Practicing law after LL.M.?


AN
What do I need to practice law in Germany after completing a LL.M program? (My previous Bachelor degree was in Business Administration)

Does EU have general requirements for all countries or are the requirements country specific?
What do I need to practice law in Germany after completing a LL.M program? (My previous Bachelor degree was in Business Administration)

Does EU have general requirements for all countries or are the requirements country specific?
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LLMblogger
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TiGGer
For practicing law in Germany you either have to sit the two State Exams (takes around 7 years in total) or, when you are already qualified as a lawyer in another European country, you can do an aptitude test or practice your domestic law (not German law!) in Germany for I think three years. However, as you may imagine there is not that much to do for a lawyer from another jurisdiction with another country...
So overall, for practicing law in Germany you should at least be fully qualified as a lawyer in another (European) country.
For practicing law in Germany you either have to sit the two State Exams (takes around 7 years in total) or, when you are already qualified as a lawyer in another European country, you can do an aptitude test or practice your domestic law (not German law!) in Germany for I think three years. However, as you may imagine there is not that much to do for a lawyer from another jurisdiction with another country...
So overall, for practicing law in Germany you should at least be fully qualified as a lawyer in another (European) country.
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AN
Thank you for the information. Can I open a consulting or advisory practice for law after completing a LL.M. program? (not as a lawyer but as a legal consultant). Is that also regulated?
Thank you for the information. Can I open a consulting or advisory practice for law after completing a LL.M. program? (not as a lawyer but as a legal consultant). Is that also regulated?
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TiGGer
Funny coincidence: Today I walked along a sign at an office building saying "Mr XY...consultant on Chinese law" (in German). So, apparently this is possible - as long as you don't call yourself a "lawyer"!
Funny coincidence: Today I walked along a sign at an office building saying "Mr XY...consultant on Chinese law" (in German). So, apparently this is possible - as long as you don't call yourself a "lawyer"!
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I am a European citizen admitted to practice in the U.S. I do not hold a European law degree or bar qualification. Could anyone help me figure out what I need to do in order to practice law in Europe?

I've applied to U.S. law firms with offices in Europe, but most are interested in hiring EU-admitted lawyers. Specifically, I am interested in the practice of competition/anti-trust/trade law. Do I need to obtain a LL.M. in EU Law and re-qualify in a EU jurisdiction? What are the requirements to be admitted to practice in Belgium if you are a non-EU qualified lawyer?

Any guidance would be much appreciated!!!
I am a European citizen admitted to practice in the U.S. I do not hold a European law degree or bar qualification. Could anyone help me figure out what I need to do in order to practice law in Europe?

I've applied to U.S. law firms with offices in Europe, but most are interested in hiring EU-admitted lawyers. Specifically, I am interested in the practice of competition/anti-trust/trade law. Do I need to obtain a LL.M. in EU Law and re-qualify in a EU jurisdiction? What are the requirements to be admitted to practice in Belgium if you are a non-EU qualified lawyer?

Any guidance would be much appreciated!!!
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Laci
Hi!

A similar question interests me as well. I read a couple of things on this matter and I only found some information concerning how fully qualified lawyers can practice in a country different from where they earned their degree (I am talking about 2 EU countries here). I could not find any information however about how a lawyer, who only got his degree, never practiced anywhere (an articled clerk if you like) could get the entitlement to start his legal clerkship in a different EU county. To be precise I did this unsuccessful research about Germany.

Does anyone have any idea how this works in Germany?

The reason why I think that there is actually a way to do this, because I know a lawyer who earned her law degree in Tokio worked with the very same law firm (in Hungary though) I did my latest internship with. She was not admitted to practice in Japan, she was a fresh graduate like I will be in 4 months. She had to "nationalize" her degree which meant in practice that after the application she had to take the very same state exams the undergraduate law students studying in Hungary had to pass to earn their law degree. She is a holder of a certificate which says that her Japan law degree is equivalent to a Hungarian and this way she started her clerkship in Hungary.

Any ideas on this issue would be very much appreciated.

@ EU-oriented:

If you want to work as a foreign legal consultant that should not be a problem. If you want to work as an attorney...well that's a different story.

What I know is that fully qualified lawyers, e.g. who passed their bar exam in an EU country (in Germany their 2. state exam) are entitled to practice in other EU countries as well on certain conditions, which are different in every country. Like I said, I don't know about the process, but I know about attorneys admitted in the U.S. working as a foreign legal consultans in Hungary, but I don't know about any who would be an attorney admitted in Hungary as well.
Hi!

A similar question interests me as well. I read a couple of things on this matter and I only found some information concerning how fully qualified lawyers can practice in a country different from where they earned their degree (I am talking about 2 EU countries here). I could not find any information however about how a lawyer, who only got his degree, never practiced anywhere (an articled clerk if you like) could get the entitlement to start his legal clerkship in a different EU county. To be precise I did this unsuccessful research about Germany.

Does anyone have any idea how this works in Germany?

The reason why I think that there is actually a way to do this, because I know a lawyer who earned her law degree in Tokio worked with the very same law firm (in Hungary though) I did my latest internship with. She was not admitted to practice in Japan, she was a fresh graduate like I will be in 4 months. She had to "nationalize" her degree which meant in practice that after the application she had to take the very same state exams the undergraduate law students studying in Hungary had to pass to earn their law degree. She is a holder of a certificate which says that her Japan law degree is equivalent to a Hungarian and this way she started her clerkship in Hungary.

Any ideas on this issue would be very much appreciated.

@ EU-oriented:

If you want to work as a foreign legal consultant that should not be a problem. If you want to work as an attorney...well that's a different story.

What I know is that fully qualified lawyers, e.g. who passed their bar exam in an EU country (in Germany their 2. state exam) are entitled to practice in other EU countries as well on certain conditions, which are different in every country. Like I said, I don't know about the process, but I know about attorneys admitted in the U.S. working as a foreign legal consultans in Hungary, but I don't know about any who would be an attorney admitted in Hungary as well.
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Laci
this pretty much answers my question, take a look if you are interested:

http://www.kostenlose-urteile.de/EuGH-zur-Zulassung-von-Buergern-anderer-EU-Staaten-zum-deutschen-Rechtsreferendariat.news8912.htm
this pretty much answers my question, take a look if you are interested:

http://www.kostenlose-urteile.de/EuGH-zur-Zulassung-von-Buergern-anderer-EU-Staaten-zum-deutschen-Rechtsreferendariat.news8912.htm
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