guess I can give you a few hints.
CLS could indeed be rather hard to get into. NYU generally is much easier, as they usually request 9 points. I don't think that most law school have realized the (major!) difference between the state exam and the "Gesamtnote", or they simply don't pay too much attention to it (yet).

If I were you, however, I wouldn't necessarily apply to the US. The point is: With 8 points in the state exam (don't get me wrong, this really is a very respectable grade; it's just that LLM applications are some kind of "next level"), you probably won't stand a chance in winning a scholarship, and I assume that you've seen the tuition fees in the USA. Great Britain is MUCH (!!!) cheaper, and the good universities are quite reknown as well. You'll have to cross Cambridge (11.5 points) and Oxford (at least 10 points) off your list, but there are some great schools remaining: especially LSE (usually 9 points Gesamtnote), Kings College London (8), UCL (8), Edinbourgh (8).
I had a "gut" in the state exam and the Gesamtnote, but didn't apply to the US, inter alia because competition for LL.M. scholarships is extremely hard and I didn't know whether I'd be able to get one. And even though I did, I'm still really content with my decision (Cambridge), because the scholarships will now cover all the costs, which probably wouldn't have been the case at a comparable law school in the US.

I hope this is of some help to you.
Best of luck
Dutchman
quote
Belka
Dear Belka
I'm from Germany as well (HD) and will start my LLM in a few weeks, so I guess I can give you a few hints.
CLS could indeed be rather hard to get into. NYU generally is much easier, as they usually request 9 points. I don't think that most law school have realized the (major!) difference between the state exam and the "Gesamtnote", or they simply don't pay too much attention to it (yet).

If I were you, however, I wouldn't necessarily apply to the US. The point is: With 8 points in the state exam (don't get me wrong, this really is a very respectable grade; it's just that LLM applications are some kind of "next level"), you probably won't stand a chance in winning a scholarship, and I assume that you've seen the tuition fees in the USA. Great Britain is MUCH (!!!) cheaper, and the good universities are quite reknown as well. You'll have to cross Cambridge (11.5 points) and Oxford (at least 10 points) off your list, but there are some great schools remaining: especially LSE (usually 9 points Gesamtnote), Kings College London (8), UCL (8), Edinbourgh (8).
I had a "gut" in the state exam and the Gesamtnote, but didn't apply to the US, inter alia because competition for LL.M. scholarships is extremely hard and I didn't know whether I'd be able to get one. And even though I did, I'm still really content with my decision (Cambridge), because the scholarships will now cover all the costs, which probably wouldn't have been the case at a comparable law school in the US.

I hope this is of some help to you.
Best of luck
Dutchman


Thank you very much for your helpful reply and congrats for being admitted to Cambridge!! That sounds great. :)

Ein Stipendium ist sicherlich ein großer Faktor (eher sogar ein Bestimmungsfaktor) bei meiner Entscheidung für eine Uni. Ich hatte auch an die London-Colleges gedacht und mal schauen...
Andererseits frage ich mich auch, ob sich meine Chancen für ein Stipendium vergrößern könnten, wenn ich zunächst das zweite Examen mache (was dann natürlich besser laufen könnte) und promoviere (was ich eh vorhatte). Was meinst du? Oder ist beim DAAD etwa die Note im ersten Examen das Entscheidungskriterium schlechthin?

Wish you all the best
Belka
<blockquote>Dear Belka
I'm from Germany as well (HD) and will start my LLM in a few weeks, so I guess I can give you a few hints.
CLS could indeed be rather hard to get into. NYU generally is much easier, as they usually request 9 points. I don't think that most law school have realized the (major!) difference between the state exam and the "Gesamtnote", or they simply don't pay too much attention to it (yet).

