Accelerated JD or LLM ?


Celcel9

Hi ! This question has already been asked but I’m really confused and need help on this. I’m a Law student in France, having just finished my Masters there. I do not have any professional experience yet.





Being a dual national, I have also US citizenship. I’m thinking of applying to an LLM program in the US and passing the bar there, but I’m very confused as to whether I should go for an LLM program or an accelerated JD program for foreign educated law students.





Im hoping to find a job in the US after graduating but I’m not sure whether I want to settle there permanently or not.





Im applying to well ranked law schools for the LLM programs (1 to 40 rank on US news), but the law schools offering accelerated Jd programs for foreign law students are generally not very well ranked (from 50 to 100 rank on US News), in addition to being located in cities that are not very international.





So my question is : Is getting a JD from a lower ranked law school better for future employment than getting an LLM from a better ranked school (given that I also do not have any professional experience yet) ? Are job prospects really a lot more limited as an LLM student even after taking the bar ? And would having US citizenship help my case in any way in finding a job after graduation ?





Any answers would really help, thank you !

[Edited by Celcel9 on Aug 26, 2020]

Hi ! This question has already been asked but I’m really confused and need help on this. I’m a Law student in France, having just finished my Masters there. I do not have any professional experience yet. <br><br>
<br><br>
Being a dual national, I have also US citizenship. I’m thinking of applying to an LLM program in the US and passing the bar there, but I’m very confused as to whether I should go for an LLM program or an accelerated JD program for foreign educated law students.<br><br>
<br><br>
Im hoping to find a job in the US after graduating but I’m not sure whether I want to settle there permanently or not. <br><br>
<br><br>
Im applying to well ranked law schools for the LLM programs (1 to 40 rank on US news), but the law schools offering accelerated Jd programs for foreign law students are generally not very well ranked (from 50 to 100 rank on US News), in addition to being located in cities that are not very international. <br><br>
<br><br>
So my question is : Is getting a JD from a lower ranked law school better for future employment than getting an LLM from a better ranked school (given that I also do not have any professional experience yet) ? Are job prospects really a lot more limited as an LLM student even after taking the bar ? And would having US citizenship help my case in any way in finding a job after graduation ? <br><br>
<br><br>
Any answers would really help, thank you !
quote
oramos

I'm in a similar situation; I think I'll end up applying to Northwestern's Two-Year JD for International Lawyers, and also to some LLMs (Stanford, Columbia, Berkeley, NYU, UCLA, UT)

I'm in a similar situation; I think I'll end up applying to Northwestern's Two-Year JD for International Lawyers, and also to some LLMs (Stanford, Columbia, Berkeley, NYU, UCLA, UT)
quote
Mims

Hello, I am also in a very similar situation, though I did my primary law learning in the UK (an LLB). Even though I'm no expert, I don't think it's a bad idea to apply for some Two-Year JDs and some LLMs; you can pick more easily based on where you're accepted. 

If you are hoping to stay and work in the USA after studying there, I think it would probably be more beneficial for you to focus on securing a JD. Good luck :) 

Hello, I am also in a very similar situation, though I did my primary law learning in the UK&nbsp;(an LLB). Even though I'm no expert, I don't think it's a bad idea to apply for some Two-Year JDs and some LLMs; you can pick more easily based on where you're accepted.&nbsp;<br><br>If you are hoping to stay and work in the USA after studying there, I think it would probably be more beneficial for you to focus on securing a JD. Good luck :)&nbsp;
quote

I am also thinking that.
First option is getting llm but people says there is limited job in this case for foreign lawyer.
Maybe 2 years jd will give better option for getting job

I am also thinking that.<br>First option is getting llm but people says there is limited job in this case for foreign lawyer.<br>Maybe 2 years jd will give better option for getting job
quote
jwpetterch...

If you know you’re going to stay here and maybe end up practicing law in a state like Florida where only JDs can join the bar, do the JD. If you’re just going to stay in New York or California or just go back, do the LLM. Either way, you will have opportunities open up here, you just have to find them and know that some will be more open to you than others based on your qualifications. There are no easy answers here.


Hi ! This question has already been asked but I’m really confused and need help on this. I’m a Law student in France, having just finished my Masters there. I do not have any professional experience yet.





Being a dual national, I have also US citizenship. I’m thinking of applying to an LLM program in the US and passing the bar there, but I’m very confused as to whether I should go for an LLM program or an accelerated JD program for foreign educated law students.





Im hoping to find a job in the US after graduating but I’m not sure whether I want to settle there permanently or not.





Im applying to well ranked law schools for the LLM programs (1 to 40 rank on US news), but the law schools offering accelerated Jd programs for foreign law students are generally not very well ranked (from 50 to 100 rank on US News), in addition to being located in cities that are not very international.





So my question is : Is getting a JD from a lower ranked law school better for future employment than getting an LLM from a better ranked school (given that I also do not have any professional experience yet) ? Are job prospects really a lot more limited as an LLM student even after taking the bar ? And would having US citizenship help my case in any way in finding a job after graduation ?





Any answers would really help, thank you !

If you know you’re going to stay here and maybe end up practicing law in a state like Florida where only JDs can join the bar, do the JD. If you’re just going to stay in New York or California or just go back, do the LLM. Either way, you will have opportunities open up here, you just have to find them and know that some will be more open to you than others based on your qualifications. There are no easy answers here.<br><br><br>[quote]Hi ! This question has already been asked but I’m really confused and need help on this. I’m a Law student in France, having just finished my Masters there. I do not have any professional experience yet. <br><br>
<br><br>
Being a dual national, I have also US citizenship. I’m thinking of applying to an LLM program in the US and passing the bar there, but I’m very confused as to whether I should go for an LLM program or an accelerated JD program for foreign educated law students.<br><br>
<br><br>
Im hoping to find a job in the US after graduating but I’m not sure whether I want to settle there permanently or not. <br><br>
<br><br>
Im applying to well ranked law schools for the LLM programs (1 to 40 rank on US news), but the law schools offering accelerated Jd programs for foreign law students are generally not very well ranked (from 50 to 100 rank on US News), in addition to being located in cities that are not very international. <br><br>
<br><br>
So my question is : Is getting a JD from a lower ranked law school better for future employment than getting an LLM from a better ranked school (given that I also do not have any professional experience yet) ? Are job prospects really a lot more limited as an LLM student even after taking the bar ? And would having US citizenship help my case in any way in finding a job after graduation ? <br><br>
<br><br>
Any answers would really help, thank you ! [/quote]
quote
Pips

Check the accelerated JD program offered by Arizona State University. I'm in the same situation as yours (studying a Master 2 currently) and I think that investing in a 2 years JD is better than the LLM, especially that you have no past work experience.

[Edited by Pips on Sep 17, 2020]

Check the accelerated JD program offered by Arizona State University. I'm in the same situation as yours (studying a Master 2 currently) and I think that investing in a 2 years JD is better than the LLM, especially that you have no past work experience.
quote

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