Non-law graduate...need your expert advice


Hi All,

Is there anyone who knows whether a non-law graduate is eligible to take LL.M programs?If yes in which universities adn what programs?

Thanks All!

Regards,
Kelvin
Hi All,

Is there anyone who knows whether a non-law graduate is eligible to take LL.M programs?If yes in which universities adn what programs?

Thanks All!

Regards,
Kelvin
quote
gbe
This has been discussed before, eg
http://www.llm-guide.com/board/74480
http://www.llm-guide.com/boardsearch/q/%22non-law

This article may also be useful:
http://www.llm-guide.com/article/213/llm-programs-for-non-law-graduates
This has been discussed before, eg
http://www.llm-guide.com/board/74480
http://www.llm-guide.com/boardsearch/q/%22non-law

This article may also be useful:
http://www.llm-guide.com/article/213/llm-programs-for-non-law-graduates
quote
Nearly 50% of the students in our program are not law graduates.

But our program is not a general law program if that is what you're looking for. Rather it only specializes in areas such as international tax, financial services, wealth management and anti money-laundering. Thus, as you might suspect, those 50% non-lawyers work for banks and investment firms. You can contact me if you are interested - or google me to read about the program - Prof. William H. Byrnes

Another LLM program that admits about half non-lawyers that may interest you is at St. Thomas in Miami. That program is in intercultural human rights.
Nearly 50% of the students in our program are not law graduates.

But our program is not a general law program if that is what you're looking for. Rather it only specializes in areas such as international tax, financial services, wealth management and anti money-laundering. Thus, as you might suspect, those 50% non-lawyers work for banks and investment firms. You can contact me if you are interested - or google me to read about the program - Prof. William H. Byrnes

Another LLM program that admits about half non-lawyers that may interest you is at St. Thomas in Miami. That program is in intercultural human rights.
quote
daneko
Nearly 50% of the students in our program are not law graduates.

But our program is not a general law program if that is what you're looking for. Rather it only specializes in areas such as international tax, financial services, wealth management and anti money-laundering. Thus, as you might suspect, those 50% non-lawyers work for banks and investment firms. You can contact me if you are interested - or google me to read about the program - Prof. William H. Byrnes

Another LLM program that admits about half non-lawyers that may interest you is at St. Thomas in Miami. That program is in intercultural human rights.


would like to contact you.
<blockquote>Nearly 50% of the students in our program are not law graduates.

But our program is not a general law program if that is what you're looking for. Rather it only specializes in areas such as international tax, financial services, wealth management and anti money-laundering. Thus, as you might suspect, those 50% non-lawyers work for banks and investment firms. You can contact me if you are interested - or google me to read about the program - Prof. William H. Byrnes

Another LLM program that admits about half non-lawyers that may interest you is at St. Thomas in Miami. That program is in intercultural human rights.</blockquote>

would like to contact you.
quote
Feel free to reach out. I have just returned to the USA after two months working with my non-US institutions on establishing our localized, foreign language US law degrees.

My blog is williambyrnes.wordpress.com and has my contact details under my biography
Feel free to reach out. I have just returned to the USA after two months working with my non-US institutions on establishing our localized, foreign language US law degrees.

My blog is williambyrnes.wordpress.com and has my contact details under my biography
quote
Comandante
and 100% of your graduates will end-up with useless and expensive "degrees".
and 100% of your graduates will end-up with useless and expensive "degrees".
quote
daneko
and 100% of your graduates will end-up with useless and expensive "degrees".



well partially true. The benefits of an LLM for non lawyers are not clear except for knowledge so the amount you pay for it is important if you are a non lawyer. As well, it should be in a very specialized area.

Unlike the MBA, the LLM is not alone going to help much and this applies to both non lawyers and lawyers.
<blockquote>and 100% of your graduates will end-up with useless and expensive "degrees".</blockquote>


well partially true. The benefits of an LLM for non lawyers are not clear except for knowledge so the amount you pay for it is important if you are a non lawyer. As well, it should be in a very specialized area.

Unlike the MBA, the LLM is not alone going to help much and this applies to both non lawyers and lawyers.
quote
Dank - I think that you are correct that such an LLM should be contextually specialised to the candidate's employment (or intended employment) to generally generate a return on the investment.

By example, a tax accountant may financially benefit from earning a jurisprudential based tax degree, and in the same vein a tax lawyer from a accounting based tax degree. A finance MBA may benefit from learning product structuring from the legal and tax aspects while a securities lawyer may benefit from finance courses.

I have several finance MBAs enrolled in our Treasury Risk Management (Futures & Options simualtion in gold denominated accounts) course and in the Debt Structuring & Taxation course this summer (see http://my.calendars.net/tjsl/d01/07/2010?display=M&style=B&positioning=A) - yet for many these courses would not contextually deliver value because these subjects exist in a niche of investment banking.
Dank - I think that you are correct that such an LLM should be contextually specialised to the candidate's employment (or intended employment) to generally generate a return on the investment.

By example, a tax accountant may financially benefit from earning a jurisprudential based tax degree, and in the same vein a tax lawyer from a accounting based tax degree. A finance MBA may benefit from learning product structuring from the legal and tax aspects while a securities lawyer may benefit from finance courses.

I have several finance MBAs enrolled in our Treasury Risk Management (Futures & Options simualtion in gold denominated accounts) course and in the Debt Structuring & Taxation course this summer (see http://my.calendars.net/tjsl/d01/07/2010?display=M&style=B&positioning=A) - yet for many these courses would not contextually deliver value because these subjects exist in a niche of investment banking.
quote
daneko
ya so basically it has to build upon a person's experience and unlike the MBA, it is not a career-changing degree and cannot be used stand-alone. So for non lawyers, they really need to look at the value and whether it fits in with their goals.
ya so basically it has to build upon a person's experience and unlike the MBA, it is not a career-changing degree and cannot be used stand-alone. So for non lawyers, they really need to look at the value and whether it fits in with their goals.
quote
Yes I would agree with you - it must be considered in the context of your university degree, work experience if any, and of course what you want to do in the future.

Compliance and tax - it works stand alone. Wealth management - in between. Investment banking - can't be stand alone.
Yes I would agree with you - it must be considered in the context of your university degree, work experience if any, and of course what you want to do in the future.

Compliance and tax - it works stand alone. Wealth management - in between. Investment banking - can't be stand alone.
quote
daneko
excellent post in terms of what does not work stand alone. That is important for those who do not have a law degree.
excellent post in terms of what does not work stand alone. That is important for those who do not have a law degree.
quote
My experience is that it is true for most, if not all degrees - at the Masters level.

University degrees I have not found have any stand alone relevancy for obtaining students' career outcomes. I haven't undertaken much research to understand the specific turning point, but my best guess is that either (1) certain positions became more complex, or (2) from a "job slot" approach, so many applicants have university degrees and now MBAs, that employers look for another criterion by which to create an efficient short list for interviews.
My experience is that it is true for most, if not all degrees - at the Masters level.

University degrees I have not found have any stand alone relevancy for obtaining students' career outcomes. I haven't undertaken much research to understand the specific turning point, but my best guess is that either (1) certain positions became more complex, or (2) from a "job slot" approach, so many applicants have university degrees and now MBAs, that employers look for another criterion by which to create an efficient short list for interviews.
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