If I were you, however, I wouldn't necessarily apply to the US. The point is: With 8 points in the state exam (don't get me wrong, this really is a very respectable grade; it's just that LLM applications are some kind of "next level"), you probably won't stand a chance in winning a scholarship, and I assume that you've seen the tuition fees in the USA. Great Britain is MUCH (!!!) cheaper, and the good universities are quite reknown as well. You'll have to cross Cambridge (11.5 points) and Oxford (at least 10 points) off your list, but there are some great schools remaining: especially LSE (usually 9 points Gesamtnote), Kings College London (8), UCL (8), Edinbourgh (8).
I had a "gut" in the state exam and the Gesamtnote, but didn't apply to the US, inter alia because competition for LL.M. scholarships is extremely hard and I didn't know whether I'd be able to get one. And even though I did, I'm still really content with my decision (Cambridge), because the scholarships will now cover all the costs, which probably wouldn't have been the case at a comparable law school in the US.

I hope this is of some help to you.
Best of luck
Dutchman</blockquote>

Thank you very much for your helpful reply and congrats for being admitted to Cambridge!! That sounds great. :)

Ein Stipendium ist sicherlich ein großer Faktor (eher sogar ein Bestimmungsfaktor) bei meiner Entscheidung für eine Uni. Ich hatte auch an die London-Colleges gedacht und mal schauen...
Andererseits frage ich mich auch, ob sich meine Chancen für ein Stipendium vergrößern könnten, wenn ich zunächst das zweite Examen mache (was dann natürlich besser laufen könnte) und promoviere (was ich eh vorhatte). Was meinst du? Oder ist beim DAAD etwa die Note im ersten Examen das Entscheidungskriterium schlechthin?

Wish you all the best
Belka
quote
Dutchman
To all: We'll be switching to German here, as we're discussing only German grade issues and German scholarships.

Hi Belka,
beim DAAD ist die Note bei weitem nicht das einzige Kriterium (Engagement, Berufsziele, ggf. Promotionsprojekt sind auch sehr wichtig), aber nichtsdestotrotz trifft man dort fast nur Leute mit zweistelligem Schnitt an. Es gibt noch irgendwo hier auf dieser Seite (ich glaube auch unter USA) einen Thread mit DAAD-Erfahrungsberichten, den Du Dir bei Interesse durchlesen solltest.
Bei mir saßen 4 oder 5 Professoren im Auswahlkommittee, und die haben mir ausdrücklich gesagt, dass sie die Staatsnote für wichtiger erachten (ich bin einer der Fälle, die vom Schwerpunkt etwas runtergezogen werden). Wenn ich mir die Leute, die im Endeffekt genommen wurden, vergegenwärtige, befürchte ich, dass die Chancen dort auch mit knapp über neun nicht allzu hoch sein dürften. Ich kenne Leute, die mit über 12 im Staatsteil abgelehnt wurden (und auch sozial eigentlich recht kompetent sind).
Leider habe ich keine allzu großen Erfahrungen damit, ob die Note des zweiten Examens hier etwas ändert, gerade da es sich um ein deutsches Stipendium handelt, kann das aber sehr gut sein. Wie gesagt, regelmäßig sind die Leute beim DAAD schon zweistellig, zumindest bei den Standardzielen USA/UK.
Wenn Du in BaWü Examen gemacht hast, vergibt die Landesstiftung auch Stipendien, da könntest Du im Auslandsamt Deiner Uni mal nachhaken (eigentlich wollen die nur Austauschvereinbarungen, aber das wird häufig auch sehr sehr weit gehandhabt). Die Anforderungen sind bei weitem nicht so hoch wie beim DAAD, allerdings gibt es auch "nur" 6000 Euro. Ich musste das dortige Stipendium leider wegen DAAD-Förderung ausschlagen. Das Freshfields Reisestipendium hingegen ist ebenfalls sehr kompetitiv, von der Studienstiftung ganz zu schweigen (ähnlich wie DAAD).

