Columbia vs. LSE


argo
I know it´s difficult to compare these schools, but i am seeking advice on which one to choose. Both programes are great and so are the cities, so i guess it all comes down to where i am most likely to secure a job after graduation. Any thoughts? I am from Argentina but have EU citizenship.
I know it´s difficult to compare these schools, but i am seeking advice on which one to choose. Both programes are great and so are the cities, so i guess it all comes down to where i am most likely to secure a job after graduation. Any thoughts? I am from Argentina but have EU citizenship.
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Legal_Don
LLM at Columbia Law School is far better than the one at LSE. You will take more courses and will also have more networking opportunities.

LD
LLM at Columbia Law School is far better than the one at LSE. You will take more courses and will also have more networking opportunities.

LD
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JayK
LLM at Columbia Law School is far better than the one at LSE. You will take more courses and will also have more networking opportunities.

LD


It's a joke ?

More courses ? To be honest, I compared a lot of LLM and LSE is by far the university in the world offering the course selection the most varied and more interesting.

Moreover, with the development of the European Union, I think a UK LLM will be increasingly useful, especially when you want to specialize in banking/finance or corporate/commercial law.
<blockquote>LLM at Columbia Law School is far better than the one at LSE. You will take more courses and will also have more networking opportunities.

LD</blockquote>

It's a joke ?

More courses ? To be honest, I compared a lot of LLM and LSE is by far the university in the world offering the course selection the most varied and more interesting.

Moreover, with the development of the European Union, I think a UK LLM will be increasingly useful, especially when you want to specialize in banking/finance or corporate/commercial law.
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Kimi1981
LSE is a very good and respected school (I've been there for a summer program), but Columbia is on a completely different level.
Only Oxbridge can compete against top 4 U.S. law school (YLS, CLS, SLS & HLS).
Also bear in mind that UK university do not organize job fair for LL.M. students as U.S. law schools do, which eases your job hunting after the LL.M.
LSE is a very good and respected school (I've been there for a summer program), but Columbia is on a completely different level.
Only Oxbridge can compete against top 4 U.S. law school (YLS, CLS, SLS & HLS).
Also bear in mind that UK university do not organize job fair for LL.M. students as U.S. law schools do, which eases your job hunting after the LL.M.
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Legal_Don
I have completed my LLM from one of the top 5 US Law Schools. There is no doubt that LSE is one of the best institutions, but as far as LLM Program is concerned, Columbia's LLM is better. You take 24 credit hours in LLM at Columbia, which means 8 courses of 3 credit hours. In LSE, only 4 courses can be taken in the entire LLM Porgram. If you see the LLM Course Catalogue at Columbia, it offers a lot of courses in each semester.

There are more job prospects after LLM at Columbia, because of Job fairs, career planning seminars etc.

Kind regards,

LD

I have completed my LLM from one of the top 5 US Law Schools. There is no doubt that LSE is one of the best institutions, but as far as LLM Program is concerned, Columbia's LLM is better. You take 24 credit hours in LLM at Columbia, which means 8 courses of 3 credit hours. In LSE, only 4 courses can be taken in the entire LLM Porgram. If you see the LLM Course Catalogue at Columbia, it offers a lot of courses in each semester.

There are more job prospects after LLM at Columbia, because of Job fairs, career planning seminars etc.

Kind regards,

LD
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JayK
Your two points of view are very interesting but I am still not convicted.

Firstly, on the offer letter I have received, it is stated that there are at least 21 hours of courses per week, making its LLM the most complete that I have seen.

Regarding courses, I wait that someone proves me another LLM in the world offers a better choice in Law, economics and political science. Indeed, I think it is also a great asset for LSE to be as famous in Law as Economics and Political Science.

By way of comparison, a friend, now at Cornell, tells me that there are no more of 5 hours of courses per week. Sorry to be skeptical about the reputation of the Ivy League

Secondly, some alumni, now in firms such as Freshfields, Lovells, Baker & McKenzie (), told me there is equivalent to job fairs in UK and that they had been directly hired for the occasion, especially after an LLM in LSE.

Kings Regards,

JayK
Your two points of view are very interesting but I am still not convicted.

