LLM- Germany or Netherlands?


Hello!

In 2022 term, I’m planning to do LLM in business or corporate law in Europe or UK. I’m from India (non-EU) and my priority is to stay in Europe after LLM, even without a traditional law job. I think it is harder if I go to UK, so I am struggling to decide between Germany and Netherlands. I have A2 German language skills and I am willing to learn advanced German in order to get work opportunities.

My considerations are as follows:

1. I can go to German programs (ILF or Bucerius) which have lower reputations but I can learn advanced German and try to stay in Germany following LLM. I think chances to stay in Europe are higher if I choose German programs (that is what I have been told by a few Non-EU alumni from the German universities).

2- I can go to Netherland and study at Leiden or University of Amsterdam which definitely has better reputation and I can still try to find jobs after LLM to stay in Europe but I don't know if staying and finding work in Netherlands is easier than Germany.

3- I am not even considering UK since getting work after LLM there is way too difficult.

4- I do not wish to do my LLM or work in US/Canada.

So I am in a fix whether to go to a school in Germany or Netherlands.
My main priority is- working in that country after the LLM. The job doesn't have to be traditional law, I am open to working with companies and startups, etc.
Provided law does not work out for me, I am willing to work in another area just to stay in the country after LLM.

Germany or Netherlands?

I’d really appreciate your comments/advice. Thank you so much in advance!

Hello!

In 2022 term, I’m planning to do LLM in business or corporate law in Europe or UK. I’m from India (non-EU) and my priority is to stay in Europe after LLM, even without a traditional law job. I think it is harder if I go to UK, so I am struggling to decide between Germany and Netherlands. I have A2 German language skills and I am willing to learn advanced German in order to get work opportunities.

My considerations are as follows:

1. I can go to German programs (ILF or Bucerius) which have lower reputations but I can learn advanced German and try to stay in Germany following LLM. I think chances to stay in Europe are higher if I choose German programs (that is what I have been told by a few Non-EU alumni from the German universities).

2- I can go to Netherland and study at Leiden or University of Amsterdam which definitely has better reputation and I can still try to find jobs after LLM to stay in Europe but I don't know if staying and finding work in Netherlands is easier than Germany.

3- I am not even considering UK since getting work after LLM there is way too difficult.

4- I do not wish to do my LLM or work in US/Canada.

So I am in a fix whether to go to a school in Germany or Netherlands.
My main priority is- working in that country after the LLM. The job doesn't have to be traditional law, I am open to working with companies and startups, etc.
Provided law does not work out for me, I am willing to work in another area just to stay in the country after LLM.

Germany or Netherlands?

I’d really appreciate your comments/advice. Thank you so much in advance!
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Shremeh

Hi Mona, pl. let me know if you were able to decide. I am in a similar condition. Thx.

Hi Mona, pl. let me know if you were able to decide. I am in a similar condition. Thx.
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Mnjr

I am also in a similar situation. I spoke to an EU citizen who works as a legal counsel in an MNC and they mentioned just like you said how taking the course in German paves way for more opportunities than taking the English course. However, he mentioned that it is not easy to cause to be qualified as a proper lawyer, we'd have to pass the State exams which are waaay tougher than our traditional AIBE (and take longer too). He suggests looking at the jobs being posted online in the field that we want to and then make a decision. For example, I am interested in Corporate and IP law and I've come to see that Staatsexamen is, unfortunately, a pre-requisite for most of the jobs. The only bet is to build contacts in the 1 year of college and apply to startups/smaller companies and firms that do not exclusively need licenced lawyers. 
Since even you want to stay in the EU after LLM, look at TU - Dresden and Hannover's two semester two different places courses. They have partnered up with universities over Europe for a semester exchange. Perhaps that can increase our exposure. (Do note that LLM degree will come only from the parent university.) 

I am also in a similar situation. I spoke to an EU citizen who works as a legal counsel in an MNC and they mentioned just like you said how taking the course in German paves way for more opportunities than taking the English course. However, he mentioned that it is not easy to cause to be qualified as a proper lawyer, we'd have to pass the State exams which are waaay tougher than our traditional AIBE (and take longer too). He suggests looking at the jobs being posted online in the field that we want to and then make a decision. For example, I am interested in Corporate and IP law and I've come to see that Staatsexamen is, unfortunately, a pre-requisite for most of the jobs. The only bet is to build contacts in the 1 year of college and apply to startups/smaller companies and firms that do not exclusively need licenced lawyers.&nbsp;<br>Since even you want to stay in the EU after LLM, look at TU - Dresden and Hannover's two semester two different places courses. They have partnered up with universities over Europe for a semester exchange. Perhaps that can increase our exposure. (Do note that LLM degree will come only from the parent university.)&nbsp;
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p

Hi, I was in your shoe last year but I decided to stay in my country due to the pandemic and my current employment. I would like to give you some answers and hopefully, it is helpful.


