Best law schools 2010


cmars

Most queries on the boards are about whether university X is better than university Y - not surprising as you're investing a year of your lives. Before I tell you (!), you should note that the top 10 law schools in any country are self-evident (and rankings make their reputations self-reinforcing), but the difference between 11 and 30 is very often microscopic, and the rankings are aggregated. So you will need to do your homework and find out the specific professors teaching on the LLM you intend to apply for.
Bearing that aggregated rankings are something of a joke as far as schools are concerned, you should read this expert blog posting about the US: http://madisonian.net/2010/03/04/thoughts-about-choosing-a-law-school/ and this ranking guide for the UK: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/table/2008/dec/18/rae-results-2008-law-degree (see how many are 2.2-2.7)
Good luck but don't forget to investigate your specific courses and profs - no good having a good overall ranking but with no international trade lawyers of note (or vice versa, perhaps...)

Most queries on the boards are about whether university X is better than university Y - not surprising as you're investing a year of your lives. Before I tell you (!), you should note that the top 10 law schools in any country are self-evident (and rankings make their reputations self-reinforcing), but the difference between 11 and 30 is very often microscopic, and the rankings are aggregated. So you will need to do your homework and find out the specific professors teaching on the LLM you intend to apply for.
Bearing that aggregated rankings are something of a joke as far as schools are concerned, you should read this expert blog posting about the US: http://madisonian.net/2010/03/04/thoughts-about-choosing-a-law-school/ and this ranking guide for the UK: http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/table/2008/dec/18/rae-results-2008-law-degree (see how many are 2.2-2.7)
Good luck but don't forget to investigate your specific courses and profs - no good having a good overall ranking but with no international trade lawyers of note (or vice versa, perhaps...)
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PUCCA

that was a very good advice! thats what i tried to do before choosing my university,,,good luck :)

that was a very good advice! thats what i tried to do before choosing my university,,,good luck :)
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cmars

Here's some more good advice about the perils of having too many part-time faculty: http://madisonian.net/2010/03/19/choosing-a-law-school-part-5/

Here's some more good advice about the perils of having too many part-time faculty: http://madisonian.net/2010/03/19/choosing-a-law-school-part-5/
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LLMblogger

The link you refer to with regard to the UK is not a proper ranking - it is a Research Assessment Exercise from 2008.

I would say that the following rankings are more informative for UK law schools:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/table/2009/may/12/university-guide-law

http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_gug/gooduniversityguide.php?AC_sub=Law&x=13&y=14&sub=38

The link you refer to with regard to the UK is not a proper ranking - it is a Research Assessment Exercise from 2008.

I would say that the following rankings are more informative for UK law schools:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/table/2009/may/12/university-guide-law

http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_gug/gooduniversityguide.php?AC_sub=Law&x=13&y=14&sub=38
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cmars

I'm sorry that LLMblogger does not know much about UK law schools - every 7 years or so we are judged for our research in a peer-reviewed exercise which determines who gets research money - its hugely important and the only reliable guide to peer-reviewed research (whatever its faults). The next one is in 2013. There is no substitute for that in ranking law schools on their research profile, for better or worse.
See http://www.rae.ac.uk/

I'm sorry that LLMblogger does not know much about UK law schools - every 7 years or so we are judged for our research in a peer-reviewed exercise which determines who gets research money - its hugely important and the only reliable guide to peer-reviewed research (whatever its faults). The next one is in 2013. There is no substitute for that in ranking law schools on their research profile, for better or worse.
See http://www.rae.ac.uk/
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LLMblogger

Cmars, please don't forget that most of us are applying for taught programmes, not research programmes. Hence, a general ranking of a law school, which usually also includes the quality of its research, is more helpful in choosing LLM programmes. If you need a ranking to justify the offers you receive or don't receive, the RAE may be helpful to you. I choose to believe that Oxford and Cambridge are better than e.g. UCL and LSE, even though they are good schools and no doubt have excellent research facilities.

Cmars, please don't forget that most of us are applying for taught programmes, not research programmes. Hence, a general ranking of a law school, which usually also includes the quality of its research, is more helpful in choosing LLM programmes. If you need a ranking to justify the offers you receive or don't receive, the RAE may be helpful to you. I choose to believe that Oxford and Cambridge are better than e.g. UCL and LSE, even though they are good schools and no doubt have excellent research facilities.
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cmars

For UK schools, note that the LLM-teaching is research-led - unlike in some US schools where the LLM is an adjunct to the JD, in the UK LLM students are entirely separate from the undergrads (and if you are not, you have every right to complain).
Therefore peer-reviewed RAE stats are extremely relevant - its what law schools look at to judge themselves, not annual rankings - which in any case have multiplied so much that there are now at least 5 sets per year (preposterous, and particularly subjective rankings).
For what its worth, the research culture at LSE (and I've never been an academic there nor do I intend to, I'm not a workaholic) is streets ahead of Oxford or Cambridge - but they are more traditional and many employers still value the Oxbridge cachet, especially for undergrads.

For UK schools, note that the LLM-teaching is research-led - unlike in some US schools where the LLM is an adjunct to the JD, in the UK LLM students are entirely separate from the undergrads (and if you are not, you have every right to complain).
Therefore peer-reviewed RAE stats are extremely relevant - its what law schools look at to judge themselves, not annual rankings - which in any case have multiplied so much that there are now at least 5 sets per year (preposterous, and particularly subjective rankings).
For what its worth, the research culture at LSE (and I've never been an academic there nor do I intend to, I'm not a workaholic) is streets ahead of Oxford or Cambridge - but they are more traditional and many employers still value the Oxbridge cachet, especially for undergrads.
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LLMblogger

I agree that the RAE is important, but had an issue with it being presented on this board as some kind of a superior league table. It is one aspect that people may wish to consider when choosing an LLM, so thanks for clearing that up.
Good luck in your applications.

I agree that the RAE is important, but had an issue with it being presented on this board as some kind of a superior league table. It is one aspect that people may wish to consider when choosing an LLM, so thanks for clearing that up.
Good luck in your applications.
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Oldtimer

I know it is not exactly what you are discussing here, but the Economist just published an article on University rankings which I found very interesting and relevant. I began a separate thread to discuss it in case anybody is interested:

http://llm-guide.com/board/86044

I know it is not exactly what you are discussing here, but the Economist just published an article on University rankings which I found very interesting and relevant. I began a separate thread to discuss it in case anybody is interested:

http://llm-guide.com/board/86044
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abhi43

Hi i got admitted to Fall LL.M 2010 Program in Northwestern School...May I know how is International law program and LLM/K program ? Please help me .........

that was a very good advice! thats what i tried to do before choosing my university,,,good luck :)

Hi i got admitted to Fall LL.M 2010 Program in Northwestern School...May I know how is International law program and LLM/K program ? Please help me .........

<blockquote>that was a very good advice! thats what i tried to do before choosing my university,,,good luck :)</blockquote>
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cmars

For those still looking for advice on rankings etc., re-reading this thread should help you realize that you're asking the wrong question...

For those still looking for advice on rankings etc., re-reading this thread should help you realize that you're asking the wrong question...
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