Firstly, on the offer letter I have received, it is stated that there are at least 21 hours of courses per week, making its LLM the most complete that I have seen.

Regarding courses, I wait that someone proves me another LLM in the world offers a better choice in Law, economics and political science. Indeed, I think it is also a great asset for LSE to be as famous in Law as Economics and Political Science.

By way of comparison, a friend, now at Cornell, tells me that there are no more of 5 hours of courses per week. Sorry to be skeptical about the reputation of the Ivy League…

Secondly, some alumni, now in firms such as Freshfields, Lovells, Baker & McKenzie (…), told me there is equivalent to job fairs in UK and that they had been directly hired for the occasion, especially after an LLM in LSE.

Kings Regards,

JayK
quote
Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.
Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.
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JayK
Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.


It's curious that everybody who went to LSE around me told me the exact opposite of you ...
<blockquote>Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.</blockquote>

It's curious that everybody who went to LSE around me told me the exact opposite of you ...
quote
Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.


It's curious that everybody who went to LSE around me told me the exact opposite of you ...


Logically, this will be the case, students will support their own colleges.
<blockquote><blockquote>Where you plan to work will have the biggest bearing on which LLM to go for, and also what you want to specialise in.

The LLM from LSE seems to have a strangely brilliant reputation in the US, that exceeds UCL and KCL - despite the fact they all roughly teach the same courses (all three are great colleges for LLMs).

A Columbia LLM would look impressive if you plan to work in London. While LLM LSE is just another LLM from the Uni of London (employers won't discriminate between LSE, UCL and KCL). But in the US, a LLM from LSE will look good (because it has a good and baffling reputation in the US).

Hands down, Columbia has a much better faculty than LSE.

I was taught at LSE and found the teaching standards below par for the courses I took. Since the college left the intercollegiate program (so they could hike up their fees) the number of courses available have also considerably dropped. If you actually want to study in London go for KCL or UCL, and get at least the same, if not better, education, and keep some money in your pocket.</blockquote>

It's curious that everybody who went to LSE around me told me the exact opposite of you ...</blockquote>

Logically, this will be the case, students will support their own colleges.
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argo
Thank you all very much for your comments. I will certainly take them into account in making my decission.
Best,
Argo
Thank you all very much for your comments. I will certainly take them into account in making my decission.
Best,
Argo
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rafadavi
I think I can give you some inside, the course at LSE is twice than CLs in size... to start this for is not good at all.

I have 3 close friends who graduated last year in LSE and 4 friends this year in CLS.

They are all good strong candidetes from Latin America (Colombia,Venezuela and Mexico).

Those who went to CLS all got jobs offers three in the US and one in Dubai!!! (lots of money)

Those who went to LSE are struggling to find a job, and to the date just one found job in London as an ADR assistant...

So for me COLUMBIA wins LSE by far... just like Liverpool does to Arsenal jejeje
I think I can give you some inside, the course at LSE is twice than CLs in size... to start this for is not good at all.

I have 3 close friends who graduated last year in LSE and 4 friends this year in CLS.

They are all good strong candidetes from Latin America (Colombia,Venezuela and Mexico).

Those who went to CLS all got jobs offers three in the US and one in Dubai!!! (lots of money)

Those who went to LSE are struggling to find a job, and to the date just one found job in London as an ADR assistant...

So for me COLUMBIA wins LSE by far... just like Liverpool does to Arsenal jejeje
quote
JayK
I think I can give you some inside, the course at LSE is twice than CLs in size... to start this for is not good at all.

I have 3 close friends who graduated last year in LSE and 4 friends this year in CLS.

They are all good strong candidetes from Latin America (Colombia,Venezuela and Mexico).

Those who went to CLS all got jobs offers three in the US and one in Dubai!!! (lots of money)

Those who went to LSE are struggling to find a job, and to the date just one found job in London as an ADR assistant...

So for me COLUMBIA wins LSE by far... just like Liverpool does to Arsenal jejeje


I am sorry but how is it possible that there are more than 21 hours per week at Columbia? If it's like to Cornell with 5 hours, scuse me to be very skeptical ... Do you have any proof of what you say ?

