LLM in France


mouzi99

Hello :)

I recently graduated from a UK university with an LLB Bachelor of Laws and am interested in applying for the LLM Business Law for foreign lawyers at Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne. From my understanding, in France, an LLM does not constitute a Masters 1 or 2, however, I was wondering if anyone knows whether it is equivalent to an LLM in the UK?

Thanks in advance

Hello :)

I recently graduated from a UK university with an LLB Bachelor of Laws and am interested in applying for the LLM Business Law for foreign lawyers at Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne. From my understanding, in France, an LLM does not constitute a Masters 1 or 2, however, I was wondering if anyone knows whether it is equivalent to an LLM in the UK?

Thanks in advance
quote

Hello :)



I recently graduated from a UK university with an LLB Bachelor of Laws and am interested in applying for the LLM Business Law for foreign lawyers at Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne. From my understanding, in France, an LLM does not constitute a Masters 1 or 2, however, I was wondering if anyone knows whether it is equivalent to an LLM in the UK?



Thanks in advance


Dear mouzzi99,
please take your time to read: https://www.universite-paris-saclay.fr/en/study/french-higher-education-system in the first instance.
Then, you mentioned that an LL.M. does not equal a Master 1 / Master 2 under the French system. However, this is exactly the case.
In Europe, very few systems can actually confer a LL.M. (Master of Laws; Magister Legum or MJur, etc...). France does not offer/confer any "LL.M." degrees (and does not in any form whatsoever, such as the titles/degrees mentioned above).
In terms of pure law-school "graduate" degrees, you have the Master 1 (formerly called maîtrise) and Master 2.
People will argue that only both constitute a "Master's Degree", but that is nonsense. 
As their name suggest, the Master 2 follows the Master 1. In reality, the difference is that your Master 1 is still rather a general-oriented program, while the Master 2 is the "real" "graduate" degree (often more specialized and super selective).
More importantly, if you are referring to : https://www.pantheonsorbonne.fr/ufr/eds-departement-droit-iec/llm-du/sorbonne-llm-business-law-for-foreign-lawyers/ then please beware and read the fine print, quote "This diploma is a « Diplôme d’Université (DU) » according to French academic criteria. It benefits from a national recognition but does not constitute a Master 1 or Master 2.".
A DU is literally, a "certificate". They mention "national recognition", but using this term here is wrong. These "diplomas" are simply certificates and are not regarded in the same way as a "real" degree. Often, these DU are undertaken by students while they undergo their regular L-M-D track (see first link). 
I'm actually shocked that they call it an LL.M. and only give you the lowest-class "paper" you can obtain in the country. It's really a shame. Please note that I always recommend, if you really want to study in France, to triple-check when a university claims it is offering an LL.M. : there is no LL.M. in France! They can however, call it like that an confer you the degree of Master 1 AND/OR Master 2 (usually only one of the two). It is therefore of the highest importance, that you e-mail any university that does not explicitly discloses what type of recognized diploma you will be getting at the end of your studies.
Again, for the so called "SORBONNE LL.M. BUSINESS LAW FOR FOREIGN LAWYERS", it is neither a Master 1 or Master 2, which therefore, in my opinion, is absolutely not and under no circumstances whatsoever, worth doing. At that price (6.000€), it is absolutely outrageous that you are merely getting a certificate (diplôme universitaire). I know the name is confusing, but it is really not a diploma per se.
Disclaimer: by the time someone reads this, this information might be incorrect. Therefore, make sure to do your own due-diligence and double-check the facts.
Best,
UnleashedSoul

[Edited by UnleashedSoul on Mar 11, 2021]

[quote]Hello :)<br>
<br>
I recently graduated from a UK university with an LLB Bachelor of Laws and am interested in applying for the LLM Business Law for foreign lawyers at Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne. From my understanding, in France, an LLM does not constitute a Masters 1 or 2, however, I was wondering if anyone knows whether it is equivalent to an LLM in the UK?<br>
<br>
Thanks in advance [/quote]<br><br>Dear mouzzi99,<div><br></div><div>please take your time to read: https://www.universite-paris-saclay.fr/en/study/french-higher-education-system in the first instance.</div><div><br></div><div>Then, you mentioned that an LL.M. does not equal a Master 1 / Master 2 under the French system. However, this is exactly the case.</div><div><br></div><div>In Europe, very few systems can actually confer a LL.M. (Master of Laws; Magister Legum or MJur, etc...). France does not offer/confer any "LL.M." degrees (and does not in any form whatsoever, such as the titles/degrees mentioned above).</div><div><br></div><div>In terms of pure law-school "graduate" degrees, you have the Master 1 (formerly called maîtrise) and Master 2.</div><div><br></div><div>People will argue that only both constitute a "Master's Degree", but that is nonsense.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>As their name suggest, the Master 2 follows the Master 1. In reality, the difference is that your Master 1 is still rather a general-oriented program, while the Master 2 is the "real" "graduate" degree (often more specialized and super selective).</div><div><br></div><div>More importantly, if you are referring to : https://www.pantheonsorbonne.fr/ufr/eds-departement-droit-iec/llm-du/sorbonne-llm-business-law-for-foreign-lawyers/ then please beware and read the fine print, quote "This diploma is a « Diplôme d’Université (DU) » according to French academic criteria. It benefits from a national recognition but does not constitute a Master 1 or Master 2.".</div><div><br></div><div>A DU is literally, a "certificate". They mention "national recognition", but using this term here is wrong. These "diplomas" are simply certificates and are not regarded in the same way as a "real" degree. Often, these DU are undertaken by students while they undergo their regular L-M-D track (see first link).&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>I'm actually shocked that they call it an LL.M. and only give you the lowest-class "paper" you can obtain in the country. It's really a shame. Please note that I always recommend, if you really want to study in France, to triple-check when a university claims it is offering an LL.M. : there is no LL.M. in France! They can however, call it like that an confer you the degree of Master 1 AND/OR Master 2 (usually only one of the two). It is therefore of the highest importance, that you e-mail any university that does not explicitly discloses what type of recognized diploma you will be getting at the end of your studies.</div><div><br></div><div>Again, for the so called "SORBONNE LL.M. BUSINESS LAW FOR FOREIGN LAWYERS", it is neither a Master 1 or Master 2, which therefore, in my opinion, is absolutely not and under no circumstances whatsoever, worth doing. At that price (6.000€), it is absolutely outrageous that you are merely getting a certificate (diplôme universitaire). I know the name is confusing, but it is really not a diploma per se.</div><div><br></div><div>Disclaimer: by the time someone reads this, this information might be incorrect. Therefore, make sure to do your own due-diligence and double-check the facts.</div><div><br></div><div>Best,</div><div><br></div><div>UnleashedSoul</div>
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