Oxford, Cambridge, LSE Chances


cobi
Hi all, I am an American lawyer holding a JD from a Top 20 school (ranked by USNEWS). I had a GPA of 3.7 (Top 11%) but my undergraduate grades were average (3.0) and went to an average big state university. I have worked for 2 years as a Litigator and I now work for an international known firm which I think is well recognized in England. I was not on a journal but was invited and was on moot court and did trial competitions. Does anyone know what my chances are at Oxford, Cambridge or LSE to get an LLM?? Anyone in the same boat and was accepted? Thanks.
Hi all, I am an American lawyer holding a JD from a Top 20 school (ranked by USNEWS). I had a GPA of 3.7 (Top 11%) but my undergraduate grades were average (3.0) and went to an average big state university. I have worked for 2 years as a Litigator and I now work for an international known firm which I think is well recognized in England. I was not on a journal but was invited and was on moot court and did trial competitions. Does anyone know what my chances are at Oxford, Cambridge or LSE to get an LLM?? Anyone in the same boat and was accepted? Thanks.

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Lanny
My law school grades from a Canadian university were not as high as yours and I was accepted into LSE so I am sure you will not have much trouble.
My law school grades from a Canadian university were not as high as yours and I was accepted into LSE so I am sure you will not have much trouble.
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hey lanny! congrats on the LSE admission. have a few questions to ask. firstly how do they translate the grades you've obtained in Canada to meet their requirements. secondly, were you required to submit some academic writing (apart from your essay) and lastly did you also apply to UCL and Kings? If so why did you choose LSE (assuming you've taken LSE). thanks and good luck!
hey lanny! congrats on the LSE admission. have a few questions to ask. firstly how do they translate the grades you've obtained in Canada to meet their requirements. secondly, were you required to submit some academic writing (apart from your essay) and lastly did you also apply to UCL and Kings? If so why did you choose LSE (assuming you've taken LSE). thanks and good luck!
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supervin
Hi all.

Does anyone know what the realistic typical requirements are for each of the three universities - Ox, Cam and LSE? This is in terms of an undergraduate law degree standard - i.e. 1st or 2:1.

Obviously, the Oxford BCL would be the most difficult one to get into comparatively and would demand the highest standards, i.e. a first most likely.

Is there some sort of (hidden) cut-off percentage in regard to the expected average overall mark? Like for instance, do these universities refuse to consider/accept an applicant with an average overall mark of less than X percent within the 2:1 range (60-69%), or would they consider any 2:1 or above applicant (60+%)?

Do the universities mind a lot about the first year results, consider the first and second year results equally or mind a lot about the second year ones?

How about A-levels - how important are they?

Also, what about work experience or extra-curricula?

Many thanks.
Hi all.

Does anyone know what the realistic typical requirements are for each of the three universities - Ox, Cam and LSE? This is in terms of an undergraduate law degree standard - i.e. 1st or 2:1.

Obviously, the Oxford BCL would be the most difficult one to get into comparatively and would demand the highest standards, i.e. a first most likely.

Is there some sort of (hidden) cut-off percentage in regard to the expected average overall mark? Like for instance, do these universities refuse to consider/accept an applicant with an average overall mark of less than X percent within the 2:1 range (60-69%), or would they consider any 2:1 or above applicant (60+%)?

Do the universities mind a lot about the first year results, consider the first and second year results equally or mind a lot about the second year ones?

How about A-levels - how important are they?

Also, what about work experience or extra-curricula?

