application


elisa2
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fedefra
Hi elisa2,
you can find the application form for BeiDa on the website www.law.pku.edu.cn/llmp/En_05.asp
Then choose the red link.
If you have other problems, feel free to write me.
Do you want to go to Beijing Uni. to study chinese law next year? Me too but I have lots of doubts. Maybe can we talk about it?
Bye
Hi elisa2,
you can find the application form for BeiDa on the website www.law.pku.edu.cn/llmp/En_05.asp
Then choose the red link.
If you have other problems, feel free to write me.
Do you want to go to Beijing Uni. to study chinese law next year? Me too but I have lots of doubts. Maybe can we talk about it?
Bye
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elisa2
quote
fedefra
Hi elisa2,
I have lots of doubts because I heard some reputable italian (where I live) people that they advised against me a master in chinese law for some specific reasons:
1) It's only a flouring of chinese law
2) most important: if you don't learn chinese language, when you'll finish the course, you''ll find a job hardly because all the laws are in chinese and english is not suffcient as language to work.
So, before hearing this people I was very excited to go to learn chinese law but now I'm afraid that when I finish I can't work in/for the China.
Obviously these are only opinions, advises that they have given me.
And you, why do you want to study chinese law? Where do you live?
Forgive me, I didn't present myself: my name is Federico and I live in Modena, Italy
Hi elisa2,
I have lots of doubts because I heard some reputable italian (where I live) people that they advised against me a master in chinese law for some specific reasons:
1) It's only a flouring of chinese law
2) most important: if you don't learn chinese language, when you'll finish the course, you''ll find a job hardly because all the laws are in chinese and english is not suffcient as language to work.
So, before hearing this people I was very excited to go to learn chinese law but now I'm afraid that when I finish I can't work in/for the China.
Obviously these are only opinions, advises that they have given me.
And you, why do you want to study chinese law? Where do you live?
Forgive me, I didn't present myself: my name is Federico and I live in Modena, Italy
quote
elisa2

quote
elisa2
quote
fedefra
Hi elisa2,
you do well to study chinese law because you know chinese language and this is a huge advantage for your career!
Me, I don't know chinese and, even if I wanted to study, I take too much time to learn well.
Infact I thought at HKU me too especially CUHK (LLM in chinese business law) because the city is closer to the english language.
Or in these recent times I saw another interesting LLM in International Business law at NUS.During this master you study for 2 months at NUS and the rest of the year at ECUPL of Shanghai.. It seems perfect for me.
But if I was you, I'd go to BeiDa because it's the best university of China and the best place to get friendships for the career.
Hi elisa2,
you do well to study chinese law because you know chinese language and this is a huge advantage for your career!
Me, I don't know chinese and, even if I wanted to study, I take too much time to learn well.
Infact I thought at HKU me too especially CUHK (LLM in chinese business law) because the city is closer to the english language.
Or in these recent times I saw another interesting LLM in International Business law at NUS.During this master you study for 2 months at NUS and the rest of the year at ECUPL of Shanghai.. It seems perfect for me.
But if I was you, I'd go to BeiDa because it's the best university of China and the best place to get friendships for the career.
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elisa2
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Elisa -- please note that the site that fedefra pointed out to you is the English language LL.M. program. If you want to take the Chinese language LL.M. program in 北京大学, try this link: http://www.law.pku.edu.cn/

Fedefra -- the English language LL.M. program in Peking University is in the English language. :) However, Chinese law is passed in Chinese language. Translations are now available in English, but those translations are, as my professor mentioned, not official, and are written by academe and law firms, not by the government. So even if you take the LL.M. in Uni of HK (which, admittedly, might have professors who speak better English), you still run into the same problem when you need to practice Chinese law already. The option you mentioned, NUS LL.M. in International Business Law, doesn't really focus on Chinese law, but focuses on International Business Law courses. I do know that they have an elective on Chinese Company Law, but I don't know how extensive their elective offerings are on other Chinese law subjects.

Hope this helps, Elisa and Fedefra.
Elisa -- please note that the site that fedefra pointed out to you is the English language LL.M. program. If you want to take the Chinese language LL.M. program in 北京大学, try this link: http://www.law.pku.edu.cn/

Fedefra -- the English language LL.M. program in Peking University is in the English language. :) However, Chinese law is passed in Chinese language. Translations are now available in English, but those translations are, as my professor mentioned, not official, and are written by academe and law firms, not by the government. So even if you take the LL.M. in Uni of HK (which, admittedly, might have professors who speak better English), you still run into the same problem when you need to practice Chinese law already. The option you mentioned, NUS LL.M. in International Business Law, doesn't really focus on Chinese law, but focuses on International Business Law courses. I do know that they have an elective on Chinese Company Law, but I don't know how extensive their elective offerings are on other Chinese law subjects.

Hope this helps, Elisa and Fedefra.
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About jobs, I can't really say for sure, not having tested it yet myself. But from what I've seen, English speakers are usually able to find jobs in China. As I said, English translations of law are available, and chances are, you'll be advising foreign investors (who want to invest in China) using those translations. I suppose even the Chinese use them, in advising foreign investors. But knowing Chinese language will definitely be a huge plus.
About jobs, I can't really say for sure, not having tested it yet myself. But from what I've seen, English speakers are usually able to find jobs in China. As I said, English translations of law are available, and chances are, you'll be advising foreign investors (who want to invest in China) using those translations. I suppose even the Chinese use them, in advising foreign investors. But knowing Chinese language will definitely be a huge plus.
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elisa2
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elisa2
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fedefra
hi elisa2,
I've already a LLB and I agree with you that I must send several applications infact I decided to send my application to BeiDa too. Then if they will accept me, I'll decide.
I want to apply to a master far from Italy because I want to do this wonderful experience and because I hope it will increase my knowledge about laws even if I think I'm lucky to live here.
hi elisa2,
I've already a LLB and I agree with you that I must send several applications infact I decided to send my application to BeiDa too. Then if they will accept me, I'll decide.
I want to apply to a master far from Italy because I want to do this wonderful experience and because I hope it will increase my knowledge about laws even if I think I'm lucky to live here.
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elisa2
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confused1
Hi Guys,

I was accepted into the Spring 2008 class for the Tsinghua LLM program starting in Feb as an exchange student. I am from Australia and don't have much idea of how good the program is, its reputation (considered by local, HK and also Western standards), and what the courses are exactly like. Also I'm not sure how it stacks up to Beida's program. Can someone please provide some clarity around this? Would appreciate any and all of your insights as I am one confused person!

Sorry if you noticed this post in multiple topics since I wasn't sure which one people look at the most.


Cheers
Hi Guys,

I was accepted into the Spring 2008 class for the Tsinghua LLM program starting in Feb as an exchange student. I am from Australia and don't have much idea of how good the program is, its reputation (considered by local, HK and also Western standards), and what the courses are exactly like. Also I'm not sure how it stacks up to Beida's program. Can someone please provide some clarity around this? Would appreciate any and all of your insights as I am one confused person!

Sorry if you noticed this post in multiple topics since I wasn't sure which one people look at the most.


Cheers
quote

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