American LLM Programs


Arnauld C.
It is hard to get information on the size of the American LLM programs. I know that some are really small compared the European programs such as University of London with almost 1000 students in all colleges (which is rather too big in my view). Some American Websites say that the programs are limited to XY students but most don't.

My point is: I do not want to end up in a mimi program which is primarily designed to make some extra money with the JD course offered. So I would really like to know if there are special LLM programs which are not too small and have special courses for the LLM students or at least some special activities. Otherwise, 30 000 USD is hard to justify for a one-year program, I think...

Could anyone post his or her views or information about this issue? Thanks!
It is hard to get information on the size of the American LLM programs. I know that some are really small compared the European programs such as University of London with almost 1000 students in all colleges (which is rather too big in my view). Some American Websites say that the programs are limited to XY students but most don't.

My point is: I do not want to end up in a mimi program which is primarily designed to make some extra money with the JD course offered. So I would really like to know if there are special LLM programs which are not too small and have special courses for the LLM students or at least some special activities. Otherwise, 30 000 USD is hard to justify for a one-year program, I think...

Could anyone post his or her views or information about this issue? Thanks!
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George
Hi Arnauld
I heard that NYU has very many LLM students, something like several hundreds but I dont know the exact figures, also George Washington is taking in quite a few, but I just know from heresay.
Hi Arnauld
I heard that NYU has very many LLM students, something like several hundreds but I dont know the exact figures, also George Washington is taking in quite a few, but I just know from heresay.
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Arnauld C.
I might specialize in Taxation, so NYU would surely be an option. Have you heard anything about University of Chicago Law School or Tulane?
I might specialize in Taxation, so NYU would surely be an option. Have you heard anything about University of Chicago Law School or Tulane?
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Nikolas
NYU has the best U.S. News rating in Tax Law:

1. New York University
2. University of Florida (Levin)
3. Georgetown University (DC)

Chicago is ranked in 6. place for its general law programs. Tulane is only in 56. place. However, I am not sure whether these rankings are any good for choosing the right LLM program at all. I would also consider the most interesting location what kind of people take part in the LLM.
NYU has the best U.S. News rating in Tax Law:

1. New York University
2. University of Florida (Levin)
3. Georgetown University (DC)

Chicago is ranked in 6. place for its general law programs. Tulane is only in 56. place. However, I am not sure whether these rankings are any good for choosing the right LLM program at all. I would also consider the most interesting location what kind of people take part in the LLM.
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Arnauld C.
University of Chicago Law School offers two degree programs: Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Master of Comparative Law (M.Comp.L.). Do you know the difference?
University of Chicago Law School offers two degree programs: Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Master of Comparative Law (M.Comp.L.). Do you know the difference?
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Casia
What do you think are the most interesting and international cities in the USA? Of course New York, but are there others cities which can be compared?
What do you think are the most interesting and international cities in the USA? Of course New York, but are there others cities which can be compared?
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Nikolas
Well, that depends on what kind of cities you llike. If you are European (as I assume) you will probably like San Francisco (LLM at Boalt Hall, Berkeley) and New Orleans. Los Angeles is a typical American city wiht miles of flat houses and some skyscrapers in the banking center. Chicago is in some ways similar but has great architecture. I don't know Washington DC and Boston. I guess New York City and San Francisco are my favourites and the most international cities. But Boston and the East Coast are probably interesting as well. If you are used to living on the countryside, the midwest red states could also be something for you....
Well, that depends on what kind of cities you llike. If you are European (as I assume) you will probably like San Francisco (LLM at Boalt Hall, Berkeley) and New Orleans. Los Angeles is a typical American city wiht miles of flat houses and some skyscrapers in the banking center. Chicago is in some ways similar but has great architecture. I don't know Washington DC and Boston. I guess New York City and San Francisco are my favourites and the most international cities. But Boston and the East Coast are probably interesting as well. If you are used to living on the countryside, the midwest red states could also be something for you....
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Casia
No, I would also rather study in New York but first I have to talk with my bank (my parents, my employer...). There are some EU scholarships here but they are usually for UK or other European countries, but the LLM from the USA is more prestigeous for the law firms.
No, I would also rather study in New York but first I have to talk with my bank (my parents, my employer...). There are some EU scholarships here but they are usually for UK or other European countries, but the LLM from the USA is more prestigeous for the law firms.
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Nikolas
I don't know about this, but I always wanted to study in the states for a while.
<a href="http://www.llm-guide.com/board/288"></a>
I don't know about this, but I always wanted to study in the states for a while.
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Nikolas
http://www.llm-guide.com/board/288 ...People get enthusiastic about the UK US thing ;-)
http://www.llm-guide.com/board/288 ...People get enthusiastic about the UK US thing ;-)
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OliverP
Arnauld,