Many thanks.
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Yellow
Oxford - 1st
Cambridge - Offers made requiring either a 1st or a 67% probably depending on your results the year prior to application if you had a 1st they may give you an offer of 67 and vice versa
LSE - 2.1
I don't think your earlier results come into play although if you apply prior to actually graduating your most recent results will be what counts and they are not likely to offer a place unless you meet the academic standards above.
With regard to work experience etc I think grades are the most important factor if you don't have them forget it. However Cambridge for example only offers between 10-20% of applicants places chances are they reject many applicants who are well qualified and in that environment anything you can produce to prove that you are worthy of a place over somebody as well academically qualified must be worth something.
Oxford - 1st
Cambridge - Offers made requiring either a 1st or a 67% probably depending on your results the year prior to application if you had a 1st they may give you an offer of 67 and vice versa
LSE - 2.1
I don't think your earlier results come into play although if you apply prior to actually graduating your most recent results will be what counts and they are not likely to offer a place unless you meet the academic standards above.
With regard to work experience etc I think grades are the most important factor if you don't have them forget it. However Cambridge for example only offers between 10-20% of applicants places chances are they reject many applicants who are well qualified and in that environment anything you can produce to prove that you are worthy of a place over somebody as well academically qualified must be worth something.
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pinky
Does anybody know if Ox, Camb admits non-law degree holder with CPE? If so will they assess on basis of the non-law degree or will need to have a good CPE also? Thanks
Does anybody know if Ox, Camb admits non-law degree holder with CPE? If so will they assess on basis of the non-law degree or will need to have a good CPE also? Thanks
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Yellow
The stance that they seem to take is that they will only admit people w/o a law degree in "exceptional" circumstances. I'm not altogether sure what that means. I would say however that it probably involves some sort of research-based work experience in a legal field. Quite possibly of a long duration. I would maybe give them a ring to see because there's probably little point in applying if your application form will go straight into the bin.
The stance that they seem to take is that they will only admit people w/o a law degree in "exceptional" circumstances. I'm not altogether sure what that means. I would say however that it probably involves some sort of research-based work experience in a legal field. Quite possibly of a long duration. I would maybe give them a ring to see because there's probably little point in applying if your application form will go straight into the bin.
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pinky
For the LSE, it prescirbed that CPE applicansts will be considered:

As a guide, students should have a minimum of a good degree in law (for example, a good upper second class English LLB, or good results in the French Maîtrise en droit, or a high grade point average in the American JD), or a good degree in another discipline together with an appropriate professional qualification in law (such as the CPE).

However Ox bridge don't have such details.
For the LSE, it prescirbed that CPE applicansts will be considered:

As a guide, students should have a minimum of a good degree in law (for example, a good upper second class English LLB, or good results in the French Maîtrise en droit, or a high grade point average in the American JD), or a good degree in another discipline together with an appropriate professional qualification in law (such as the CPE).

However Ox bridge don't have such details.
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subslaw
hi everyone
I am also applying to OX, Cam, Lse apart form UCL and SOAS... can anyone tell me which r the good coleges in ox and cam for human rights course and which offer the maximum funding. I found the website too confusing. I also have uppersecond class and 11/2 year work experience but in teh corporate law field will afect my chances fro making the shift to Human Rights.
hi everyone
I am also applying to OX, Cam, Lse apart form UCL and SOAS... can anyone tell me which r the good coleges in ox and cam for human rights course and which offer the maximum funding. I found the website too confusing. I also have uppersecond class and 11/2 year work experience but in teh corporate law field will afect my chances fro making the shift to Human Rights.
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I'd have thought that admission to the LSE LLM is significantly less competitive than the BCL or LLM (Cantab).

Supervin - For the BCL, I reckon you'd have bugger all chance with anything less than a First. You'd have to be pretty exceptional without one. That's not to say that a First is sufficient - far from it.

The Faculty means what it says in its qualitative selection criteria; - see particularly "Reasoning Ability":

Reasoning ability: outstanding analytical abilities, including the ability to draw and maintain fine distinctions, the ability speedily to separate the relevant from the irrelevant, and the ability to develop and sustain complex arguments under pressure; capacities for accurate observation and insightful criticism, including willingness and ability to engage with disciplines other than law and to bring their insights to bear on legal problems; originality and creativity of thought, open-mindedness, and capacity for lateral thinking; excellent powers of synthesis and economy of thought.
I'd have thought that admission to the LSE LLM is significantly less competitive than the BCL or LLM (Cantab).

