Lawyer Immigration to Canada


AleksLLM

So you think it would be at least a bit easy in other countries? I thought of UK but then the new visa requirements came up. I'm pretty confused now as to where to do my LLM from as I don't want to settle in India. Any ideas?

If you want to immigrate EU would be easier once you have an offer as they have blue card immigration work visa in thw most of the EU countries now. It leads to a PR status within 2 years or so depending on the circumstances and the country.
Ideally, try to get into a decent LLM program in the USA, pass the NY bar and look for jobs in the foreign offices of US firms in your country and abroad. Alternatively, do an LLM in the UK, pass the solicitors exam for England and Wales and search for job positions in UK law firms outside of the UK. You might need a bar status in India and some experience for the latter option if memory serves.

<blockquote>So you think it would be at least a bit easy in other countries? I thought of UK but then the new visa requirements came up. I'm pretty confused now as to where to do my LLM from as I don't want to settle in India. Any ideas? </blockquote>
If you want to immigrate EU would be easier once you have an offer as they have blue card immigration work visa in thw most of the EU countries now. It leads to a PR status within 2 years or so depending on the circumstances and the country.
Ideally, try to get into a decent LLM program in the USA, pass the NY bar and look for jobs in the foreign offices of US firms in your country and abroad. Alternatively, do an LLM in the UK, pass the solicitors exam for England and Wales and search for job positions in UK law firms outside of the UK. You might need a bar status in India and some experience for the latter option if memory serves.
quote
SeanTee

Hi,
I am currently in my 2nd year of the LLB programme in the UK (Cardiff University), and I plan to be moving to Canada, and practise as a Corporate lawyer.

However, seeing that I have a foreign degree (UK LLB), I am aware that I need to pass the challenge exams by the NCA. As such, I would like to ask the following questions:

1. What is the difference between a Canadian LLM and the exams by NCA?
2. If I want to be called to the bar in Canada, is an LLM required?
3. What does the NCA assess?
4. How is the demand for foreign lawyers in Canada?

Looking forward to your replies. Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Sean

Hi,
I am currently in my 2nd year of the LLB programme in the UK (Cardiff University), and I plan to be moving to Canada, and practise as a Corporate lawyer.

However, seeing that I have a foreign degree (UK LLB), I am aware that I need to pass the challenge exams by the NCA. As such, I would like to ask the following questions:

1. What is the difference between a Canadian LLM and the exams by NCA?
2. If I want to be called to the bar in Canada, is an LLM required?
3. What does the NCA assess?
4. How is the demand for foreign lawyers in Canada?

Looking forward to your replies. Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Sean
quote
grumpyJD

1. An LLM in Canada is the same as an LLM elsewhere. It won't get you any closer to practicing. There are some Canadian universities that offer a 1 year post-LLB course for foreign grads that will exempt you from the NCA requirements (UBC, U of A, U of T). Basically you will be taking some version of the standard Canadian 1L courses and the NCA will deem that sufficient, i.e. exempt you from taking exams is those subjects. It's expensive but more convenient than taking all the NCA exams. But it's not an LLM- it has more practical value but less academic standing.
2. No. Very few people do an LLM before getting called to the bar in Canada. Most people take an LLM after being called, if at all.
3. The NCA will look at your transcript and evaluate your coursework. If you're lucky, some courses you have taken can exempt you from the NCA examination in that subject. Some subjects like Professional Ethics (specific to Canada) and Canadian Constitutional Law, you will absolutely have to take (unless it was taught in Cardiff which I doubt). Coming from a UK law school, you will get more credit than most foreign grads since there is a lot of overlap pre-1948. You can probably be exempted from contracts and torts, I imagine. Most UK grads that I know had to take 4-6 NCA exams.
4. Very poor. Getting into law school in Canada is very competitive and hiring partners tend to hire from the programs that they know and respect. Most local grads usually find jobs without too much trouble-- although Ontario has been bad for a while and Alberta is slow since oil prices dropped. Canadians who are not accepted at Canadian law schools (and who can afford it), have traditionally tried their luck in the UK and Australia (esp. Bond, Birmingham, Sheffield, Leicester). There is a huge perception problem-- a Canadian with a UK or Aus law degree has a real scarlet letter. They will struggle to find articles because everyone will assume that they're rich kids who couldn't get into law school in Canada. Once you prove yourself in practice, it won't matter but the hard part is breaking through that barrier and actually getting articles. If you're a UK national, the stigma isn't the same but local applicants will always get preference for articles. Oxbridge or LSE grads might get more interest, I imagine, but it's pretty rough. Most firms get so many applicants that they look for reasons to reject applications. They can fill their spots without hiring foreigners and there's a sense of obligation to hire from the local applicant pool.

