from LLM to PhD


Elaine
hello, guys! I am studying in LLM programme in Netherlands now and will graduate this summer. Now, I am planning to apply for PhD in UK, but whether they will accept my degree got from Netherlands, or do I need to study anew from master in UK?
hello, guys! I am studying in LLM programme in Netherlands now and will graduate this summer. Now, I am planning to apply for PhD in UK, but whether they will accept my degree got from Netherlands, or do I need to study anew from master in UK?
quote
Star
Hi there,
I am planning to do my LLM in the Netherlands this year. I don't think the British universities won't accpet the Dutch degrees. That won't a problem, no worries. Bonne chance!
Hi there,
I am planning to do my LLM in the Netherlands this year. I don't think the British universities won't accpet the Dutch degrees. That won't a problem, no worries. Bonne chance!
quote
Julius
Hi Elaine,
I think Star is right, considering EU Law you should be able to a PhD anywhere inside the European Union.
Tot ziens!
Julius
Hi Elaine,
I think Star is right, considering EU Law you should be able to a PhD anywhere inside the European Union.
Tot ziens!
Julius
quote
Star
Julius, you really get around and help everybody here ;-) Vey glad to find your post after mine.
Julius, you really get around and help everybody here ;-) Vey glad to find your post after mine.
quote
Russ
Hello Elaine!
I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD. What is your first degree in law? This may be more important than whether you have an LLM. Anyway, I know from my studies that in Europe academic degrees are recognized in other European countries.
Hello Elaine!
I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD. What is your first degree in law? This may be more important than whether you have an LLM. Anyway, I know from my studies that in Europe academic degrees are recognized in other European countries.
quote
Russ
Hello Elaine!
I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD. What is your first degree in law? This may be more important than whether you have an LLM. Anyway, I know from my studies that in Europe academic degrees are recognized in other European countries.
Hello Elaine!
I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD. What is your first degree in law? This may be more important than whether you have an LLM. Anyway, I know from my studies that in Europe academic degrees are recognized in other European countries.
quote
Russ
I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD.

I am not too sure about that.

UCE Brimingham states on its website:

"Students wishing to register for PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) are normally expected to hold a Master's award in a relevant area. Applicants for MPhil (Master of Philosophy) will normally be required to have a first or second class honours degree. Those accepted for registration for MPhil may be allowed to apply for transfer to PhD registration at a latter date, subject to satisfactory research progress."

Wheras Hull Law School writes:

"For entry to an LLM by Research, MPhil or PhD programme, candidates would also be expected to have or be about to obtain a degree in law or an appropriate related discipline of first or second class standard or equivalent, or a relevant Masters degree, and be able to show suitable research potential."

So it seems to be different in each university. At some law schools you need to an MPhil in order to do a PhD.

Hope this helps...
<blockquote>I think that an LLM is usually not required to do a PhD.</blockquote>
I am not too sure about that.

UCE Brimingham states on its website:

"Students wishing to register for PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) are normally expected to hold a Master's award in a relevant area. Applicants for MPhil (Master of Philosophy) will normally be required to have a first or second class honours degree. Those accepted for registration for MPhil may be allowed to apply for transfer to PhD registration at a latter date, subject to satisfactory research progress."

Wheras Hull Law School writes:

"For entry to an LLM by Research, MPhil or PhD programme, candidates would also be expected to have or be about to obtain a degree in law or an appropriate related discipline of first or second class standard or equivalent, or a relevant Masters degree, and be able to show suitable research potential."

So it seems to be different in each university. At some law schools you need to an MPhil in order to do a PhD.

Hope this helps...
quote
For some programmes you need a Master for others you don not. I know this from the LSE, where students are accepted also with an undergraduate degree. I have copied the programme from the LSE website (http://econ.lse.ac.uk/study/programmes/mresphd/)

MRes/PhD

The PhD Programme in Economics aims at the highest international standard of research and professional competence. Graduates from our PhD Programme in Economics have successfully gained employment in all areas requiring economists. The Economic Department places great emphasis on the PhD Programme; the intellectual climate created by a substantial number of able and enthusiastic students, along with the input of an encouraging and skilled staff are the most important assets of the Programme.