Natürlich hast Du evtl. Chancen, an etwas kleineren USA-Unis einen waiver zu bekommen, was die Kosten deutlich drücken kann. Für die Ivy League sieht das aber ohne "gut" eher düster aus. Letztlich wirst Du in den USA auf jeden Fall deutlich mehr bezahlen als im UK. Das gilt aber regelmäßig sogar mit Stipendium. Die London Colleges (zumindest LSE, UCL, KCL) sind ja auch vom Renommee nicht schlechter als manch eine amerikanische Uni. An Deiner Stelle würde ich wohl vornehmlich die LSE anpeilen: Ein ambitioniertes Ziel, aber m.E. auch das hierzulande für den LLM renommierteste London College.
Ohnehin könntest Du angesichts der Bewerbungsfristen erst 2011/12 den LLM machen (Vorsicht: Für die USA könnten einige Fristen demnächst schon ablaufen), daher musst Du wohl ohnehin überlegen, was Du bis dahin machst. Eine Promotion zu beginnen, ist sicher keine schlechte Idee, wenn Du das ohnehin vor hast, letztlich musst Du diese Entscheidung aber selbst treffen.
Im UK scheint vorherige Arbeitserfahrung für die LLM-Bewerbung übrigens nicht allzu wichtig zu sein.
Viel Erfolg!
To all: We'll be switching to German here, as we're discussing only German grade issues and German scholarships.

Hi Belka,
beim DAAD ist die Note bei weitem nicht das einzige Kriterium (Engagement, Berufsziele, ggf. Promotionsprojekt sind auch sehr wichtig), aber nichtsdestotrotz trifft man dort fast nur Leute mit zweistelligem Schnitt an. Es gibt noch irgendwo hier auf dieser Seite (ich glaube auch unter USA) einen Thread mit DAAD-Erfahrungsberichten, den Du Dir bei Interesse durchlesen solltest.
Bei mir saßen 4 oder 5 Professoren im Auswahlkommittee, und die haben mir ausdrücklich gesagt, dass sie die Staatsnote für wichtiger erachten (ich bin einer der Fälle, die vom Schwerpunkt etwas runtergezogen werden). Wenn ich mir die Leute, die im Endeffekt genommen wurden, vergegenwärtige, befürchte ich, dass die Chancen dort auch mit knapp über neun nicht allzu hoch sein dürften. Ich kenne Leute, die mit über 12 im Staatsteil abgelehnt wurden (und auch sozial eigentlich recht kompetent sind).
Leider habe ich keine allzu großen Erfahrungen damit, ob die Note des zweiten Examens hier etwas ändert, gerade da es sich um ein deutsches Stipendium handelt, kann das aber sehr gut sein. Wie gesagt, regelmäßig sind die Leute beim DAAD schon zweistellig, zumindest bei den Standardzielen USA/UK.
Wenn Du in BaWü Examen gemacht hast, vergibt die Landesstiftung auch Stipendien, da könntest Du im Auslandsamt Deiner Uni mal nachhaken (eigentlich wollen die nur Austauschvereinbarungen, aber das wird häufig auch sehr sehr weit gehandhabt). Die Anforderungen sind bei weitem nicht so hoch wie beim DAAD, allerdings gibt es auch "nur" 6000 Euro. Ich musste das dortige Stipendium leider wegen DAAD-Förderung ausschlagen. Das Freshfields Reisestipendium hingegen ist ebenfalls sehr kompetitiv, von der Studienstiftung ganz zu schweigen (ähnlich wie DAAD).

Natürlich hast Du evtl. Chancen, an etwas kleineren USA-Unis einen waiver zu bekommen, was die Kosten deutlich drücken kann. Für die Ivy League sieht das aber ohne "gut" eher düster aus. Letztlich wirst Du in den USA auf jeden Fall deutlich mehr bezahlen als im UK. Das gilt aber regelmäßig sogar mit Stipendium. Die London Colleges (zumindest LSE, UCL, KCL) sind ja auch vom Renommee nicht schlechter als manch eine amerikanische Uni. An Deiner Stelle würde ich wohl vornehmlich die LSE anpeilen: Ein ambitioniertes Ziel, aber m.E. auch das hierzulande für den LLM renommierteste London College.
Ohnehin könntest Du angesichts der Bewerbungsfristen erst 2011/12 den LLM machen (Vorsicht: Für die USA könnten einige Fristen demnächst schon ablaufen), daher musst Du wohl ohnehin überlegen, was Du bis dahin machst. Eine Promotion zu beginnen, ist sicher keine schlechte Idee, wenn Du das ohnehin vor hast, letztlich musst Du diese Entscheidung aber selbst treffen.
Im UK scheint vorherige Arbeitserfahrung für die LLM-Bewerbung übrigens nicht allzu wichtig zu sein.
Viel Erfolg!
quote
Belka
To all: We'll be switching to German here, as we're discussing only German grade issues and German scholarships.

