Scots Law LLB in Canada


Having accepted an offer to undertake my LLB at Edinburgh come Fall 2009, I thought I would solicit some advice from those Canadians who have attempted to re-enter Canada with the intent to practice, particularly in Ontario.

I realize there is something of a deficit with an LLB in Scots Law, but I was hoping someone would tell me what their exact experience, duration of courses back in Canada, etc, was. It may not be too late for me to take an offer from an English school if my Edinburgh LLB makes things a logistical nightmare for me.

Appreciate any advice you guys have,

Christopher
Having accepted an offer to undertake my LLB at Edinburgh come Fall 2009, I thought I would solicit some advice from those Canadians who have attempted to re-enter Canada with the intent to practice, particularly in Ontario.

I realize there is something of a deficit with an LLB in Scots Law, but I was hoping someone would tell me what their exact experience, duration of courses back in Canada, etc, was. It may not be too late for me to take an offer from an English school if my Edinburgh LLB makes things a logistical nightmare for me.

Appreciate any advice you guys have,

Christopher

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Kerfuffle
Check out the NCA guidelines - I doubt having a Scots LLB will put you at any more of a disadvantage compared to any other Commonwealth LLB holder.

Ultimately, if you want to practice back in Canada, don't go to a foreign law school, because it's very protectionist regarding foreign trained lawyers.
Check out the NCA guidelines - I doubt having a Scots LLB will put you at any more of a disadvantage compared to any other Commonwealth LLB holder.

Ultimately, if you want to practice back in Canada, don't go to a foreign law school, because it's very protectionist regarding foreign trained lawyers.
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SuzieQ
I agree with Kerfuffle. If you're Canadian and plan on practising in Canada, you're better off doing your law degree in Canada. It's almost always cheaper and you don't have to worry about the NCA process (which applies to all provinces except for Quebec). Most people I know who have done a law degree abroad either have to take several (i.e. 10) exams or do two years at a Canadian law school. After that, you would still need to pass the bar and article.

If you're eager for the experience of studying in the UK, you can always do a semester or a year abroad during your Canadian LLB/JD or do an LLM after finishing up in Canada.
I agree with Kerfuffle. If you're Canadian and plan on practising in Canada, you're better off doing your law degree in Canada. It's almost always cheaper and you don't have to worry about the NCA process (which applies to all provinces except for Quebec). Most people I know who have done a law degree abroad either have to take several (i.e. 10) exams or do two years at a Canadian law school. After that, you would still need to pass the bar and article.

If you're eager for the experience of studying in the UK, you can always do a semester or a year abroad during your Canadian LLB/JD or do an LLM after finishing up in Canada.

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I am a newly qualified solicitor based in Scotland and looking to move to Vancouver. Does anyone have any advice before jumping into it? From what I've read it is incredibly difficult to practice in Canada as a foreigner. I speak French which may be of benefit. Most of the posts seem to relate to people who have studied abroad but returned to Canada to practice from the outset. Is it the same scenario for qualified solicitors in other jurisdictions? Would it be advantageous to do a masters in Vancouver or somewhere in Canada or an unnecessary expense? Any help much appreciated.
I am a newly qualified solicitor based in Scotland and looking to move to Vancouver. Does anyone have any advice before jumping into it? From what I've read it is incredibly difficult to practice in Canada as a foreigner. I speak French which may be of benefit. Most of the posts seem to relate to people who have studied abroad but returned to Canada to practice from the outset. Is it the same scenario for qualified solicitors in other jurisdictions? Would it be advantageous to do a masters in Vancouver or somewhere in Canada or an unnecessary expense? Any help much appreciated.
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