Supervin - For the BCL, I reckon you'd have bugger all chance with anything less than a First. You'd have to be pretty exceptional without one. That's not to say that a First is sufficient - far from it.

The Faculty means what it says in its qualitative selection criteria; - see particularly "Reasoning Ability":

Reasoning ability: outstanding analytical abilities, including the ability to draw and maintain fine distinctions, the ability speedily to separate the relevant from the irrelevant, and the ability to develop and sustain complex arguments under pressure; capacities for accurate observation and insightful criticism, including willingness and ability to engage with disciplines other than law and to bring their insights to bear on legal problems; originality and creativity of thought, open-mindedness, and capacity for lateral thinking; excellent powers of synthesis and economy of thought.
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Sami
I understand that it is very difficult to secure admission in Cambridge or Oxford. But i know a few students who told me that few colleges are easier to get through and few are quite tough !!

I have a 2:1 with 65% average and completed my PgDL(BVC) with 70%+. I am qualified to practice in two judiciaries. I have been working for a law firm for 6 months now. Could any current students at either of these Uni suggest which college should i apply to, given that you can only apply for two colleges.

Cheers !
I understand that it is very difficult to secure admission in Cambridge or Oxford. But i know a few students who told me that few colleges are easier to get through and few are quite tough !!

I have a 2:1 with 65% average and completed my PgDL(BVC) with 70%+. I am qualified to practice in two judiciaries. I have been working for a law firm for 6 months now. Could any current students at either of these Uni suggest which college should i apply to, given that you can only apply for two colleges.

Cheers !
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Nina N.
Sami, I am sorry to tell you that at graduate level, it does not matter at all which college you apply to since it is the law faculty deciding on your admission - both in Ox and Cam. Only once you have an offer from the faculty, your application will be sent to the colleges in order to find you a college place. What the students told you only applies at undergraduate level where the colleges are responsible for the selection of their students.
Sami, I am sorry to tell you that at graduate level, it does not matter at all which college you apply to since it is the law faculty deciding on your admission - both in Ox and Cam. Only once you have an offer from the faculty, your application will be sent to the colleges in order to find you a college place. What the students told you only applies at undergraduate level where the colleges are responsible for the selection of their students.
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Mats
@Sami: Nina N. is entirely correct - whether or not you get a place on the BCL (or LLM) as such depends solely on the Faculty and not on the College(s) that you have named in your application form. Your choice is relevant only insofar as you might want to apply to a less popular College to be sure to get a place there instead of having your application passed around until another College finally accepts you.

I don't want to discourage you from applying to Oxbridge: If you really want to go there, you certainly should give it a try. But bear in mind that with a mid-2:1 you will be fighting an uphill battle. Getting 70%+ (ie. a "very competent") in the BVC is unlikely to improve your chances significantly as it is perhaps a little unrealisitic to assume that a this grade will be considered equivalent to a First Class - this is not only because most people on the BVC manage to get a "very competent", but (I think) also because the BVC is by definition a purely vocational - rather than an academic - course.
@Sami: Nina N. is entirely correct - whether or not you get a place on the BCL (or LLM) as such depends solely on the Faculty and not on the College(s) that you have named in your application form. Your choice is relevant only insofar as you might want to apply to a less popular College to be sure to get a place there instead of having your application passed around until another College finally accepts you.

I don't want to discourage you from applying to Oxbridge: If you really want to go there, you certainly should give it a try. But bear in mind that with a mid-2:1 you will be fighting an uphill battle. Getting 70%+ (ie. a "very competent") in the BVC is unlikely to improve your chances significantly as it is perhaps a little unrealisitic to assume that a this grade will be considered equivalent to a First Class - this is not only because most people on the BVC manage to get a "very competent", but (I think) also because the BVC is by definition a purely vocational - rather than an academic - course.
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iam studying at a national level reputed law school in india.i have a few paper presentations and some articles and a GPA of 6. do i have any chances of getting into harvard for concentration taxation llm course or in oxford or LSe for any llm course
iam studying at a national level reputed law school in india.i have a few paper presentations and some articles and a GPA of 6. do i have any chances of getting into harvard for concentration taxation llm course or in oxford or LSe for any llm course
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Johnson
I think it is easier to go to LSE than to go to Cambridge or Oxford.
I think it is easier to go to LSE than to go to Cambridge or Oxford.
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I am ranked 30/100 students in my law school and have one reputed international publication. Any idea about BCL Oxford?
I am ranked 30/100 students in my law school and have one reputed international publication. Any idea about BCL Oxford?
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Good Gosh
Does anybody know if Ox, Camb admits non-law degree holder with CPE? If so will they assess on basis of the non-law degree or will need to have a good CPE also? Thanks