Hi Belka,
beim DAAD ist die Note bei weitem nicht das einzige Kriterium (Engagement, Berufsziele, ggf. Promotionsprojekt sind auch sehr wichtig), aber nichtsdestotrotz trifft man dort fast nur Leute mit zweistelligem Schnitt an. Es gibt noch irgendwo hier auf dieser Seite (ich glaube auch unter USA) einen Thread mit DAAD-Erfahrungsberichten, den Du Dir bei Interesse durchlesen solltest.
Bei mir saßen 4 oder 5 Professoren im Auswahlkommittee, und die haben mir ausdrücklich gesagt, dass sie die Staatsnote für wichtiger erachten (ich bin einer der Fälle, die vom Schwerpunkt etwas runtergezogen werden). Wenn ich mir die Leute, die im Endeffekt genommen wurden, vergegenwärtige, befürchte ich, dass die Chancen dort auch mit knapp über neun nicht allzu hoch sein dürften. Ich kenne Leute, die mit über 12 im Staatsteil abgelehnt wurden (und auch sozial eigentlich recht kompetent sind).
Leider habe ich keine allzu großen Erfahrungen damit, ob die Note des zweiten Examens hier etwas ändert, gerade da es sich um ein deutsches Stipendium handelt, kann das aber sehr gut sein. Wie gesagt, regelmäßig sind die Leute beim DAAD schon zweistellig, zumindest bei den Standardzielen USA/UK.
Wenn Du in BaWü Examen gemacht hast, vergibt die Landesstiftung auch Stipendien, da könntest Du im Auslandsamt Deiner Uni mal nachhaken (eigentlich wollen die nur Austauschvereinbarungen, aber das wird häufig auch sehr sehr weit gehandhabt). Die Anforderungen sind bei weitem nicht so hoch wie beim DAAD, allerdings gibt es auch "nur" 6000 Euro. Ich musste das dortige Stipendium leider wegen DAAD-Förderung ausschlagen. Das Freshfields Reisestipendium hingegen ist ebenfalls sehr kompetitiv, von der Studienstiftung ganz zu schweigen (ähnlich wie DAAD).

Natürlich hast Du evtl. Chancen, an etwas kleineren USA-Unis einen waiver zu bekommen, was die Kosten deutlich drücken kann. Für die Ivy League sieht das aber ohne "gut" eher düster aus. Letztlich wirst Du in den USA auf jeden Fall deutlich mehr bezahlen als im UK. Das gilt aber regelmäßig sogar mit Stipendium. Die London Colleges (zumindest LSE, UCL, KCL) sind ja auch vom Renommee nicht schlechter als manch eine amerikanische Uni. An Deiner Stelle würde ich wohl vornehmlich die LSE anpeilen: Ein ambitioniertes Ziel, aber m.E. auch das hierzulande für den LLM renommierteste London College.
Ohnehin könntest Du angesichts der Bewerbungsfristen erst 2011/12 den LLM machen (Vorsicht: Für die USA könnten einige Fristen demnächst schon ablaufen), daher musst Du wohl ohnehin überlegen, was Du bis dahin machst. Eine Promotion zu beginnen, ist sicher keine schlechte Idee, wenn Du das ohnehin vor hast, letztlich musst Du diese Entscheidung aber selbst treffen.
Im UK scheint vorherige Arbeitserfahrung für die LLM-Bewerbung übrigens nicht allzu wichtig zu sein.
Viel Erfolg!


Hallo Dutchman,

habe erneut vielen Dank für Deine ausführliche, wirklich hilfreiche und realistische Antwort. Ich werde erstmal ins Referendariat gehen. Und danach werde ich versuchen, einen LLM über ein Stipendium zu finanzieren. Wenn das nicht klappt, dann muss ich in den saueren Apfel beißen ... und das aus eigener Kraft finanzieren.

Dir auch viel Erfolg!!
<blockquote>To all: We'll be switching to German here, as we're discussing only German grade issues and German scholarships.