1. An LLM in Canada is the same as an LLM elsewhere. It won't get you any closer to practicing. There are some Canadian universities that offer a 1 year post-LLB course for foreign grads that will exempt you from the NCA requirements (UBC, U of A, U of T). Basically you will be taking some version of the standard Canadian 1L courses and the NCA will deem that sufficient, i.e. exempt you from taking exams is those subjects. It's expensive but more convenient than taking all the NCA exams. But it's not an LLM- it has more practical value but less academic standing.
2. No. Very few people do an LLM before getting called to the bar in Canada. Most people take an LLM after being called, if at all.
3. The NCA will look at your transcript and evaluate your coursework. If you're lucky, some courses you have taken can exempt you from the NCA examination in that subject. Some subjects like Professional Ethics (specific to Canada) and Canadian Constitutional Law, you will absolutely have to take (unless it was taught in Cardiff which I doubt). Coming from a UK law school, you will get more credit than most foreign grads since there is a lot of overlap pre-1948. You can probably be exempted from contracts and torts, I imagine. Most UK grads that I know had to take 4-6 NCA exams.
4. Very poor. Getting into law school in Canada is very competitive and hiring partners tend to hire from the programs that they know and respect. Most local grads usually find jobs without too much trouble-- although Ontario has been bad for a while and Alberta is slow since oil prices dropped. Canadians who are not accepted at Canadian law schools (and who can afford it), have traditionally tried their luck in the UK and Australia (esp. Bond, Birmingham, Sheffield, Leicester). There is a huge perception problem-- a Canadian with a UK or Aus law degree has a real scarlet letter. They will struggle to find articles because everyone will assume that they're rich kids who couldn't get into law school in Canada. Once you prove yourself in practice, it won't matter but the hard part is breaking through that barrier and actually getting articles. If you're a UK national, the stigma isn't the same but local applicants will always get preference for articles. Oxbridge or LSE grads might get more interest, I imagine, but it's pretty rough. Most firms get so many applicants that they look for reasons to reject applications. They can fill their spots without hiring foreigners and there's a sense of obligation to hire from the local applicant pool.
quote

read almost all the posts thoroughly, is there any other way to get extended work permit and some tips and tricks to find legal job there? I'm very determined to invtest my time in Canada.
I'm just holding a BALLB degree from India right now, and the bar license here with a few months of practice. any suggestion for how long should i work here before starting LLM from Canada.
I'd really appreciate the full names of the universities which would be a bit equivalent to NCA exams (a few will go).

read almost all the posts thoroughly, is there any other way to get extended work permit and some tips and tricks to find legal job there? I'm very determined to invtest my time in Canada.
I'm just holding a BALLB degree from India right now, and the bar license here with a few months of practice. any suggestion for how long should i work here before starting LLM from Canada.
I'd really appreciate the full names of the universities which would be a bit equivalent to NCA exams (a few will go).
quote
jasminejar

I am thinking of getting a LLM degree in Canada to satisfy NCA requirements too.
The following LLMs should be the only ones that offers 5 complete
mandatory NCA equivalent courses:

*Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC’s Master of Laws (Common Law)
* University of Toronto:Faculty of Law GPLLM
* Yok University Osgoode: Canadian Common Law LL

UBC and York need minimum 75% LLB grades
UofT need minimum 75% + 3 years of professional experiences

I guess these LLMs are very popular and selective (eg. GPLLM only 17% admission rate),
because the tuition fees raises almost every year.
tuition fees 2016/2017:
UBC: Domestic Students $836.90 / International Students $976.38 per credit (30 credits)
York: Domestic Students $22,982.8 / International Students $33,372.66
UofT: Domestic Students $33,850 / International Students $53,360

