LLM Medical Law and Ethics


sarahd
Hi all. I am interested in stufying for an LLM in Ethics in the UK with a view to moving away from commercial law (which I currently practise) and into working for either a health trust or another medical organisation. Has anyone heard of a good distance learning course which is recognised and can steer me in the right direction? I have had a quick look at Manchester and Leicester universities but have no idea if the courses are any good or not. Thanks for your help in advance
Hi all. I am interested in stufying for an LLM in Ethics in the UK with a view to moving away from commercial law (which I currently practise) and into working for either a health trust or another medical organisation. Has anyone heard of a good distance learning course which is recognised and can steer me in the right direction? I have had a quick look at Manchester and Leicester universities but have no idea if the courses are any good or not. Thanks for your help in advance
quote
C.Miller
The University of Edinburgh's LL.M (distance learning) covers Law and Medical Ethics. We also run short-courses (ecpd Law and Medical Ethics) for medical practitioners, which start again in October. These are designed with medical practitioners in mind, rather than lawyers, but even so you would be given an excellent view on the issues of concern in medical practice and could be of real added value to all eCPD students to be part of such an interdisciplinary group.

Late entry to the LL.M is possible up to teh end of August, early September and eCPD will be open soon for offline and online registration!

More information about distance learning opportunities at The University of Edinburgh is available here: www.law.ed.ac.uk/distancelearning/

I know too that Glasgow have an LL.M which I believe is exceptionally popular, and runs one once ever two years. You can check that out here: http://www.llm-guide.com/university/135/glasgow-graduate-school-of-law-ggsl-universities-of-glasgow-and-strathclyde
The University of Edinburgh's LL.M (distance learning) covers Law and Medical Ethics. We also run short-courses (ecpd Law and Medical Ethics) for medical practitioners, which start again in October. These are designed with medical practitioners in mind, rather than lawyers, but even so you would be given an excellent view on the issues of concern in medical practice and could be of real added value to all eCPD students to be part of such an interdisciplinary group.

Late entry to the LL.M is possible up to teh end of August, early September and eCPD will be open soon for offline and online registration!

More information about distance learning opportunities at The University of Edinburgh is available here: www.law.ed.ac.uk/distancelearning/

I know too that Glasgow have an LL.M which I believe is exceptionally popular, and runs one once ever two years. You can check that out here: http://www.llm-guide.com/university/135/glasgow-graduate-school-of-law-ggsl-universities-of-glasgow-and-strathclyde
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Jazzman
Hi sarahd,

I know that Manchester's MA in Medical Ethics & Law is very good. My mother who is a nurse is currently a distance-learning student. She likes the fact that it has a mix of both lawyers and medical professionals enrolled.

Manchester is very strong in this area - one of her professors is Margaret Brazier = who has written a great deal in this field.

In terms of non=distance learning - the course at King's College, London is the best by a long way because they have the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics based at the school.
Hi sarahd,

I know that Manchester's MA in Medical Ethics & Law is very good. My mother who is a nurse is currently a distance-learning student. She likes the fact that it has a mix of both lawyers and medical professionals enrolled.

Manchester is very strong in this area - one of her professors is Margaret Brazier = who has written a great deal in this field.

In terms of non=distance learning - the course at King's College, London is the best by a long way because they have the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics based at the school.
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sarahd
thanks very much for your helpful reply - I am very grateful!
thanks very much for your helpful reply - I am very grateful!

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Ralph16
Could someone avdise me about the medical law and ethics programme at QMUL? Is it good? And what about King's College?
Could someone avdise me about the medical law and ethics programme at QMUL? Is it good? And what about King's College?
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mamoyo
Sorry for a late post... but avoid Northumbria.....they have an LLM Medical Law...not good
Sorry for a late post... but avoid Northumbria.....they have an LLM Medical Law...not good
quote
Not sure about the others but Edinburgh has an excellent LLM programme in Medical Law and Ethics headed by Professor Graeme Laurie who is a top academic in the field. You can find out more by following this link: http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/teaching/llm/llmmedicallaw/
Have had several seminars by Prof Laurie and he is very interested in helping students and extremely committed to the success of the distance programme.
Best of luck!
Not sure about the others but Edinburgh has an excellent LLM programme in Medical Law and Ethics headed by Professor Graeme Laurie who is a top academic in the field. You can find out more by following this link: http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/teaching/llm/llmmedicallaw/
Have had several seminars by Prof Laurie and he is very interested in helping students and extremely committed to the success of the distance programme.
Best of luck!
quote
yogi
Not sure about the others but Edinburgh has an excellent LLM programme in Medical Law and Ethics headed by Professor Graeme Laurie who is a top academic in the field. You can find out more by following this link: http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/teaching/llm/llmmedicallaw/
Have had several seminars by Prof Laurie and he is very interested in helping students and extremely committed to the success of the distance programme.
Best of luck!