oxford certainly does admit non-lawyers who have taken the CPE (as I know several who have done the BCL). as does the LSE and UCL. I'm unsure about cambridge, however.
<blockquote>Does anybody know if Ox, Camb admits non-law degree holder with CPE? If so will they assess on basis of the non-law degree or will need to have a good CPE also? Thanks</blockquote>

oxford certainly does admit non-lawyers who have taken the CPE (as I know several who have done the BCL). as does the LSE and UCL. I'm unsure about cambridge, however.
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P_Martini
I think it is easier to go to LSE than to go to Cambridge or Oxford.


Yes. That's absolutely true.
<blockquote>I think it is easier to go to LSE than to go to Cambridge or Oxford.</blockquote>

Yes. That's absolutely true.
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krof
Oxford - 1st
Cambridge - Offers made requiring either a 1st or a 67% probably depending on your results the year prior to application if you had a 1st they may give you an offer of 67 and vice versa
LSE - 2.1
I don't think your earlier results come into play although if you apply prior to actually graduating your most recent results will be what counts and they are not likely to offer a place unless you meet the academic standards above.
With regard to work experience etc I think grades are the most important factor if you don't have them forget it. However Cambridge for example only offers between 10-20% of applicants places chances are they reject many applicants who are well qualified and in that environment anything you can produce to prove that you are worthy of a place over somebody as well academically qualified must be worth something.


I agree with your reasoning. Just a doubt: why does Cambridge post on its website that they receive around 1,000 applications and make 350-400 offers? That would mean, factoring in some generosity, at least a 30% admission rate.
Do you think they purposefully underestimate the selectivity of the programme?
<blockquote>Oxford - 1st
Cambridge - Offers made requiring either a 1st or a 67% probably depending on your results the year prior to application if you had a 1st they may give you an offer of 67 and vice versa
LSE - 2.1
I don't think your earlier results come into play although if you apply prior to actually graduating your most recent results will be what counts and they are not likely to offer a place unless you meet the academic standards above.
With regard to work experience etc I think grades are the most important factor if you don't have them forget it. However Cambridge for example only offers between 10-20% of applicants places chances are they reject many applicants who are well qualified and in that environment anything you can produce to prove that you are worthy of a place over somebody as well academically qualified must be worth something.</blockquote>

I agree with your reasoning. Just a doubt: why does Cambridge post on its website that they receive around 1,000 applications and make 350-400 offers? That would mean, factoring in some generosity, at least a 30% admission rate.
Do you think they purposefully underestimate the selectivity of the programme?

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Dutchman
No, the statement is correct. Note that most people also apply to other good universities such as Harvard, Yale, Oxford and therefore not all people accept their Cambridge offer. This year, around 200 people are taking the LLM here (highest number ever).

It's safe to say that LSE is much easier to get into. Oxford is considerably harder, and Cambridge is known to have the highest entry requirements in the UK.
(Note that I'm just talking about entry requirements, not necessarily the quality of the programme/rankings).
No, the statement is correct. Note that most people also apply to other good universities such as Harvard, Yale, Oxford and therefore not all people accept their Cambridge offer. This year, around 200 people are taking the LLM here (highest number ever).

It's safe to say that LSE is much easier to get into. Oxford is considerably harder, and Cambridge is known to have the highest entry requirements in the UK.
(Note that I'm just talking about entry requirements, not necessarily the quality of the programme/rankings).
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