[Edited by jasminejar on Sep 05, 2016]

I am thinking of getting a LLM degree in Canada to satisfy NCA requirements too.
The following LLMs should be the only ones that offers 5 complete
mandatory NCA equivalent courses:

*Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC’s Master of Laws (Common Law)
* University of Toronto:Faculty of Law GPLLM
* Yok University Osgoode: Canadian Common Law LL

UBC and York need minimum 75% LLB grades
UofT need minimum 75% + 3 years of professional experiences

I guess these LLMs are very popular and selective (eg. GPLLM only 17% admission rate),
because the tuition fees raises almost every year.
tuition fees 2016/2017:
UBC: Domestic Students $836.90 / International Students $976.38 per credit (30 credits)
York: Domestic Students $22,982.8 / International Students $33,372.66
UofT: Domestic Students $33,850 / International Students $53,360



quote

Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.

[quote]Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.[/quote]
quote

Hey Mumtaz,

Any luck even I am planning to move to Canada by applying a PR. Please let me know if you have managed to get any details.

Hey Mumtaz,

Any luck even I am planning to move to Canada by applying a PR. Please let me know if you have managed to get any details.
quote
grumpyJD

I am thinking of getting a LLM degree in Canada to satisfy NCA requirements too.
The following LLMs should be the only ones that offers 5 complete
mandatory NCA equivalent courses:

*Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC’s Master of Laws (Common Law)
* University of Toronto:Faculty of Law GPLLM
* Yok University Osgoode: Canadian Common Law LL

UBC and York need minimum 75% LLB grades
UofT need minimum 75% + 3 years of professional experiences

I guess these LLMs are very popular and selective (eg. GPLLM only 17% admission rate),
because the tuition fees raises almost every year.
tuition fees 2016/2017:
UBC: Domestic Students $836.90 / International Students $976.38 per credit (30 credits)
York: Domestic Students $22,982.8 / International Students $33,372.66
UofT: Domestic Students $33,850 / International Students $53,360

If you can tolerate living in Edmonton, the University of Alberta offers a similar program. I don't know the cost but it's a much cheaper place to live than Vancouver or Toronto.

[quote]I am thinking of getting a LLM degree in Canada to satisfy NCA requirements too.
The following LLMs should be the only ones that offers 5 complete
mandatory NCA equivalent courses:

*Peter A. Allard School of Law at UBC’s Master of Laws (Common Law)
* University of Toronto:Faculty of Law GPLLM
* Yok University Osgoode: Canadian Common Law LL

UBC and York need minimum 75% LLB grades
UofT need minimum 75% + 3 years of professional experiences

I guess these LLMs are very popular and selective (eg. GPLLM only 17% admission rate),
because the tuition fees raises almost every year.
tuition fees 2016/2017:
UBC: Domestic Students $836.90 / International Students $976.38 per credit (30 credits)
York: Domestic Students $22,982.8 / International Students $33,372.66
UofT: Domestic Students $33,850 / International Students $53,360

If you can tolerate living in Edmonton, the University of Alberta offers a similar program. I don't know the cost but it's a much cheaper place to live than Vancouver or Toronto.

[/quote]
quote

Hi, I'm planning to do a JD in Canada after completing BCom LLB in India. Does anyone​ have any idea about job prospects for foreign JD students?
Would be great if I could connect with someone who has done JD after LLB.

Hi, I'm planning to do a JD in Canada after completing BCom LLB in India. Does anyone​ have any idea about job prospects for foreign JD students?
Would be great if I could connect with someone who has done JD after LLB.
quote
swet pharm...

Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.

[quote]Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.[/quote]
quote
Lawsco

I am a dual qualified lawyer from Europe. The truth is that it is not so easy to be completely accepted into the legal profession here as equivalent, or if you have something new to offer, regardless of your qualifications. I have lived here for many years.

Things are changing with the current government, but it can still be a struggle. Much is based on trust. I think things are easier now, at least for some. Good luck!

These are new times, albeit too late for me. I am very hopeful for others.

I am a dual qualified lawyer from Europe. The truth is that it is not so easy to be completely accepted into the legal profession here as equivalent, or if you have something new to offer, regardless of your qualifications. I have lived here for many years.

