ARE BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LAW and LLB same


safkool
please ansere me this question here or saf_naim05@hotmail.com. Pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
please ansere me this question here or saf_naim05@hotmail.com. Pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
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bardiva
As far as I know, there is no way on earth that Bachelor of Arts( B.A) could possibly be the same as a Bachelor of Laws(LL.B). It's possible to do a combined degree BA LLB.
But I've never heard of them being the same.
Perhaps it differs from Country to Country. But that would be a first for me.
As far as I know, there is no way on earth that Bachelor of Arts( B.A) could possibly be the same as a Bachelor of Laws(LL.B). It's possible to do a combined degree BA LLB.
But I've never heard of them being the same.
Perhaps it differs from Country to Country. But that would be a first for me.
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lops
Actually - Oxford's 'LLB' is called a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence - it is the only university that uses this name for its "LLB" - generally all other universities call it the LLB. So in the case of Oxford - yes a Bachelor of Arts is the LLB. But not so for other universities - as far as I'm aware, no other universities have a BA thats actually an LLB.
Actually - Oxford's 'LLB' is called a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence - it is the only university that uses this name for its "LLB" - generally all other universities call it the LLB. So in the case of Oxford - yes a Bachelor of Arts is the LLB. But not so for other universities - as far as I'm aware, no other universities have a BA thats actually an LLB.
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safkool
So if I complete that degree from Oxford...........what award will i be given- BA or LLB?
So if I complete that degree from Oxford...........what award will i be given- BA or LLB?
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bardiva
Thanks lops!

Actually - Oxford's 'LLB' is called a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence - it is the only university that uses this name for its "LLB" - generally all other universities call it the LLB. So in the case of Oxford - yes a Bachelor of Arts is the LLB. But not so for other universities - as far as I'm aware, no other universities have a BA thats actually an LLB.
Thanks lops!

<blockquote>Actually - Oxford's 'LLB' is called a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence - it is the only university that uses this name for its "LLB" - generally all other universities call it the LLB. So in the case of Oxford - yes a Bachelor of Arts is the LLB. But not so for other universities - as far as I'm aware, no other universities have a BA thats actually an LLB.</blockquote>
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Mats
Oxford is not the only university to award a B.A. instead of an LL.B. It's the same at Cambridge: You don't get an LL.B., but a "B.A. in Law" (in fact, every Oxbridge undergraduate gets a B.A. as his/her first degree, even the scientists).
Oxford is not the only university to award a B.A. instead of an LL.B. It's the same at Cambridge: You don't get an LL.B., but a "B.A. in Law" (in fact, every Oxbridge undergraduate gets a B.A. as his/her first degree, even the scientists).
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The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..
The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..
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mishieru07
The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..


I'm not sure this is right. As far as I know, the BA Law students from Oxford and Cambridge are treated like any other LLB student. They most certainly are allowed to practise law, either as a solicitor or as a barrister (pending the relevant vocational qualifications, obviously).
<blockquote>The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..</blockquote>

I'm not sure this is right. As far as I know, the BA Law students from Oxford and Cambridge are treated like any other LLB student. They most certainly are allowed to practise law, either as a solicitor or as a barrister (pending the relevant vocational qualifications, obviously).
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mishieru07
So if I complete that degree from Oxford...........what award will i be given- BA or LLB?


You'll get a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence.
<blockquote>So if I complete that degree from Oxford...........what award will i be given- BA or LLB?</blockquote>

You'll get a Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence.
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law01
The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..


It would be appropriate to clarify couple of things so that people are not misled by your comment. First of all a BA from Oxbridge as the same as an LLB, they are both fully accredited legal degrees. The difference in name is only a matter of tradition and nothing else. The BA DOES NOT in any way prevent your from practicing (providing you pass the relevan course, BPTC or LPC), and in fact Barrister Chambers and Law Firms, especially the Civil Law ones prefer, or even want, oxbridge graduates, whether they have completed a BA + BPTC OR some other degre + GDL + BPTC! Please don't consider this as an attack to what you said, I am just trying to set thing right and prevent people thinking that a BA eg from Oxbridge will not allow them to become barristers or solicitors, because the answer to this is the complete opposite to what you have suggested :)
<blockquote>The two provide almost the same, in "B.A. in Law" it is obvious one will read all books and shall have unlimited access to materials and books applied in LL.B, and basically the two learn one and the same thing,and are all legal minds, they only differ in what one can do in a career with the choice of degree as made between either LL.B and B.A. in Law. One who intends to practice law can prudently take LL.B and those who do not have interest in practicing law take the other. Perhaps, it is because those who take LL.B with much adoration and self centered approach view "B.A in Law" as act of "encroachment" and that those in B.A in Law should be belittled and less honoured or unrecognized, however, knowledge of the law is not a preserve for LL.B holder, neither is knowledge of law a perquisite of LL.B holder. It is a fact that the two are not the same only on grounds of allowance into professional practice of law, which B.A in Law may be coveting....The two degrees are liberal arts and not science, they are birds of the same plumage..</blockquote>

