Leiden or LSE for employability


idogencos

Hi!

I have applied for Leiden's European and International Business Law Programme and LSE's General LLM. I recently received offer from both universities. However, I really wonder which one gives more chance in terms of the employability in Europe. It would be great if anyone answers or share his/her experience on both universities. I am trying to figure out if LSE is worth to their tuition fees.

Thanks a lot.

Hi!

I have applied for Leiden's European and International Business Law Programme and LSE's General LLM. I recently received offer from both universities. However, I really wonder which one gives more chance in terms of the employability in Europe. It would be great if anyone answers or share his/her experience on both universities. I am trying to figure out if LSE is worth to their tuition fees.

Thanks a lot.
quote
stasy1234

Hi!
Personally I have completed the EIBL programme, so my knowledge on the LSE's General LLM is not profound. However, I might give you a few notes to take into account.
Firstly, the answer really depends on your employment preferences. If you are interested in legal research (including a phd), then I would say that the Netherlands and especially Leiden is a perfect place to be. Unlike the UK, phds here are treated as employees, with salary, and not as simple students. The conditions for research are also great and absence of Dutch language is not critical.
On the other hand, if you are willing to go into practice, both London and the Netherlands can offer you positions in international organisations, corporations, law firms, etc. However, there are two aspects to consider. Firstly, in the Netherlands in 80 percent of cases Dutch language is essential (at least some level of it) - even if the work itself (e.g. documents) are in English. Obviously in London there is no language barrier. Secondly, it really depends on the stage of your (legal) career. If you are already a lawyer qualified elsewhere, it is easier to get employed both in the UK and in the Netherlands. Absence of a qualification means that the more practice oriented the vacancy is, the more limited your chances are. These two factors combined, I would say that London gives more options to choose - but also the competition there is more fierce.
Finally, a factor you should think about is the Brexit most likely happening. Being in the Netherlands essentially means that if you would choose so, you would be able to easily move anywhere in the EU and work there. With the UK it might become complicated.

I hope it helped!

Hi!
Personally I have completed the EIBL programme, so my knowledge on the LSE's General LLM is not profound. However, I might give you a few notes to take into account.
Firstly, the answer really depends on your employment preferences. If you are interested in legal research (including a phd), then I would say that the Netherlands and especially Leiden is a perfect place to be. Unlike the UK, phds here are treated as employees, with salary, and not as simple students. The conditions for research are also great and absence of Dutch language is not critical.
On the other hand, if you are willing to go into practice, both London and the Netherlands can offer you positions in international organisations, corporations, law firms, etc. However, there are two aspects to consider. Firstly, in the Netherlands in 80 percent of cases Dutch language is essential (at least some level of it) - even if the work itself (e.g. documents) are in English. Obviously in London there is no language barrier. Secondly, it really depends on the stage of your (legal) career. If you are already a lawyer qualified elsewhere, it is easier to get employed both in the UK and in the Netherlands. Absence of a qualification means that the more practice oriented the vacancy is, the more limited your chances are. These two factors combined, I would say that London gives more options to choose - but also the competition there is more fierce.
Finally, a factor you should think about is the Brexit most likely happening. Being in the Netherlands essentially means that if you would choose so, you would be able to easily move anywhere in the EU and work there. With the UK it might become complicated.

I hope it helped!
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

Leiden, Netherlands 564 Followers 483 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 719 Followers 896 Discussions

Other Related Content

LL.M. Application Deadlines for Fall 2020: Law Schools in Europe

News Oct 29, 2019