Hi Belka,
beim DAAD ist die Note bei weitem nicht das einzige Kriterium (Engagement, Berufsziele, ggf. Promotionsprojekt sind auch sehr wichtig), aber nichtsdestotrotz trifft man dort fast nur Leute mit zweistelligem Schnitt an. Es gibt noch irgendwo hier auf dieser Seite (ich glaube auch unter USA) einen Thread mit DAAD-Erfahrungsberichten, den Du Dir bei Interesse durchlesen solltest.
Bei mir saßen 4 oder 5 Professoren im Auswahlkommittee, und die haben mir ausdrücklich gesagt, dass sie die Staatsnote für wichtiger erachten (ich bin einer der Fälle, die vom Schwerpunkt etwas runtergezogen werden). Wenn ich mir die Leute, die im Endeffekt genommen wurden, vergegenwärtige, befürchte ich, dass die Chancen dort auch mit knapp über neun nicht allzu hoch sein dürften. Ich kenne Leute, die mit über 12 im Staatsteil abgelehnt wurden (und auch sozial eigentlich recht kompetent sind).
Leider habe ich keine allzu großen Erfahrungen damit, ob die Note des zweiten Examens hier etwas ändert, gerade da es sich um ein deutsches Stipendium handelt, kann das aber sehr gut sein. Wie gesagt, regelmäßig sind die Leute beim DAAD schon zweistellig, zumindest bei den Standardzielen USA/UK.
Wenn Du in BaWü Examen gemacht hast, vergibt die Landesstiftung auch Stipendien, da könntest Du im Auslandsamt Deiner Uni mal nachhaken (eigentlich wollen die nur Austauschvereinbarungen, aber das wird häufig auch sehr sehr weit gehandhabt). Die Anforderungen sind bei weitem nicht so hoch wie beim DAAD, allerdings gibt es auch "nur" 6000 Euro. Ich musste das dortige Stipendium leider wegen DAAD-Förderung ausschlagen. Das Freshfields Reisestipendium hingegen ist ebenfalls sehr kompetitiv, von der Studienstiftung ganz zu schweigen (ähnlich wie DAAD).

Natürlich hast Du evtl. Chancen, an etwas kleineren USA-Unis einen waiver zu bekommen, was die Kosten deutlich drücken kann. Für die Ivy League sieht das aber ohne "gut" eher düster aus. Letztlich wirst Du in den USA auf jeden Fall deutlich mehr bezahlen als im UK. Das gilt aber regelmäßig sogar mit Stipendium. Die London Colleges (zumindest LSE, UCL, KCL) sind ja auch vom Renommee nicht schlechter als manch eine amerikanische Uni. An Deiner Stelle würde ich wohl vornehmlich die LSE anpeilen: Ein ambitioniertes Ziel, aber m.E. auch das hierzulande für den LLM renommierteste London College.
Ohnehin könntest Du angesichts der Bewerbungsfristen erst 2011/12 den LLM machen (Vorsicht: Für die USA könnten einige Fristen demnächst schon ablaufen), daher musst Du wohl ohnehin überlegen, was Du bis dahin machst. Eine Promotion zu beginnen, ist sicher keine schlechte Idee, wenn Du das ohnehin vor hast, letztlich musst Du diese Entscheidung aber selbst treffen.
Im UK scheint vorherige Arbeitserfahrung für die LLM-Bewerbung übrigens nicht allzu wichtig zu sein.
Viel Erfolg!</blockquote>

Hallo Dutchman,

habe erneut vielen Dank für Deine ausführliche, wirklich hilfreiche und realistische Antwort. Ich werde erstmal ins Referendariat gehen. Und danach werde ich versuchen, einen LLM über ein Stipendium zu finanzieren. Wenn das nicht klappt, dann muss ich in den saueren Apfel beißen ... und das aus eigener Kraft finanzieren.

Dir auch viel Erfolg!!
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

New York City, New York 1092 Followers 955 Discussions
New York City, New York 1672 Followers 1488 Discussions
Cambridge, United Kingdom 578 Followers 673 Discussions
Oxford, United Kingdom 632 Followers 755 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 546 Followers 838 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 631 Followers 853 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 473 Followers 844 Discussions
Edinburgh, United Kingdom 317 Followers 444 Discussions