Prospects in Australia after LLM from UK


rossi
I have done LLM from University of London in Commercial and Corporate Law with no bachelors in relevant field. I need to know what are my prospects in Australia after this, which degree should i opt for in order to get a PR and a nice respectable job and eventually settle in Australia. And also tell me am i eligible for JD on the basis of my LLM ???

One more question, what is the future of lawyers in Australia (international students).
Is it true that Lawyers and Doctors are on BOOM in Australia ??
I have done LLM from University of London in Commercial and Corporate Law with no bachelors in relevant field. I need to know what are my prospects in Australia after this, which degree should i opt for in order to get a PR and a nice respectable job and eventually settle in Australia. And also tell me am i eligible for JD on the basis of my LLM ???

One more question, what is the future of lawyers in Australia (international students).
Is it true that Lawyers and Doctors are on BOOM in Australia ??
quote
Tommyish
Hi Rossi,
Are you actually from the UK or have you pursued your LLM in London? I believe your chances of working as a lawyer in Australia may be different depending on your nationality. Generally speaking you will be able to apply for a visa but should consider the different types of Visa.
Getting a permanent one is not all that easy. It takes time and commitment. If you have a student visa and a work permit, you can only work up to 20 hours per week while you are studying. With the General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa scheme professional and skilled people between the ages of 18 and 49 are allowed to migrate permanently to Australia. Besides you will have to have a sufficient level of English which I assume you have after pursuing an LLM in the UK, have work experience, crucial qualifications and meet the Points Test. You may also be eligible for an Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa, if an Australian employer is willing to nominate you.
Lawyers and doctors are still required in Australia but demand decreases. Your chances will be better in rural or suburban areas. Overall about 50,000 lawyers practise in Australia. Australia has the highest per capita number of law schools in the world but people don't want to go to rural areas to work. By the way, foreign lawyers will not have to obtain local qualifications to practise in Australia but all states, except Western Australia, expect law graduates to finish Practical Legal Training (PLT) before being admitted to practice. You will also need an approved law degree (LLB or JD). Your LLM in Corporate law is not a bad choice. I believe it is one of the subjects in demand, followed by property law and litigation and dispute resolution.
Last but not least it might help to see a qualified immigration lawyer - they can advise you on options open to you.
Good luck!
Hi Rossi,
Are you actually from the UK or have you pursued your LLM in London? I believe your chances of working as a lawyer in Australia may be different depending on your nationality. Generally speaking you will be able to apply for a visa but should consider the different types of Visa.
Getting a permanent one is not all that easy. It takes time and commitment. If you have a student visa and a work permit, you can only work up to 20 hours per week while you are studying. With the General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa scheme professional and skilled people between the ages of 18 and 49 are allowed to migrate permanently to Australia. Besides you will have to have a sufficient level of English which I assume you have after pursuing an LLM in the UK, have work experience, crucial qualifications and meet the Points Test. You may also be eligible for an Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa, if an Australian employer is willing to nominate you.
Lawyers and doctors are still required in Australia but demand decreases. Your chances will be better in rural or suburban areas. Overall about 50,000 lawyers practise in Australia. Australia has the highest per capita number of law schools in the world but people don't want to go to rural areas to work. By the way, foreign lawyers will not have to obtain local qualifications to practise in Australia but all states, except Western Australia, expect law graduates to finish Practical Legal Training (PLT) before being admitted to practice. You will also need an approved law degree (LLB or JD). Your LLM in Corporate law is not a bad choice. I believe it is one of the subjects in demand, followed by property law and litigation and dispute resolution.
Last but not least it might help to see a qualified immigration lawyer - they can advise you on options open to you.
Good luck!
quote
rossi
Thanks for the info. I did external program of UoL and i am not from UK i am from Pakistan.

What would you say if i apply for JD on the basis of my LLM and then after its completion take the PLT? I would be getting a postgrad study work visa for 2 years after JD and thats when i would take PLT. What would you suggest on this option ??? And yes i would not want to work in suburban areas.
Thanks for the info. I did external program of UoL and i am not from UK i am from Pakistan.

What would you say if i apply for JD on the basis of my LLM and then after its completion take the PLT? I would be getting a postgrad study work visa for 2 years after JD and thats when i would take PLT. What would you suggest on this option ??? And yes i would not want to work in suburban areas.
quote
Tommyish
Hi Rossi,
Besides completion of an approved practical legal training (PLT), a supervised traineeship at a firm, admission to Roll of Lawyers and an application for a practising certificate, you must have completed an approved law degree (LLB or JD) to practise as a lawyer in Australia. A JD won't make you any more likely to get a job than an LLB but a JD lasts longer (generally 4 years) so your fees will go up. If you already have an undergraduate degree the Juris Doctor (JD) programmes last three years, although some offer the fast track version: a JD in two years. Some universities run bridging courses for non-lawyers, too. It seems to be that the better law schools are the ones which offer JDs such as Sydney, UWA and UNSW- New South Wales. Why dont you contact one of them to figure out your chances?
Hi Rossi,
Besides completion of an approved practical legal training (PLT), a supervised traineeship at a firm, admission to Roll of Lawyers and an application for a practising certificate, you must have completed an approved law degree (LLB or JD) to practise as a lawyer in Australia. A JD won't make you any more likely to get a job than an LLB but a JD lasts longer (generally 4 years) so your fees will go up. If you already have an undergraduate degree the Juris Doctor (JD) programmes last three years, although some offer the fast track version: a JD in two years. Some universities run bridging courses for non-lawyers, too. It seems to be that the better law schools are the ones which offer JDs such as Sydney, UWA and UNSW- New South Wales. Why don’t you contact one of them to figure out your chances?
quote
aussi34
Hey Rossi, You obtained a law degree in England right? Then you should be eligible to complete the Two-Year J.D. for international attorneys. Common law students do not need to follow the first-year curriculum, and will spend both of their years in the Two-Year J.D. Program taking upper-level courses. Besides, as you are a qualified overseas applicant holding an academic qualification in law you may obtain a skills assessment from the Legal Admissions Board.
Hey Rossi, You obtained a law degree in England right? Then you should be eligible to complete the Two-Year J.D. for international attorneys. Common law students do not need to follow the first-year curriculum, and will spend both of their years in the Two-Year J.D. Program taking upper-level courses. Besides, as you are a qualified overseas applicant holding an academic qualification in law you may obtain a skills assessment from the Legal Admissions Board.
quote

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