Application eligibility


anon27
Hey guys,

I'm planning on applying for LLM in USA for the 2019 intake.
I have 2 years of work experience with a law firm and that would be 3 years by the 2019 semester starts, and I have also done a short term internship as a judicial clerk.
I intend to obtain a waiver for English proficiency.

I did not graduate amongst the top of my class, and wanted to know if there are any cut-offs with respect to LLB grades.
I am aware the a lot of university websites say there aren't cut-offs but practically, what are the odds of someone with average grades obtaining LLM admissions?
Hey guys,

I'm planning on applying for LLM in USA for the 2019 intake.
I have 2 years of work experience with a law firm and that would be 3 years by the 2019 semester starts, and I have also done a short term internship as a judicial clerk.
I intend to obtain a waiver for English proficiency.

I did not graduate amongst the top of my class, and wanted to know if there are any cut-offs with respect to LLB grades.
I am aware the a lot of university websites say there aren't cut-offs but practically, what are the odds of someone with average grades obtaining LLM admissions?
quote
Yuan Li
Hi! This a great question!
If your LL.B. grades are not mostly in the 3.0 range or above, then you should probably apply to schools that are more likely to consider your work and/or other experience. Like ours, many law schools review applications holistically as a complete package. Ultimately, most schools are looking for candidates who have the ability to succeed in their LL.M. Programs. Indicators of this ability can be found in your academic record, test scores, reference letters, work experience, community service and personal characteristics. The law school that you eventually choose will be a personal choice but you should consider whether you will be able to not just survive, but thrive at that law school.

For full disclosure, I work in LL.M. & M.S.L. Programs at Dayton Law.
Hi! This a great question!
If your LL.B. grades are not mostly in the 3.0 range or above, then you should probably apply to schools that are more likely to consider your work and/or other experience. Like ours, many law schools review applications holistically as a complete package. Ultimately, most schools are looking for candidates who have the ability to succeed in their LL.M. Programs. Indicators of this ability can be found in your academic record, test scores, reference letters, work experience, community service and personal characteristics. The law school that you eventually choose will be a personal choice but you should consider whether you will be able to not just survive, but thrive at that law school.

For full disclosure, I work in LL.M. & M.S.L. Programs at Dayton Law.
quote

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