It would be appropriate to clarify couple of things so that people are not misled by your comment. First of all a BA from Oxbridge as the same as an LLB, they are both fully accredited legal degrees. The difference in name is only a matter of tradition and nothing else. The BA DOES NOT in any way prevent your from practicing (providing you pass the relevan course, BPTC or LPC), and in fact Barrister Chambers and Law Firms, especially the Civil Law ones prefer, or even want, oxbridge graduates, whether they have completed a BA + BPTC OR some other degre + GDL + BPTC! Please don't consider this as an attack to what you said, I am just trying to set thing right and prevent people thinking that a BA eg from Oxbridge will not allow them to become barristers or solicitors, because the answer to this is the complete opposite to what you have suggested :)

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Thank for your guided comment,but you will certainly notice that I firmly hold the LLB and BA law degrees are the same, and sorry for that confusion in all my observations and views sampled from certain jurisdictions. I hold your views with a very liberal mind and with a philosophical approach in that every tiger must jealously and viciously protect its territorials, and a wise man ever looks with care the buttered side if his bread. I knew that a fact like one raised by you would definitely arise, but that was only a view from a sampled jurisdiction, kindly do carefully revisit my last sentence, I want to say, it is all the same but variation are in terms and conditions for practicing law when holding either degree.This discussion will be an eye opener to many if the central idea and the correct answer sought by the question now is demanding whether one can practice law with either LLB or BA Law degree and not what they entail after training. You will agree with me conditions for admissions to the bar and practicing licence requirements/award varies from one jurisdiction to another.Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US. BA law are rare in US and popular in others. In UK both LLB and BA law can be barristers/solicitors. In UK, India, South Africa and many jurisdictions in Africa and Commonwealth the same but subject to variations. But In some jurisdiction the question is not holding a law degree but what subjects they consider as compulsory for admission to the Bar did you study..eg In Kenya whether you have JD,LLB or BA law the jurisdiction has it that 16 core subjects must be in the transcript, but UK matters are different. Kindly note, I never knew that all was about supporting a BA from Oxbridge,an institution I have much reverence as a BA holder, and in that case then have my full support. YES you can be a barrister.
Thank for your guided comment,but you will certainly notice that I firmly hold the LLB and BA law degrees are the same, and sorry for that confusion in all my observations and views sampled from certain jurisdictions. I hold your views with a very liberal mind and with a philosophical approach in that every tiger must jealously and viciously protect its territorials, and a wise man ever looks with care the buttered side if his bread. I knew that a fact like one raised by you would definitely arise, but that was only a view from a sampled jurisdiction, kindly do carefully revisit my last sentence, I want to say, it is all the same but variation are in terms and conditions for practicing law when holding either degree.This discussion will be an eye opener to many if the central idea and the correct answer sought by the question now is demanding whether one can practice law with either LLB or BA Law degree and not what they entail after training. You will agree with me conditions for admissions to the bar and practicing licence requirements/award varies from one jurisdiction to another.Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US. BA law are rare in US and popular in others. In UK both LLB and BA law can be barristers/solicitors. In UK, India, South Africa and many jurisdictions in Africa and Commonwealth the same but subject to variations. But In some jurisdiction the question is not holding a law degree but what subjects they consider as compulsory for admission to the Bar did you study..eg In Kenya whether you have JD,LLB or BA law the jurisdiction has it that 16 core subjects must be in the transcript, but UK matters are different. Kindly note, I never knew that all was about supporting a BA from Oxbridge,an institution I have much reverence as a BA holder, and in that case then have my full support. YES you can be a barrister.
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mishieru07
Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US.


I think it's very much state dependent, but you're probably right that most people won't be allowed to qualify with just a BA/ LLB. The exception is NY Bar, where I'm fairly sure you can take the exam after a BA/ LLB.

That said, Oxbridge aside, not all BA Law programmes in the UK are actually considered qualifying degrees; the UK, like Kenya, requires students to fulfill certain core subject requirements. OP, if you're looking to work in the UK, you should check with the SRA to make sure you get a qualifying law degree either way: http://www.sra.org.uk/students/courses/qualifying-law-degree-providers.page
<blockquote>Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US. </blockquote>

I think it's very much state dependent, but you're probably right that most people won't be allowed to qualify with just a BA/ LLB. The exception is NY Bar, where I'm fairly sure you can take the exam after a BA/ LLB.

