Leiden or USC


Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))

Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))
quote

Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))


Dear llm_questions,

would you mind expanding on your

- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);
- short-term and long-term goals; and
- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,

so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.

Best,

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e

[quote]Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :))) [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,<br><br>would you mind expanding on your<br><br>- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);<br>- short-term and long-term goals; and<br>- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,<br><br>so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.<br><br>Best,<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem:
quote
Chris1225

I have the same/similar question. My objective of pursuing an LL.M is to repurpose my career in research and policy work in a foreign country. I’m South Asian, 10years PQE



Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))

I have the same/similar question. My objective of pursuing an LL.M is to repurpose my career in research and policy work in a foreign country. I’m South Asian, 10years PQE<br><br><br><br>[quote]Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :))) [/quote]
quote
Sophy H

Hi, there,

Firstly, congratulations on your admission to both Leiden and USC. I think it will be a  good choice to pursue an LLM in the US if you are intending to handle international legal transactions. Plus, it will definitely be a huge plus to your career. You can expand your network and interact with attorneys and classmates who come from different countries. 

Hi, there,<br><br>Firstly, congratulations on your admission to both Leiden and USC. I think it will be a&nbsp; good choice to pursue an LLM in the US if you are intending to handle international legal transactions. Plus, it will definitely be a huge plus to your career. You can expand your network and interact with attorneys and classmates who come from different countries.&nbsp;<div><br></div><div>
</div>
quote

Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))


Dear llm_questions,

would you mind expanding on your

- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);
- short-term and long-term goals; and
- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,

so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.

Best,

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e


Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))

[Edited by llm_questions on Apr 01, 2022]

[quote][quote]Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :))) [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,<br><br>would you mind expanding on your<br><br>- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);<br>- short-term and long-term goals; and<br>- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,<br><br>so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.<br><br>Best,<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem: [/quote]<br><br>Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))<br><br>
quote

Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :)))


Dear llm_questions,

would you mind expanding on your

- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);
- short-term and long-term goals; and
- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,

so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.

Best,

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e


Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))



Dear llm_questions, 

Thanks for your reply post detailing your background and goals.  Let me start off by saying that I believe European Universities provide a more “technical” approach to teaching, thus allowing for a more robust learning experience overall. US universities and LL.M. degrees are of course marketable. 

However, marketability can only take you so far. In my opinion, a US LL.M. really only make sense if (1) you get close to a full or 65% scholarship given the crazy tuition pricing, and/or (2) you are in some sort of niche or ultra-niche area (Asset Management/Funds, Compliance, Fashion Law, Space Law, etc…), and/or (3) your prior experience or future goals will not hold you back in obtaining employment in the US after your degree (i.e., the LL.M. cannot (or should not) be your main point of reliance for securing employment post-graduation). 

Leiden is incredibly prestigious in Europe. But, even more than prestige, the academic level of Leiden is absolutely incredible. It is no joke. The professors and the methods of teaching there are very high level. In contrast, I believe US universities allow for a more “fun”, “cross-sectional” learning experience (also taking into account the diversity of the student body, the geographic location and the resulting possibilities, the usually less-specialized program structures, etc…) 

Unless you have a 50/55% scholarship from USC Gould and unless you are dead set on living in California/USA, I don’t think it would be a sound investment (without further details). My advice to anyone here who considers working in the US is to consider their prior experience first and ask themselves if the LL.M. is everything they rely on or if it is simply an additional credential (to specialize, take a US bar, etc…). 

The reality is that if we’re talking about employment, an LL.M. alone does not suffice. 

It sounds like you are neither from Europe, nor the US. Immigration being much easier in the Europe than the US and based on your previous text, it does not sound like there would be very specific reasons to attend USC. I hope this helps. 

Best, 

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e

[Edited by UnleashedSoul on Apr 03, 2022]