Things are changing with the current government, but it can still be a struggle. Much is based on trust. I think things are easier now, at least for some. Good luck!

These are new times, albeit too late for me. I am very hopeful for others.
quote

I'm a practicing advocate in India having a experience of above 10!years in taxation.
I'm applying for PR of Canada.
What will be the senrio for me there?
What course I have to do there?
Is good LLM or NBA exams?
Is it possible to give exams in India?
Is there any option for work in taxation and accounting field for me?

I'm a practicing advocate in India having a experience of above 10!years in taxation.
I'm applying for PR of Canada.
What will be the senrio for me there?
What course I have to do there?
Is good LLM or NBA exams?
Is it possible to give exams in India?
Is there any option for work in taxation and accounting field for me?
quote

Hi,
I agree with nadalaw that there is no immigration route for lawyers to canada and it will come under general category which may take any time between 3-6 years time. So, the best option to immigrate to canada is as a student.

You cannot immigrate under canadian experience calss as you dont have any prior work exp in canada. If you opt to have your graduation (LLM) from canada which will be of one year duration after completion of your LLM, you can get work permit of one year duration during which time you can work there and get some canadian experience. Thereafter if you can manage to get a job there then you can apply for your PR and work there. Normally one can apply for citizenship only after staying and working there for at least 3 or 4 years.
Please note that studing LLM and NCA both are different faces of the same coin. Becuase even though you did your LLM you can not work there in core legal field unless you have finished your NCA requqirement and enrolled as attorney there. So, during the time you have your LLM you have finish your NCA and need to undergo articling for 10 months and there after you can be called to the bar of any procince of your choice. Graduates from India will normally have to give 5 or 6 exmans (in cases even more) in NCA, however its all depends on your grades in your LLB.

So, for all this, initially one has to suffer and struggle initially for 2 or 3 years. Don't expect the moment you land in Canada somebody will extend redcorpet welcome with good job with hefty salary. If you read the experiences of various people of various nationalities on CIC Canada website, then you can see how they struggled initially to settle in their dream life in Canada. So, one should have that mch commitment before deciding for this step. As a fresh graduate without any family obligations one can dare to achieve this, that's the reason for my question in the earlier post.

As far the Jobs are concerned, yes, I heared from different sources, right now the legal jobs scenario is not that much good. But people are there who achieved this by their sheer commitement for excellence. The crex of the matter will in there where you will do your LLM. U of Toronto, Osgoode, UBC are best known univ in Canada.

This is all entirely my personal views depending on my research done earlier last year.

Hope my views are of some help to you.
-LegalIndia

[quote]Hi,
I agree with nadalaw that there is no immigration route for lawyers to canada and it will come under general category which may take any time between 3-6 years time. So, the best option to immigrate to canada is as a student.

You cannot immigrate under canadian experience calss as you dont have any prior work exp in canada. If you opt to have your graduation (LLM) from canada which will be of one year duration after completion of your LLM, you can get work permit of one year duration during which time you can work there and get some canadian experience. Thereafter if you can manage to get a job there then you can apply for your PR and work there. Normally one can apply for citizenship only after staying and working there for at least 3 or 4 years.
Please note that studing LLM and NCA both are different faces of the same coin. Becuase even though you did your LLM you can not work there in core legal field unless you have finished your NCA requqirement and enrolled as attorney there. So, during the time you have your LLM you have finish your NCA and need to undergo articling for 10 months and there after you can be called to the bar of any procince of your choice. Graduates from India will normally have to give 5 or 6 exmans (in cases even more) in NCA, however its all depends on your grades in your LLB.

So, for all this, initially one has to suffer and struggle initially for 2 or 3 years. Don't expect the moment you land in Canada somebody will extend redcorpet welcome with good job with hefty salary. If you read the experiences of various people of various nationalities on CIC Canada website, then you can see how they struggled initially to settle in their dream life in Canada. So, one should have that mch commitment before deciding for this step. As a fresh graduate without any family obligations one can dare to achieve this, that's the reason for my question in the earlier post.

As far the Jobs are concerned, yes, I heared from different sources, right now the legal jobs scenario is not that much good. But people are there who achieved this by their sheer commitement for excellence. The crex of the matter will in there where you will do your LLM. U of Toronto, Osgoode, UBC are best known univ in Canada.