Post-graduate work at the LSE has traditionally consisted of a one year MSc programme followed by a separate MPhil/PhD programme. Starting with the 2003-04 academic year, the Economics Department have launched a new PhD programme, which is offered in twin-track format:

Track 1 of the new MRes/PhD programme admits students directly after completing their undergraduate degree.
Track 2 admits students after completing a rigorous MSc programme with courses equivalent to the first year of Track 1.

Admission will be highly competitive. We plan to enrol about 25 students in each year of the PhD.

The new (Track 1) PhD programme will require two years of course work, leading to an intermediate (MRes) qualification. The first year will be devoted to a rigorous study of the fundamentals in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. During the second year, students will take courses in two fields of their choice and start their own research by preparing a research paper. The following years will be devoted to full time research and completion of a dissertation. This structure is similar to that offered by most economics departments in the United States.

For students who have completed an MSc programme upon entrance, the new (Track 2) PhD programme (2004/5) requires only one year of course work, as these students enter directly in year two of the MRes/PhD programme.
For some programmes you need a Master for others you don not. I know this from the LSE, where students are accepted also with an undergraduate degree. I have copied the programme from the LSE website (http://econ.lse.ac.uk/study/programmes/mresphd/)

MRes/PhD

The PhD Programme in Economics aims at the highest international standard of research and professional competence. Graduates from our PhD Programme in Economics have successfully gained employment in all areas requiring economists. The Economic Department places great emphasis on the PhD Programme; the intellectual climate created by a substantial number of able and enthusiastic students, along with the input of an encouraging and skilled staff are the most important assets of the Programme.

Post-graduate work at the LSE has traditionally consisted of a one year MSc programme followed by a separate MPhil/PhD programme. Starting with the 2003-04 academic year, the Economics Department have launched a new PhD programme, which is offered in twin-track format:

Track 1 of the new MRes/PhD programme admits students directly after completing their undergraduate degree.
Track 2 admits students after completing a rigorous MSc programme with courses equivalent to the first year of Track 1.

Admission will be highly competitive. We plan to enrol about 25 students in each year of the PhD.

The new (Track 1) PhD programme will require two years of course work, leading to an intermediate (MRes) qualification. The first year will be devoted to a rigorous study of the fundamentals in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. During the second year, students will take courses in two fields of their choice and start their own research by preparing a research paper. The following years will be devoted to full time research and completion of a dissertation. This structure is similar to that offered by most economics departments in the United States.

For students who have completed an MSc programme upon entrance, the new (Track 2) PhD programme (2004/5) requires only one year of course work, as these students enter directly in year two of the MRes/PhD programme.
quote
Russ
Your text is not from the Law Department but from the Department of Economics. Still I think it will generally be the same for a PhD in law...
Your text is not from the Law Department but from the Department of Economics. Still I think it will generally be the same for a PhD in law...
quote
Kek
In the UK now,the vast majority of Universities and especially Oxbridge and London,place a research candidate on "probation" for the first year.
That means you are not immediately accepted on a PhD course.You register for an MPhil or MRes (Masters in Research)...
At the end ogf the first year you are judged as to whether you have the aptitude to complete an orginal body of Research

At Oxbridge it is common,to complete an MPhil, therafter not to be accepted for the doctorate and then have to complete a PhD elsewhere.In fact it is very clear that you are on probation.........
In the UK now,the vast majority of Universities and especially Oxbridge and London,place a research candidate on "probation" for the first year.
That means you are not immediately accepted on a PhD course.You register for an MPhil or MRes (Masters in Research)...
At the end ogf the first year you are judged as to whether you have the aptitude to complete an orginal body of Research

At Oxbridge it is common,to complete an MPhil, therafter not to be accepted for the doctorate and then have to complete a PhD elsewhere.In fact it is very clear that you are on probation.........
quote

Reply to Post

Related Articles

Post-LLM Careers in Academia are Abundant

Jul 15, 2019

Whether through a PhD or J.S.D., there are well-trodden paths into academia for LL.M. graduates, but the competition for jobs is intense

More Articles