[quote][quote][quote]Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :))) [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,<br><br>would you mind expanding on your<br><br>- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);<br>- short-term and long-term goals; and<br>- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,<br><br>so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.<br><br>Best,<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem: [/quote]<br><br>Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))<br><br> [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,&nbsp;<br><br>Thanks for your reply post detailing your background and goals.&nbsp;&nbsp;Let me start off by saying that I believe European Universities provide a more “technical” approach to teaching, thus allowing for a more robust learning experience overall.&nbsp;US universities and LL.M. degrees are of course marketable.&nbsp;<br><br>However, marketability can only take you so far.&nbsp;In my opinion, a US LL.M. really only make sense if (1) you get close to a full or 65% scholarship given the crazy tuition pricing, and/or (2) you are in some sort of niche or ultra-niche area (Asset Management/Funds, Compliance, Fashion Law, Space Law, etc…), and/or (3) your prior experience or future goals will not hold you back in obtaining employment in the US after your degree (i.e., the LL.M. cannot (or should not) be your main point of reliance for securing employment post-graduation).&nbsp;<br><br>Leiden is incredibly prestigious in Europe. But, even more than prestige, the academic level of Leiden is absolutely incredible. It is no joke. The professors and the methods of teaching there are very high level. In contrast, I believe US universities allow for a more “fun”, “cross-sectional” learning experience (also taking into account the diversity of the student body, the geographic location and the resulting possibilities, the usually less-specialized program structures, etc…)&nbsp;<br><br>Unless you have a 50/55% scholarship from USC Gould and unless you are dead set on living in California/USA, I don’t think it would be a sound investment (without further details). My advice to anyone here who considers working in the US is to consider their prior experience first and ask themselves if the LL.M. is everything they rely on or if it is simply an additional credential (to specialize, take a US bar, etc…).&nbsp;<br><br>The reality is that if we’re talking about employment, an LL.M. alone does not suffice.&nbsp;<br><br>It sounds like you are neither from Europe, nor the US. Immigration being much easier in the Europe than the US and based on your previous text, it does not sound like there would be very specific reasons to attend USC.&nbsp;I hope this helps.&nbsp;<br><br>Best,&nbsp;<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem:
quote
Sherlocked

Interesting.

Interesting.
quote

Thank you for the detailed response! means a lot to me :) I am wondering if your comments would differ in the case where the school in US is UCLA instead of USC? I am watlisted by UCLA but somehow all this waiting process made me want the school more :D I am also thinking if taking a student loan for US would be logical or not? What are the job finding chances realistically?

Thank you for the detailed response! means a lot to me :) I am wondering if your comments would differ in the case where the school in US is UCLA instead of USC? I am watlisted by UCLA but somehow all this waiting process made me want the school more :D I am also thinking if taking a student loan for US would be logical or not? What are the job finding chances realistically?
quote

Thank you for the detailed response! means a lot to me :) I am wondering if your comments would differ in the case where the school in US is UCLA instead of USC? I am watlisted by UCLA but somehow all this waiting process made me want the school more :D I am also thinking if taking a student loan for US would be logical or not? What are the job finding chances realistically?


Dear llm_questions,

I stand by my above opinion. While UCLA has slightly more marketability than USC (both in the US and outside), this does not drastically change the parameters you laid down earlier. I also believe none of these schools are worth more than 55% of their initial price in any scenario.
NYU estimates that approximately 15% of their LL.M. graduates (all specialities included) find post-graduation employment. 

Take this figure with a grain of salt, combine it with the number of US law schools offering LL.M. degrees, and take into account ranking/prestige/personal variables, and I'd say the chances are approx. less than 7.5% overall for all LL.M. graduates if you want to put down a number.

Best,


1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e

[Edited by UnleashedSoul on Apr 03, 2022]

[quote]Thank you for the detailed response! means a lot to me :) I am wondering if your comments would differ in the case where the school in US is UCLA instead of USC? I am watlisted by UCLA but somehow all this waiting process made me want the school more :D I am also thinking if taking a student loan for US would be logical or not? What are the job finding chances realistically? [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,<br><br><div>I stand by my above opinion. While UCLA has slightly more marketability than USC (both in the US and outside), this does not drastically change the parameters you laid down earlier. I also believe none of these schools are worth more than 55% of their initial price in any scenario.</div><br>NYU estimates that approximately 15% of their LL.M. graduates (all specialities included) find post-graduation employment.&nbsp;<br><br>Take this figure with a grain of salt, combine it with the number of US law schools offering LL.M. degrees, and take into account ranking/prestige/personal variables, and I'd say the chances are approx. less than 7.5% overall for all LL.M. graduates if you want to put down a number.<br><br><div>Best,<br></div><div><br>
</div><div>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem:</div>
quote
Sherlocked

@UnleashedSoul has 2.5% out of those 7.5% offers :')

@UnleashedSoul has 2.5% out of those 7.5% offers :')
quote

I have the same/similar question. My objective of pursuing an LL.M is to repurpose my career in research and policy work in a foreign country. I’m South Asian, 10years PQE.


Which LL.M.'s are we talking about?

You definitely seem to have an interesting profile. How is your financial situation?

Best,

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e

[quote]I have the same/similar question. My objective of pursuing an LL.M is to repurpose my career in research and policy work in a foreign country. I’m South Asian, 10years PQE. [/quote] [/quote]<br><br>Which LL.M.'s are we talking about?<br><br>You definitely seem to have an interesting profile. How is your financial situation?<br><br>Best,<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem:
quote
Arcanom


This is one of the most realistic posts Ive seen around in a while! Great write up.




Dear llm_questions,

would you mind expanding on your

- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);
- short-term and long-term goals; and
- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,

so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.