1. I can go to German programs (ILF or Bucerius) which have lower reputations but I can learn advanced German and try to stay in Germany following LLM. I think chances to stay in Europe are higher if I choose German programs (that is what I have been told by a few Non-EU alumni from the German universities).
First of all, universities in Germany are at the same tier and it is difficult to distinguishes the quality since Germany holds the State Exam. Thus, every universities are almost the same unless some professors are renowned in your interested legal fields. English LL.M. is opened for Foreign students. Regarding some former students I know, they told me that they rarely saw German students in English LL.M. However, some students is competent to secure their jobs, as a paralegal, in Germany. I'd recommend that if you want to work in Germany, please try to take a specialized program such as IP-IT law or may be Competition law for instance. It depends on your networking and which cities you study. If you study some places that they frequently hold events, you will have chances to network and make connections. Yet, if you know German, that will definitely help you finding jobs. (Better make it higher than B2++)


2- I can go to Netherland and study at Leiden or University of Amsterdam which definitely has better reputation and I can still try to find jobs after LLM to stay in Europe but I don't know if staying and finding work in Netherlands is easier than Germany.

Netherland is also a good place to find jobs as well. On top of that, there are more English program than German universities. I'd recommend you to go to the Netherlands instead of Germany. The process of finding jobs will show up after you are there and make connections during your study. As said, you should take some specialization degree. 

3- I am not even considering UK since getting work after LLM there is way too difficult.To be honest, UK's competition is tough. If your main goal is looking for jobs, it is better to go to some countries instead. Please note that UK's market is also one of the largest hub of law firms as well. Although, EU seems to be easier to find jobs due to the competition level, there are more seats, lets say, more law firms in UK. It's the cost and benefit for all opportunities. 

4- I do not wish to do my LLM or work in US/Canada.Noted, Those countries study's expense are twice of UK and EU's study budget. 


Germany or Netherlands?Last words, look up for your expertise first, if you are IT-IP guy, Germany is interesting. 

Hi, I was in your shoe last year but I decided to stay in my country due to the pandemic and my current employment. I would like to give you some answers and hopefully, it is helpful.<br><br><br><div>1. I can go to German programs (ILF or Bucerius) which have lower reputations but I can learn advanced German and try to stay in Germany following LLM. I think chances to stay in Europe are higher if I choose German programs (that is what I have been told by a few Non-EU alumni from the German universities).</div><br>First of all, universities in Germany are at the same tier and it is difficult to distinguishes the quality since Germany holds the State Exam. Thus, every universities are almost the same unless some professors are renowned in your interested legal fields. English LL.M. is opened for Foreign students. Regarding some former students I know, they told me that they rarely saw German students in English LL.M. However, some students is competent to secure their jobs, as a paralegal, in Germany. I'd recommend that if you want to work in Germany, please try to take a specialized program such as IP-IT law or may be Competition law for instance. It depends on your networking and which cities you study. If you study some places that they frequently hold events, you will have chances to network and make connections. Yet, if you know German, that will definitely help you finding jobs. (Better make it higher than B2++)<br><br><br><div>2- I can go to Netherland and study at Leiden or University of Amsterdam which definitely has better reputation and I can still try to find jobs after LLM to stay in Europe but I don't know if staying and finding work in Netherlands is easier than Germany.</div><br><br>Netherland is also a good place to find jobs as well. On top of that, there are more English program than German universities. I'd recommend you to go to the Netherlands instead of Germany. The process of finding jobs will show up after you are there and make connections during your study. As said, you should take some specialization degree.&nbsp;<br><br><div>3- I am not even considering UK since getting work after LLM there is way too difficult.</div>To be honest, UK's competition is tough. If your main goal is looking for jobs, it is better to go to some countries instead. Please note that UK's market is also one of the largest hub of law firms as well. Although, EU seems to be easier to find jobs due to the competition level, there are more seats, lets say, more law firms in UK. It's the cost and benefit for all opportunities.&nbsp;<br><br><div>4- I do not wish to do my LLM or work in US/Canada.</div>Noted, Those countries study's expense are twice of UK and EU's study budget.&nbsp;<br><br><div><br></div><div>Germany or Netherlands?</div><div>Last words, look up for your expertise first, if you are IT-IP guy, Germany is interesting.&nbsp;</div><div>
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