In addition, I am also very sceptical about the fact that it is easy to find a job after an LLM in the USA. All french students around me returned to France after their LLM, and of course without finding a job there ...
<blockquote>I think I can give you some inside, the course at LSE is twice than CLs in size... to start this for is not good at all.

I have 3 close friends who graduated last year in LSE and 4 friends this year in CLS.

They are all good strong candidetes from Latin America (Colombia,Venezuela and Mexico).

Those who went to CLS all got jobs offers three in the US and one in Dubai!!! (lots of money)

Those who went to LSE are struggling to find a job, and to the date just one found job in London as an ADR assistant...

So for me COLUMBIA wins LSE by far... just like Liverpool does to Arsenal jejeje</blockquote>

I am sorry but how is it possible that there are more than 21 hours per week at Columbia? If it's like to Cornell with 5 hours, scuse me to be very skeptical ... Do you have any proof of what you say ?

In addition, I am also very sceptical about the fact that it is easy to find a job after an LLM in the USA. All french students around me returned to France after their LLM, and of course without finding a job there ...
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usone
Both are great!
Both are great!
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Timbaland
I'm from England, studied at Oxford and got LL.M. from Columbia, from my personal experience I can say that in the UK only Oxford and Cambridge can rival the top 4 U.S. law schools (Yale, Col, Har and Stan).
UCL, QMUL and LSE are good schools that can help you land great jobs at top UK firms (such as A&O, Slaughters, CC, Links, etc.) but in terms of academic quality and worldwide reputation they are not comparable to CLS, HLS and YLS.
Having said that I think that you should base your decision also on other factors: 1) costs; 2) living in London or NYC; and 3) what you are going to do after the LL.M.
Cheers
I'm from England, studied at Oxford and got LL.M. from Columbia, from my personal experience I can say that in the UK only Oxford and Cambridge can rival the top 4 U.S. law schools (Yale, Col, Har and Stan).
UCL, QMUL and LSE are good schools that can help you land great jobs at top UK firms (such as A&O, Slaughters, CC, Links, etc.) but in terms of academic quality and worldwide reputation they are not comparable to CLS, HLS and YLS.
Having said that I think that you should base your decision also on other factors: 1) costs; 2) living in London or NYC; and 3) what you are going to do after the LL.M.
Cheers
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JayK
I'm from England, studied at Oxford and got LL.M. from Columbia, from my personal experience I can say that in the UK only Oxford and Cambridge can rival the top 4 U.S. law schools (Yale, Col, Har and Stan).
UCL, QMUL and LSE are good schools that can help you land great jobs at top UK firms (such as A&O, Slaughters, CC, Links, etc.) but in terms of academic quality and worldwide reputation they are not comparable to CLS, HLS and YLS.
Having said that I think that you should base your decision also on other factors: 1) costs; 2) living in London or NYC; and 3) what you are going to do after the LL.M.
Cheers


Your point of view is interesting. However, I think that in some areas, it is preferable to work in London, especially in Business Law.

Furthermore, I think that the reputation of LSE is much higher than those of other universities in London (UCL, Kings) and easily rivals with Oxford and Cambridge.

Even in the academic field, law school rankings like the Times show that LSE is with Oxford and Cambridge far ahead of other universities in London. That's why I think LSE is a very great option.
<blockquote>I'm from England, studied at Oxford and got LL.M. from Columbia, from my personal experience I can say that in the UK only Oxford and Cambridge can rival the top 4 U.S. law schools (Yale, Col, Har and Stan).
UCL, QMUL and LSE are good schools that can help you land great jobs at top UK firms (such as A&O, Slaughters, CC, Links, etc.) but in terms of academic quality and worldwide reputation they are not comparable to CLS, HLS and YLS.
Having said that I think that you should base your decision also on other factors: 1) costs; 2) living in London or NYC; and 3) what you are going to do after the LL.M.
Cheers</blockquote>

Your point of view is interesting. However, I think that in some areas, it is preferable to work in London, especially in Business Law.

Furthermore, I think that the reputation of LSE is much higher than those of other universities in London (UCL, Kings) and easily rivals with Oxford and Cambridge.

Even in the academic field, law school rankings like the Times show that LSE is with Oxford and Cambridge far ahead of other universities in London. That's why I think LSE is a very great option.
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