Practice in Australia with an LLB from England? Help??


someone
Hello,

I'm currently doing my llb from the University of London as a distance learner. The degree is a QLD in England and Wales. I live in Asia.
There may be a chance that I move to Australia, but I'm finding the jurisdictional differences a little confusing. I have a few questions. Would anyone care to help me please?

1) Is my degree sufficient to apply for a legal practise course in Australia, or am I required to undertake a practice course(LPC) and get a licence from England first?

2) The average degree classification required for admission to the LPC in England is a 2:2 (lower 2nd class honours). Is there any such criteria in Australia? How should I expect my marks to be assessed?

3) As far as I'm aware different states have different practice methods. I'd like to know which state requires the least amount of time to finish the course(s), and where I'm more likely to find good job opportunities.

Thank you in advance.
Hello,

I'm currently doing my llb from the University of London as a distance learner. The degree is a QLD in England and Wales. I live in Asia.
There may be a chance that I move to Australia, but I'm finding the jurisdictional differences a little confusing. I have a few questions. Would anyone care to help me please?

1) Is my degree sufficient to apply for a legal practise course in Australia, or am I required to undertake a practice course(LPC) and get a licence from England first?

2) The average degree classification required for admission to the LPC in England is a 2:2 (lower 2nd class honours). Is there any such criteria in Australia? How should I expect my marks to be assessed?

3) As far as I'm aware different states have different practice methods. I'd like to know which state requires the least amount of time to finish the course(s), and where I'm more likely to find good job opportunities.

Thank you in advance.

quote
someone
Anybody there?

Any suggestion would do!!
Anybody there?

Any suggestion would do!!
quote
Hi Someone,

I have an English law degree and was supposed to move out to oz but it didn't work out, hopefully i should be able to offer some answer to your questions:

1) You have to get your degree assessed - i was told by NSW i would have to take 10 modules to convert my degree to an australian degree. if you have completed the LPC this would be about 3/4 modules.

2) I think a 2.2 would suffice although a 2.1 would be better as alot of aussies spend 5 years at university studying double degrees so you would be competing with this.

3) Avoid Victoria it is probably hardest, but once you qualify in one state you can transfer to any other. I think NSW is probably the best choice as you can study the extra modules through LPAB (check out http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lpab) and complete your practice course with the college of law. This involves 16 weeks full time study and 16 weeks training (alot less that the english LPC +2 year training contract.)

My advice would be complete your LPC in one year, get your degree assessed by NSW, complete the extra modules while doing your college of law and training and then you should be qualified.

The rules may have changed since my attempts but hopefully i'm not too far from their rules.
good luck!
Hi Someone,

I have an English law degree and was supposed to move out to oz but it didn't work out, hopefully i should be able to offer some answer to your questions:

1) You have to get your degree assessed - i was told by NSW i would have to take 10 modules to convert my degree to an australian degree. if you have completed the LPC this would be about 3/4 modules.

2) I think a 2.2 would suffice although a 2.1 would be better as alot of aussies spend 5 years at university studying double degrees so you would be competing with this.

3) Avoid Victoria it is probably hardest, but once you qualify in one state you can transfer to any other. I think NSW is probably the best choice as you can study the extra modules through LPAB (check out http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lpab) and complete your practice course with the college of law. This involves 16 weeks full time study and 16 weeks training (alot less that the english LPC +2 year training contract.)

My advice would be complete your LPC in one year, get your degree assessed by NSW, complete the extra modules while doing your college of law and training and then you should be qualified.

The rules may have changed since my attempts but hopefully i'm not too far from their rules.
good luck!


quote
Hi Someone,

I have an English law degree and was supposed to move out to oz but it didn't work out, hopefully i should be able to offer some answer to your questions:

1) You have to get your degree assessed - i was told by NSW i would have to take 10 modules to convert my degree to an australian degree. if you have completed the LPC this would be about 3/4 modules.

2) I think a 2.2 would suffice although a 2.1 would be better as alot of aussies spend 5 years at university studying double degrees so you would be competing with this.