Best,

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e


Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))



Dear llm_questions, 

Thanks for your reply post detailing your background and goals.  Let me start off by saying that I believe European Universities provide a more “technical” approach to teaching, thus allowing for a more robust learning experience overall. US universities and LL.M. degrees are of course marketable. 

However, marketability can only take you so far. In my opinion, a US LL.M. really only make sense if (1) you get close to a full or 65% scholarship given the crazy tuition pricing, and/or (2) you are in some sort of niche or ultra-niche area (Asset Management/Funds, Compliance, Fashion Law, Space Law, etc…), and/or (3) your prior experience or future goals will not hold you back in obtaining employment in the US after your degree (i.e., the LL.M. cannot (or should not) be your main point of reliance for securing employment post-graduation). 

Leiden is incredibly prestigious in Europe. But, even more than prestige, the academic level of Leiden is absolutely incredible. It is no joke. The professors and the methods of teaching there are very high level. In contrast, I believe US universities allow for a more “fun”, “cross-sectional” learning experience (also taking into account the diversity of the student body, the geographic location and the resulting possibilities, the usually less-specialized program structures, etc…) 

Unless you have a 50/55% scholarship from USC Gould and unless you are dead set on living in California/USA, I don’t think it would be a sound investment (without further details). My advice to anyone here who considers working in the US is to consider their prior experience first and ask themselves if the LL.M. is everything they rely on or if it is simply an additional credential (to specialize, take a US bar, etc…). 

The reality is that if we’re talking about employment, an LL.M. alone does not suffice. 

It sounds like you are neither from Europe, nor the US. Immigration being much easier in the Europe than the US and based on your previous text, it does not sound like there would be very specific reasons to attend USC. I hope this helps. 

Best, 

1f48eUnleashedSoul1f48e

<br>This is one of the most realistic posts Ive seen around in a while! Great write up.<br><br><br>[quote][quote][quote][quote]Hi everyone! I have been accepted to both Leiden and USC but can't decide whether I should pursue LLM in US or not? I'd really appreciate any comments and recommendations, thanks in advance :))) [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,<br><br>would you mind expanding on your<br><br>- background (which jurisdiction, (if) years and type of legal experience, etc...);<br>- short-term and long-term goals; and<br>- which (specific) programs you have been accepted to,<br><br>so as to be able to best advise you precisely on which program would suit your expectations.<br><br>Best,<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem: [/quote]<br><br>Hi again, I have 2 years of work experience and my main goal to pursue LLM is to be able to find a job in that country after llm. Leiden is highly prestigious in Europe but I am not sure how USC is seen that way internationally or within the US? Also, after Leiden I don't think I can ever "jump" to US but is a US LLM degree more helpful while looking for jobs in EU or UK? Also if I pick USC I will be paying a lot. I am questioning if it is realy worth it? thank you all in advance for replies :))<br><br> [/quote]<br><br>Dear llm_questions,&nbsp;<br><br>Thanks for your reply post detailing your background and goals.&nbsp;&nbsp;Let me start off by saying that I believe European Universities provide a more “technical” approach to teaching, thus allowing for a more robust learning experience overall.&nbsp;US universities and LL.M. degrees are of course marketable.&nbsp;<br><br>However, marketability can only take you so far.&nbsp;In my opinion, a US LL.M. really only make sense if (1) you get close to a full or 65% scholarship given the crazy tuition pricing, and/or (2) you are in some sort of niche or ultra-niche area (Asset Management/Funds, Compliance, Fashion Law, Space Law, etc…), and/or (3) your prior experience or future goals will not hold you back in obtaining employment in the US after your degree (i.e., the LL.M. cannot (or should not) be your main point of reliance for securing employment post-graduation).&nbsp;<br><br>Leiden is incredibly prestigious in Europe. But, even more than prestige, the academic level of Leiden is absolutely incredible. It is no joke. The professors and the methods of teaching there are very high level. In contrast, I believe US universities allow for a more “fun”, “cross-sectional” learning experience (also taking into account the diversity of the student body, the geographic location and the resulting possibilities, the usually less-specialized program structures, etc…)&nbsp;<br><br>Unless you have a 50/55% scholarship from USC Gould and unless you are dead set on living in California/USA, I don’t think it would be a sound investment (without further details). My advice to anyone here who considers working in the US is to consider their prior experience first and ask themselves if the LL.M. is everything they rely on or if it is simply an additional credential (to specialize, take a US bar, etc…).&nbsp;<br><br>The reality is that if we’re talking about employment, an LL.M. alone does not suffice.&nbsp;<br><br>It sounds like you are neither from Europe, nor the US. Immigration being much easier in the Europe than the US and based on your previous text, it does not sound like there would be very specific reasons to attend USC.&nbsp;I hope this helps.&nbsp;<br><br>Best,&nbsp;<br><br>:gem:UnleashedSoul:gem: [/quote]
quote

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