civil law qualification + UK LL.M for In-house Counsel worth it?


Hi everybody,

I am a Spanish qualified lawyer working as in-house counsel for a multinational Insurer and would like to get your opinion/advise about pursuing an LL.M at a prestigious UK based University.

Do you believe an LL.M in Insurance/Finance/Banking will affect an In-House career positively? If yes, only UK or worldwide?

The prestige factor is important?

Hi everybody,

I am a Spanish qualified lawyer working as in-house counsel for a multinational Insurer and would like to get your opinion/advise about pursuing an LL.M at a prestigious UK based University.

Do you believe an LL.M in Insurance/Finance/Banking will affect an In-House career positively? If yes, only UK or worldwide?

The prestige factor is important?
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chicken so...

Yes, prestige is typically important. What are your goals? 

Yes, prestige is typically important. What are your goals? 
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Yes, prestige is typically important. What are your goals? 


Essentially career, but not in law firms. Thought to use the experience, knowledge and prestige of an LL.M at QMU or King’s or UoL in case I would apply for a UK based job.

even other Multinationals in EEA countries hire counsels with LL.Ms in US or UK, and candidates do not have a background of common law.


[quote]Yes, prestige is typically important. What are your goals?&nbsp; [/quote]<br><br>Essentially career, but not in law firms. Thought&nbsp;to use the experience, knowledge and prestige of an LL.M at QMU or King’s or UoL in case I would apply for a UK based job.<br><br>even other Multinationals in EEA countries hire counsels with LL.Ms in US or UK, and candidates do not have a background of common law.<br><br><br>
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chicken so...

Is this a common destination for graduates from these programs? Will / do firms hire in-house people who don't have the right to practice in the country? You might want to search through LinkedIn to see if there are many who make this kind of transition. 

Typically an LLM isn't commonly used to transition between countries. Graduates are much more likely to return to their previous law firm or another firm in their country after the degree. 

Is this a common destination for graduates from these programs? Will / do firms hire in-house people who don't have the right to practice in the country? You might want to search through LinkedIn to see if there are many who make this kind of transition.&nbsp;<br><br>Typically an LLM isn't commonly used to transition between countries. Graduates are much more likely to return to their previous law firm or another firm in their country after the degree.&nbsp;
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