QMUL x UCL - LLM in Banking and Finance


csaa26

Hi everyone,

I am currently holding an offer from QMUL for the LLM in Banking and Finance and I am waiting for an answer from UCL for their LLM in International Banking and Finance.

Whilst waiting an answer from UCL, what do you think about the 45-credits for each module in UCL programme?

Currently it is possible to take up to three modules of 45-credits plus the dissertation with classes during the first and second terms in UCL, while others law schools offer five to seven modules of 30-credits (or 0,5 out of 4,0 in the LSE) divided into two terms.

In the past, UCL had credit scheme similar to others law schools, but it has changed due to reduction in timeframe (LLM in 10 months instead 12 months).

Despite the higher rank and everything else (I will return to my home country and the reputation are equivalent and the professors look great in both schools), I am keen on accepting the offer from QMUL as there I can have a more comprehensive study in Banking and Finance topics.

What do you think about the teaching in UCL with this credit scheme? Is it worth for learning?

Is anyone else considering others law schools over UCL for the same reason?

Thank you for your thoughts.

Hi everyone,

I am currently holding an offer from QMUL for the LLM in Banking and Finance and I am waiting for an answer from UCL for their LLM in International Banking and Finance.

Whilst waiting an answer from UCL, what do you think about the 45-credits for each module in UCL programme?

Currently it is possible to take up to three modules of 45-credits plus the dissertation with classes during the first and second terms in UCL, while others law schools offer five to seven modules of 30-credits (or 0,5 out of 4,0 in the LSE) divided into two terms.

In the past, UCL had credit scheme similar to others law schools, but it has changed due to reduction in timeframe (LLM in 10 months instead 12 months).

Despite the higher rank and everything else (I will return to my home country and the reputation are equivalent and the professors look great in both schools), I am keen on accepting the offer from QMUL as there I can have a more comprehensive study in Banking and Finance topics.

What do you think about the teaching in UCL with this credit scheme? Is it worth for learning?

Is anyone else considering others law schools over UCL for the same reason?

Thank you for your thoughts.
quote
phil96

Hi,

1. Re the module credit-bearing system. Every university in the UK has a different credit calculation system. But normally, there are two types of modules: full modules and half modules. Full modules run over two semesters/terms and half modules are taught over one semester. So a 45 credit course at UCL is considered a full module and a 22.5 credit one is a half module. Full modules are very common for undergrads. For example, all of my LLB courses at QMUL, but 2, were full-module courses. 

The good thing about full modules is that you will probably have fewer summer exams and summative assignments. An LLM student at LSE can potentially sit 7 exams in the summer (provided that he didn't choose any essay-assessed modules), but you will only need to sit 3 or 4. And trust me, sitting 7 exams over the summer is not great. 

The good thing about half modules is that you will have the flexibility to choose more courses. Also, if you have a terrible lecturer, you won't have to stuck with him for the entire year. 

2. Re QMUL v UCL. I did my LLB at QMUL, and I regret to say that everyone I know who went to QMUL was not happy about their time at the university. By contrast, people I know who went to UCL generally had a great time there. But if you are doing an LLM at QM, you will probably be taught at the Lincoln's Inn campus rather than the Mile End one. So maybe you will find yourself happier there. 

Hi,<br><br>1. Re the module credit-bearing system. Every university in the UK has a different credit calculation system. But normally, there are two types of modules: full modules and half modules. Full modules run over two semesters/terms and half modules are taught over one semester. So a 45 credit course at UCL is considered a full module and a 22.5 credit one is a half module. Full modules are very common for undergrads. For example, all of my LLB courses at QMUL, but 2, were full-module courses.&nbsp;<br><br>The good thing about full modules is that you will probably have fewer summer exams and summative assignments. An LLM student at LSE can potentially sit 7 exams in the summer (provided that he didn't choose any essay-assessed modules), but you will only need to sit 3 or 4. And trust me, sitting 7 exams over the summer is not great.&nbsp;<br><br>The good thing about half modules is that you will have the flexibility to choose more courses. Also, if you have a terrible lecturer, you won't have to stuck with him for the entire year.&nbsp;<br><br>2. Re QMUL v UCL. I did my LLB at QMUL, and I regret to say that everyone I know who went to QMUL was not happy about their time at the university. By contrast, people I know who went to UCL generally had a great time there. But if you are doing an LLM at QM, you will probably be taught at the Lincoln's Inn campus rather than the Mile End one. So maybe you will find yourself happier there.&nbsp;
quote
csaa26

Thanks for sharing your experience. Helped me a lot to understand the UK credit system.

I will do an LLM at QMUL, so the classes will be taught at the Lincoln's Inn, centre London. Did you have any other complaints regarding QMUL beyond the other campus location?

Do you know or had classes with the professors George Walker, Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal, Constanza Russo or Rosa Lastra? Do they have a good teaching?

Hi,

1. Re the module credit-bearing system. Every university in the UK has a different credit calculation system. But normally, there are two types of modules: full modules and half modules. Full modules run over two semesters/terms and half modules are taught over one semester. So a 45 credit course at UCL is considered a full module and a 22.5 credit one is a half module. Full modules are very common for undergrads. For example, all of my LLB courses at QMUL, but 2, were full-module courses. 

The good thing about full modules is that you will probably have fewer summer exams and summative assignments. An LLM student at LSE can potentially sit 7 exams in the summer (provided that he didn't choose any essay-assessed modules), but you will only need to sit 3 or 4. And trust me, sitting 7 exams over the summer is not great. 

The good thing about half modules is that you will have the flexibility to choose more courses. Also, if you have a terrible lecturer, you won't have to stuck with him for the entire year. 

2. Re QMUL v UCL. I did my LLB at QMUL, and I regret to say that everyone I know who went to QMUL was not happy about their time at the university. By contrast, people I know who went to UCL generally had a great time there. But if you are doing an LLM at QM, you will probably be taught at the Lincoln's Inn campus rather than the Mile End one. So maybe you will find yourself happier there. 

Thanks for sharing your experience. Helped me a lot to understand the UK credit system.<br><br><div>I will do an LLM at QMUL, so the classes will be taught at the Lincoln's Inn, centre London. Did you have any other complaints regarding QMUL beyond the other campus location?<br><br>Do you know or had classes with the professors George Walker, Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal, Constanza Russo or Rosa Lastra? Do they have a good teaching?<br><br>[quote]Hi,<br><br>1. Re the module credit-bearing system. Every university in the UK has a different credit calculation system. But normally, there are two types of modules: full modules and half modules. Full modules run over two semesters/terms and half modules are taught over one semester. So a 45 credit course at UCL is considered a full module and a 22.5 credit one is a half module. Full modules are very common for undergrads. For example, all of my LLB courses at QMUL, but 2, were full-module courses.&nbsp;<br><br>The good thing about full modules is that you will probably have fewer summer exams and summative assignments. An LLM student at LSE can potentially sit 7 exams in the summer (provided that he didn't choose any essay-assessed modules), but you will only need to sit 3 or 4. And trust me, sitting 7 exams over the summer is not great.&nbsp;<br><br>The good thing about half modules is that you will have the flexibility to choose more courses. Also, if you have a terrible lecturer, you won't have to stuck with him for the entire year.&nbsp;<br><br>2. Re QMUL v UCL. I did my LLB at QMUL, and I regret to say that everyone I know who went to QMUL was not happy about their time at the university. By contrast, people I know who went to UCL generally had a great time there. But if you are doing an LLM at QM, you will probably be taught at the Lincoln's Inn campus rather than the Mile End one. So maybe you will find yourself happier there.&nbsp; [/quote]</div>
quote

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