Average Grades from top 100 Law School


Given the wealth of information I've found on this board so far, I couldn't help but ask for advice regarding LLM programs in the US. I'm thinking of taking a year off from the firm I'm currently with and seeking a "general" LLM degree from a top 50 school. My major stumbling block is my JD grades. I ended up graduating in the bottom 50% of my class (my law school is ranked just inside top 100), but was on Law Review and another of the school's academic journals. I feel my grades slipped due to law review and other outside committments during 2L and 3L years. With that said, I do have a few book awards to my credit. Additionally, I've worked for a federal judge, and have pretty solid work experience for the last 3 years with a 400 attorney law firm - practicing heavily in federal court.

I've always had a goal of receiving a degree from a top school and have decided to send out applications, just to give it a shot. I understand that I'm not going to be applying to the Harvards, Yales, etc; however, I'd love to have a shot at a school such as Georgetown, Duke, Boston, Northwestern, etc.

Based on my academic and work experience, should I bother giving it a shot? I know top schools can draw lines in the sand regarding class rank. Should I give up the dream of a top 50 school and shoot for something more reasonable? Any one out there in a similar situation with a success story?

Any help would be great.

Given the wealth of information I've found on this board so far, I couldn't help but ask for advice regarding LLM programs in the US. I'm thinking of taking a year off from the firm I'm currently with and seeking a "general" LLM degree from a top 50 school. My major stumbling block is my JD grades. I ended up graduating in the bottom 50% of my class (my law school is ranked just inside top 100), but was on Law Review and another of the school's academic journals. I feel my grades slipped due to law review and other outside committments during 2L and 3L years. With that said, I do have a few book awards to my credit. Additionally, I've worked for a federal judge, and have pretty solid work experience for the last 3 years with a 400 attorney law firm - practicing heavily in federal court.

I've always had a goal of receiving a degree from a top school and have decided to send out applications, just to give it a shot. I understand that I'm not going to be applying to the Harvards, Yales, etc; however, I'd love to have a shot at a school such as Georgetown, Duke, Boston, Northwestern, etc.

Based on my academic and work experience, should I bother giving it a shot? I know top schools can draw lines in the sand regarding class rank. Should I give up the dream of a top 50 school and shoot for something more reasonable? Any one out there in a similar situation with a success story?

Any help would be great.

quote

I'd also consider University of Georgia, Colorado-Boulder, and George Washington.

I'd also consider University of Georgia, Colorado-Boulder, and George Washington.
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P_Martini

Unless it is a tax LL.M. or unless the objective is to teach someday, most U.S. graduates go overseas. A domestic LL.M., I have to think, is much less common.

Unless it is a tax LL.M. or unless the objective is to teach someday, most U.S. graduates go overseas. A domestic LL.M., I have to think, is much less common.
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Engineer

pjh,

I think you'd have a decent shot at a top 50 school. I got into schools ranked much more highly than I would have anticipated; I think some schools treat the LLM as a cash cow. However, I also think you should take a hard look at why you want to do it. Assuming you are making a decent salary at a pretty big firm, you are going to get little to no financial aid and will end up incurring some serious debt. So in my opinion, you need a better reason than just taking a year off from the firm.

All the best to you.

pjh,

I think you'd have a decent shot at a top 50 school. I got into schools ranked much more highly than I would have anticipated; I think some schools treat the LLM as a cash cow. However, I also think you should take a hard look at why you want to do it. Assuming you are making a decent salary at a pretty big firm, you are going to get little to no financial aid and will end up incurring some serious debt. So in my opinion, you need a better reason than just taking a year off from the firm.

All the best to you.
quote

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