3) Avoid Victoria it is probably hardest, but once you qualify in one state you can transfer to any other. I think NSW is probably the best choice as you can study the extra modules through LPAB (check out http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lpab) and complete your practice course with the college of law. This involves 16 weeks full time study and 16 weeks training (alot less that the english LPC +2 year training contract.)

My advice would be complete your LPC in one year, get your degree assessed by NSW, complete the extra modules while doing your college of law and training and then you should be qualified.

The rules may have changed since my attempts but hopefully i'm not too far from their rules.
good luck!




Just to clarify some issues, hence digging up this thread.

You may only register yourself as a Student-at-Law and undertake the law courses offered by both the Uni of Sydney and LPAB if you are living in Australia. This is not applicable for students who are living outside Australia. However, the fees are relatively much cheaper but yet more difficult to pass. I have read that the failure rates are quite high.

I have a qualifying law degree from UK as well and I was advised that I am required to take 12 additional subjects to meet the academic requirements before I undertake the PLC.

Also, you are not allowed to undertake the PLC concurrently whilst fulfilling the academic requirements, unless you are exempted from 17 subjects out of the 20 examinable subjects. Either that, be studying only 1 to 2 subjects to satisfy the academic requirements and apply for an early enrolment for your PLC.

Actually, I won't say that this route is actually faster than the UK route because to study for 12 additional subjects, that is like doing another LLB again altogether. And you ought to note that if you aren't registering yourself as a student-at-law with LPAB, you are to register with other accredited Unis in Australia and that the availability of subjects are subjected to different trimester. So if you aren't working, you may perhaps attempt to complete all 10 or 12 subjects within one year, which spreads out to about taking 4 to 5 subjects per trimester. But if you are working full time, like me, the process will definitely prolong because there is no way you are able to cope.

But I think completing the LPC may get you some exemptions here and there.

Hope this helps!
<blockquote>Hi Someone,

I have an English law degree and was supposed to move out to oz but it didn't work out, hopefully i should be able to offer some answer to your questions:

1) You have to get your degree assessed - i was told by NSW i would have to take 10 modules to convert my degree to an australian degree. if you have completed the LPC this would be about 3/4 modules.

2) I think a 2.2 would suffice although a 2.1 would be better as alot of aussies spend 5 years at university studying double degrees so you would be competing with this.

3) Avoid Victoria it is probably hardest, but once you qualify in one state you can transfer to any other. I think NSW is probably the best choice as you can study the extra modules through LPAB (check out http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lpab) and complete your practice course with the college of law. This involves 16 weeks full time study and 16 weeks training (alot less that the english LPC +2 year training contract.)

My advice would be complete your LPC in one year, get your degree assessed by NSW, complete the extra modules while doing your college of law and training and then you should be qualified.

The rules may have changed since my attempts but hopefully i'm not too far from their rules.
good luck!


</blockquote>

Just to clarify some issues, hence digging up this thread.

You may only register yourself as a Student-at-Law and undertake the law courses offered by both the Uni of Sydney and LPAB if you are living in Australia. This is not applicable for students who are living outside Australia. However, the fees are relatively much cheaper but yet more difficult to pass. I have read that the failure rates are quite high.

I have a qualifying law degree from UK as well and I was advised that I am required to take 12 additional subjects to meet the academic requirements before I undertake the PLC.

Also, you are not allowed to undertake the PLC concurrently whilst fulfilling the academic requirements, unless you are exempted from 17 subjects out of the 20 examinable subjects. Either that, be studying only 1 to 2 subjects to satisfy the academic requirements and apply for an early enrolment for your PLC.

Actually, I won't say that this route is actually faster than the UK route because to study for 12 additional subjects, that is like doing another LLB again altogether. And you ought to note that if you aren't registering yourself as a student-at-law with LPAB, you are to register with other accredited Unis in Australia and that the availability of subjects are subjected to different trimester. So if you aren't working, you may perhaps attempt to complete all 10 or 12 subjects within one year, which spreads out to about taking 4 to 5 subjects per trimester. But if you are working full time, like me, the process will definitely prolong because there is no way you are able to cope.

But I think completing the LPC may get you some exemptions here and there.

Hope this helps!
quote

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