That said, Oxbridge aside, not all BA Law programmes in the UK are actually considered qualifying degrees; the UK, like Kenya, requires students to fulfill certain core subject requirements. OP, if you're looking to work in the UK, you should check with the SRA to make sure you get a qualifying law degree either way: http://www.sra.org.uk/students/courses/qualifying-law-degree-providers.page
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law01
Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US.


I think it's very much state dependent, but you're probably right that most people won't be allowed to qualify with just a BA/ LLB. The exception is NY Bar, where I'm fairly sure you can take the exam after a BA/ LLB.

That said, Oxbridge aside, not all BA Law programmes in the UK are actually considered qualifying degrees; the UK, like Kenya, requires students to fulfill certain core subject requirements. OP, if you're looking to work in the UK, you should check with the SRA to make sure you get a qualifying law degree either way: http://www.sra.org.uk/students/courses/qualifying-law-degree-providers.page


From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree
<blockquote><blockquote>Though JD, LL.B and BA Law are all first degrees in law one with LL.B and BA Law cannot practice law in US without attaining JD status after another +3 (xxx +3 = JD) and do not be surprised to find a BA law and LLB holder working in the same level as paralegal in US. </blockquote>

I think it's very much state dependent, but you're probably right that most people won't be allowed to qualify with just a BA/ LLB. The exception is NY Bar, where I'm fairly sure you can take the exam after a BA/ LLB.

That said, Oxbridge aside, not all BA Law programmes in the UK are actually considered qualifying degrees; the UK, like Kenya, requires students to fulfill certain core subject requirements. OP, if you're looking to work in the UK, you should check with the SRA to make sure you get a qualifying law degree either way: http://www.sra.org.uk/students/courses/qualifying-law-degree-providers.page</blockquote>

From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree
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Mark W

From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree


Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.
<blockquote>
From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree</blockquote>

Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.
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law01

From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree


Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.


I was not aware that other Universities offered a BA, thanks about this Mark :) I am unsure about Cambridge, but I know for sure that the Oxford BA is a qualifying paw degree as many of my BPTC classmates are Oxford BA in Jurisprudence graduates
<blockquote><blockquote>
From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree</blockquote>

Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.</blockquote>

I was not aware that other Universities offered a BA, thanks about this Mark :) I am unsure about Cambridge, but I know for sure that the Oxford BA is a qualifying paw degree as many of my BPTC classmates are Oxford BA in Jurisprudence graduates
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From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree


Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.
<blockquote><blockquote>
From what I know there is no other university offering a BA instead of an LLB. I am only talking about the UK as the thread was opened in the United Kingdom forum!! Furthermore, almost all if not all law degree offered in the UK satisfy the criteria and are considered as law degrees. Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree</blockquote>

Nottingham offer a BA in Law as well as an LLB. They have set out things in a very unclear way but it seems to me that both are qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer a BA in Law to students who don't meet the entry requirements, or who fail some aspect of, their LLB degree. These tend to be lower ranked universities. Some, but not all, of those BAs are not qualifying law degrees.

There are a few universities that offer LLBs where the student studies 'only law', but BAs where the student takes a combined program in 'Law with Underwater Basket Weaving', for example. I suppose it makes more sense to call those BAs than LLBs. Most of those 'mixed' BAs are qualifying, or at least, qualifying if the student makes the appropriate choices.

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.</blockquote>
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Wonderful, I will be most grateful to know more about the degree you refer to when saying "Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree" please lend me a hand here. It a coincidence just after posting I came to learn also that for sure that in the US specifically New York state jurisdiction both BA law, LLB can be admitted to bar what a fascinating development.
Wonderful, I will be most grateful to know more about the degree you refer to when saying "Even the GDL which is a one year law degree is a qualifying law degree" please lend me a hand here. It a coincidence just after posting I came to learn also that for sure that in the US specifically New York state jurisdiction both BA law, LLB can be admitted to bar what a fascinating development.
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mishieru07

Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.


You're right about Cambridge - in theory, you could opt not to take some of the required subjects. Oxford's law degree is qualifying by default since all students have to take the core subjects (EU, Trusts, Admin, Constitutional, Land, Tort, Contract, Criminal)
<blockquote>
Going back to an earlier point, I have a feeling that the Cambridge BA in Law is not 'automatically' a qualifying law degree. That is, it is open to students on the course to choose modules such that they don't end up with a qualifying law degree. The only ones that are compulsory at Cambridge are Tort, Criminal, and Con & Ad, though no doubt they very strongly encourage everyone to take the other four. That's my understanding of http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/tripos-choice-of-subjects.php, anyway. Not sure whether that is the case at Oxford.</blockquote>

You're right about Cambridge - in theory, you could opt not to take some of the required subjects. Oxford's law degree is qualifying by default since all students have to take the core subjects (EU, Trusts, Admin, Constitutional, Land, Tort, Contract, Criminal)
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