This is all entirely my personal views depending on my research done earlier last year.

Hope my views are of some help to you.
-LegalIndia[/quote]
quote

Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.

[quote]Hello Everyone,

I would appreciate a few replies to my queries below.

1. If some one is a Lawyer in India, under which Immigration Category can the person immigrate to Canada?

2. If the person immigrates in Canada experience Class, one needs either 1 yr of study and 2 yr of work experience or 2 yr of study and 1 yr of work experience in Canada. If a person comes for a 1 yr LLM study program, one gets a 1 yr post graduate work permit which cannot be extended? So what are the options? Do another certificate?

3. Also, the above process is for immigration. The NCA process is different. Any idea how many NCA exams an Indian Lawyer has to give and how long it takes? How difficult are they?

So, basically how long will a person take to become a permanent resident and qualified to work in Canada?

After that, what kind of jobs can a person get?

Look forward to replies. Thanks.[/quote]
quote

Hello,

I am a lawyer from India (called to the bar in 2006). I did my masters from singapore. worked in singapore and India for 3 years and then moved to Toronto last June. I had 5 papers to give though most of the Indians have been given anywhere between 4 to 5 papers.

People usually split the exams between 2 sessions. The best route for u would be to apply for ur L.L.M and then get an open work permit and then apply for immigration.

The scene for foreign lawyers is quite bad. There are jobs available in the market (legal assistant,paralegal, compliance, contract management etc). Once you have Canadian experience it would be easier finding a job.

Since u r a fresher, my suggestion wud be to work for a year or 2 get some experience and then apply for ur L.L.M.

[quote]Hello,

I am a lawyer from India (called to the bar in 2006). I did my masters from singapore. worked in singapore and India for 3 years and then moved to Toronto last June. I had 5 papers to give though most of the Indians have been given anywhere between 4 to 5 papers.

People usually split the exams between 2 sessions. The best route for u would be to apply for ur L.L.M and then get an open work permit and then apply for immigration.

The scene for foreign lawyers is quite bad. There are jobs available in the market (legal assistant,paralegal, compliance, contract management etc). Once you have Canadian experience it would be easier finding a job.

Since u r a fresher, my suggestion wud be to work for a year or 2 get some experience and then apply for ur L.L.M.[/quote]
quote

Hello,Tanushree

i am completed by bcom and LLB in india and currently i am in canada as an international student of business course is it any way i can go in canadian legal field in future like get enrolled in bar or nca may be i don't have any idea can i do LLM directly will it help or JD whats that can you please help me to get some infromation regarding same.

Thanking you

Hello,Tanushree

i am completed by bcom and LLB in india and currently i am in canada as an international student of business course is it any way i can go in canadian legal field in future like get enrolled in bar or nca may be i don't have any idea can i do LLM directly will it help or JD whats that can you please help me to get some infromation regarding same.

Thanking you
quote

Hello,

I am a lawyer from India (called to the bar in 2006). I did my masters from singapore. worked in singapore and India for 3 years and then moved to Toronto last June. I had 5 papers to give though most of the Indians have been given anywhere between 4 to 5 papers.

People usually split the exams between 2 sessions. The best route for u would be to apply for ur L.L.M and then get an open work permit and then apply for immigration.

The scene for foreign lawyers is quite bad. There are jobs available in the market (legal assistant,paralegal, compliance, contract management etc). Once you have Canadian experience it would be easier finding a job.

Since u r a fresher, my suggestion wud be to work for a year or 2 get some experience and then apply for ur L.L.M.

[quote]Hello,

I am a lawyer from India (called to the bar in 2006). I did my masters from singapore. worked in singapore and India for 3 years and then moved to Toronto last June. I had 5 papers to give though most of the Indians have been given anywhere between 4 to 5 papers.

People usually split the exams between 2 sessions. The best route for u would be to apply for ur L.L.M and then get an open work permit and then apply for immigration.

The scene for foreign lawyers is quite bad. There are jobs available in the market (legal assistant,paralegal, compliance, contract management etc). Once you have Canadian experience it would be easier finding a job.

Since u r a fresher, my suggestion wud be to work for a year or 2 get some experience and then apply for ur L.L.M.[/quote]
quote

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