a mini program is not so bad when doing a specialized LLM (e.g. NYU's taxation program, which indeed is one of the best).
If you want to do a more general LLM, Columbia is probably a better choice than NYU, as the program is a bit smaller and seems better organized. I did an LLM in New York myself and know people from both schools. If you plan to work in Europe afterwards, either school is really good for your resume, though.
As for smaller programs, if you go to a first tier school with a well-planned LLM program in your area of interest, you will do fine.
If you take a "general" LLM, i.e. not the NYU taxation LLM, you should consider taking the bar exam after the program. Make sure that you're able to take at least some JD classes (corporations or the like). LLM schools with specialized programs for international students only don't do so good when taking the bar exam. And consider that even though your English is really good, other foreign students might not be on your level... you'll most probably learn more in classes that are not exclusively for international LLM students.
By the way, University of Chicago has a fantastic program, very exclusive but the campus is very much in the "woods" . I heard it's not that easy to go to town from the campus (and anyway, even though Chicago is nice, New York is not so bad either).

Good luck,

Oliver
Arnauld,

a mini program is not so bad when doing a specialized LLM (e.g. NYU's taxation program, which indeed is one of the best).
If you want to do a more general LLM, Columbia is probably a better choice than NYU, as the program is a bit smaller and seems better organized. I did an LLM in New York myself and know people from both schools. If you plan to work in Europe afterwards, either school is really good for your resume, though.
As for smaller programs, if you go to a first tier school with a well-planned LLM program in your area of interest, you will do fine.
If you take a "general" LLM, i.e. not the NYU taxation LLM, you should consider taking the bar exam after the program. Make sure that you're able to take at least some JD classes (corporations or the like). LLM schools with specialized programs for international students only don't do so good when taking the bar exam. And consider that even though your English is really good, other foreign students might not be on your level... you'll most probably learn more in classes that are not exclusively for international LLM students.
By the way, University of Chicago has a fantastic program, very exclusive but the campus is very much in the "woods" . I heard it's not that easy to go to town from the campus (and anyway, even though Chicago is nice, New York is not so bad either).

Good luck,

Oliver
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Arnauld C.
As for smaller programs, if you go to a first tier school with a well-planned LLM program in your area of interest, you will do fine.
If you take a "general" LLM, i.e. not the NYU taxation LLM, you should consider taking the bar exam after the program. Make sure that you're able to take at least some JD classes (corporations or the like). LLM schools with specialized programs for international students only don't do so good when taking the bar exam.


Oliver, you make an interesting point, I have not looked at it from this aspect. As I want to take the bar exam, it may really be a good idea to take some J.D. classes in order to study not only with other foreign students, but also with American lawyers. University of Chicago is on my watch list. A friend of mine did his LLM there and really enjoyed the year.
<blockquote>As for smaller programs, if you go to a first tier school with a well-planned LLM program in your area of interest, you will do fine.
If you take a "general" LLM, i.e. not the NYU taxation LLM, you should consider taking the bar exam after the program. Make sure that you're able to take at least some JD classes (corporations or the like). LLM schools with specialized programs for international students only don't do so good when taking the bar exam.</blockquote>

Oliver, you make an interesting point, I have not looked at it from this aspect. As I want to take the bar exam, it may really be a good idea to take some J.D. classes in order to study not only with other foreign students, but also with American lawyers. University of Chicago is on my watch list. A friend of mine did his LLM there and really enjoyed the year.
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Casia
Hey Arnauld, are your preparations for the LLM going? I did some research for scholarships, but many of them are for European universities or at least they do not cover the whole fee of the programs in the USA...
Hey Arnauld, are your preparations for the LLM going? I did some research for scholarships, but many of them are for European universities or at least they do not cover the whole fee of the programs in the USA...
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Iowa
The U of Chicago has an excellent program (especially if you're into Law & Economics), and it is not that hard to get downtown from campus. But I come from a part of Midwest with very little public transportation, so my definition of easy might be a little different than yours.
Chicago is one of the nicer cities in the USA. The people are friendlier than in NY or Boston, and there's nothing like being down at the lake in summer.
The U of Chicago has an excellent program (especially if you're into Law & Economics), and it is not that hard to get downtown from campus. But I come from a part of Midwest with very little public transportation, so my definition of easy might be a little different than yours.
Chicago is one of the nicer cities in the USA. The people are friendlier than in NY or Boston, and there's nothing like being down at the lake in summer.
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