LLM European Law Pantheon-Assas 2009/2010


mngolden

The LLM program is taught in English. I would contact the admissions office for further info.

Good luck!

The LLM program is taught in English. I would contact the admissions office for further info.

Good luck!
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mcunion

thank you

thank you
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mcunion

are there any other LLM programs in Paris besides the European College of Paris that are taught in English?

does anyone know how the 2009 inaugural class is fairing in the job market?

are there any other LLM programs in Paris besides the European College of Paris that are taught in English?

does anyone know how the 2009 inaugural class is fairing in the job market?
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ArunS

The LLM program is taught in English.


How do you know? I couldn't find any information on this on the website.

<blockquote>The LLM program is taught in English.</blockquote>

How do you know? I couldn't find any information on this on the website.
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mngolden

Because I am enrolled for the Fall and am a US lawyer as well. I would go to the website, navigate through it in French and it will direct you. I would call as well to get additional info. Good luck!

http://college-europeen-paris.u-paris2.fr/LLM/inscription_gb.html

Because I am enrolled for the Fall and am a US lawyer as well. I would go to the website, navigate through it in French and it will direct you. I would call as well to get additional info. Good luck!

http://college-europeen-paris.u-paris2.fr/LLM/inscription_gb.html
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ArunS

Thanks for the link!

Thanks for the link!
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Paris43

Hi all,

I would like to know whether this LLM program provides a good credential for getting a job at an international law firm in France. I'd also like to know whether the program is receptive to older professionals with established careers. I'm an American lawyer, interested in opening a new chapter in my career.

Thoughts?

Hi all,

I would like to know whether this LLM program provides a good credential for getting a job at an international law firm in France. I'd also like to know whether the program is receptive to older professionals with established careers. I'm an American lawyer, interested in opening a new chapter in my career.

Thoughts?
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tibaneli

We are all meeting on Sunday at 7 p.m for a drink (everyone who is starting in the fall) for more info you can get on the facebook group - ll.m. in european law universite paris 2: pantheon assas

We are all meeting on Sunday at 7 p.m for a drink (everyone who is starting in the fall) for more info you can get on the facebook group - ll.m. in european law universite paris 2: pantheon assas
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Azerty

"But in any case, the LLM is a great asset, but mostly for international firms in Paris, rather than French law firms, looking first for a qualification of advocate (M1 at least + Bar exam + 2 years of law school)."

Erasoft, I have a Dutch LL.B. and am about to finish my Dutch LL.M., so complete my law studies. However being admitted to the Dutch bar would take three years of professional training. I am trying to figure out how to be able to practice law in France. I understand from your post that international law firms in Paris might not require you to be qualified as an advocate? Is this only for foreign (US) lawyers who are already admitted to the bar in some other country? With just my Dutch law degree and not being admitted to any bar would the way to go be to study law for at least a year (or how long?) and sit the bar exam and all the training etc. after that?

"But in any case, the LLM is a great asset, but mostly for international firms in Paris, rather than French law firms, looking first for a qualification of advocate (M1 at least + Bar exam + 2 years of law school)."

Erasoft, I have a Dutch LL.B. and am about to finish my Dutch LL.M., so complete my law studies. However being admitted to the Dutch bar would take three years of professional training. I am trying to figure out how to be able to practice law in France. I understand from your post that international law firms in Paris might not require you to be qualified as an advocate? Is this only for foreign (US) lawyers who are already admitted to the bar in some other country? With just my Dutch law degree and not being admitted to any bar would the way to go be to study law for at least a year (or how long?) and sit the bar exam and all the training etc. after that?
quote
ellenvn

"But in any case, the LLM is a great asset, but mostly for international firms in Paris, rather than French law firms, looking first for a qualification of advocate (M1 at least + Bar exam + 2 years of law school)."

Erasoft, I have a Dutch LL.B. and am about to finish my Dutch LL.M., so complete my law studies. However being admitted to the Dutch bar would take three years of professional training. I am trying to figure out how to be able to practice law in France. I understand from your post that international law firms in Paris might not require you to be qualified as an advocate? Is this only for foreign (US) lawyers who are already admitted to the bar in some other country? With just my Dutch law degree and not being admitted to any bar would the way to go be to study law for at least a year (or how long?) and sit the bar exam and all the training etc. after that?


Hi Azerty,

Since you obtained your degree at a university located in the EU, it is possible to become a stagiaire at a French law firm. A law degree from a French university is not required. However, you need to dispose of a basic knowledge of French law, which means you have to sit an exam at the "barreau" [balie] where you enroll as an "avocat-stagiaire". Your knowledge of several fundamental law subjects (civil law, criminal law,...) will be tested.

<blockquote>"But in any case, the LLM is a great asset, but mostly for international firms in Paris, rather than French law firms, looking first for a qualification of advocate (M1 at least + Bar exam + 2 years of law school)."

Erasoft, I have a Dutch LL.B. and am about to finish my Dutch LL.M., so complete my law studies. However being admitted to the Dutch bar would take three years of professional training. I am trying to figure out how to be able to practice law in France. I understand from your post that international law firms in Paris might not require you to be qualified as an advocate? Is this only for foreign (US) lawyers who are already admitted to the bar in some other country? With just my Dutch law degree and not being admitted to any bar would the way to go be to study law for at least a year (or how long?) and sit the bar exam and all the training etc. after that?
</blockquote>

Hi Azerty,

Since you obtained your degree at a university located in the EU, it is possible to become a stagiaire at a French law firm. A law degree from a French university is not required. However, you need to dispose of a basic knowledge of French law, which means you have to sit an exam at the "barreau" [balie] where you enroll as an "avocat-stagiaire". Your knowledge of several fundamental law subjects (civil law, criminal law,...) will be tested.
quote
Azerty

Hey Ellenvn,

Thanks for your answer, this is very helpful. Good news, also. But do you mean the bar exam after which I would have to do the 18 months internships and courses and then another exam before I can start work at a law firm? Or are you talking about the second exam?

Anyway it would probably be necessary to study some French law to be able to pass the exam. Or are there special preparation courses?

Thanks!

Hey Ellenvn,

Thanks for your answer, this is very helpful. Good news, also. But do you mean the bar exam after which I would have to do the 18 months internships and courses and then another exam before I can start work at a law firm? Or are you talking about the second exam?

Anyway it would probably be necessary to study some French law to be able to pass the exam. Or are there special preparation courses?

Thanks!

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