That may well be the case, but lets be honest - Edinburgh Uni's fees are completely over-the-top - £11,800 (£10620 for previous students at the University) for a distance learning course is madness. It's very difficult to come up with any plausible explanation for such a high fee other than it being a great revenue stream for the University.
<blockquote>Not sure about the others but Edinburgh has an excellent LLM programme in Medical Law and Ethics headed by Professor Graeme Laurie who is a top academic in the field. You can find out more by following this link: http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/teaching/llm/llmmedicallaw/
Have had several seminars by Prof Laurie and he is very interested in helping students and extremely committed to the success of the distance programme.
Best of luck!</blockquote>


That may well be the case, but lets be honest - Edinburgh Uni's fees are completely over-the-top - £11,800 (£10620 for previous students at the University) for a distance learning course is madness. It's very difficult to come up with any plausible explanation for such a high fee other than it being a great revenue stream for the University.
quote
Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had.
Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had.
quote
yogi
Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had.


But whether it's worth the extra premium above other universities is open to debate ... put another way - i'm yet to be convinced the "high quality" at Edinburgh is worth several thousand more than the presumably 'lower' quality elsewhere.
<blockquote>Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had. </blockquote>

But whether it's worth the extra premium above other universities is open to debate ... put another way - i'm yet to be convinced the "high quality" at Edinburgh is worth several thousand more than the presumably 'lower' quality elsewhere.
quote
canoe
Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had.


That is very fair. Honestly, when one looks at the cost of quality education around the globe, the UK LLM fees are very reasonable.

My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?
<blockquote>Fees are fees. I have paid overseas tuition for 3 years at Edinburgh and wouldn't begrudge a dime of it for the high quality of academic input I have had. </blockquote>

That is very fair. Honestly, when one looks at the cost of quality education around the globe, the UK LLM fees are very reasonable.

My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?
quote
fjclark
The University of Dundee offers a distance learning LLM in Healthcare Law & Ethics. Again, this is targetted more towards healthcare professionals rather than trained lawyers but may be of interest:-

http://www.dundee.ac.uk/law/healthcare/index.htm
The University of Dundee offers a distance learning LLM in Healthcare Law & Ethics. Again, this is targetted more towards healthcare professionals rather than trained lawyers but may be of interest:-

http://www.dundee.ac.uk/law/healthcare/index.htm
quote
My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?

As for your questions above, I cannot answer other than the LLM will give you insight into aspects of medicine that are not typically addressed in the practice of medicine, outwith those who work as researchers. The knowledge transfer between law and medicine that I have seen at this university has been very interesting, even though not in my field. Advanced degrees are what they are, an avenue to learn more for those who have the desire.
For an LLM, the same could be said for US practicing attorneys...an LLM is not necessary but it helps you learn more about specific areas. What you do with your degree once you have it is entirely up to the individual. Best of luck.
My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?

As for your questions above, I cannot answer other than the LLM will give you insight into aspects of medicine that are not typically addressed in the practice of medicine, outwith those who work as researchers. The knowledge transfer between law and medicine that I have seen at this university has been very interesting, even though not in my field. Advanced degrees are what they are, an avenue to learn more for those who have the desire.
For an LLM, the same could be said for US practicing attorneys...an LLM is not necessary but it helps you learn more about specific areas. What you do with your degree once you have it is entirely up to the individual. Best of luck.
quote
cheung
Sorry for a late post... but avoid Northumbria.....they have an LLM Medical Law...not good


The school is... problem one, my friend had been studies this one.
The comment is that :
their practice essay is use for help the new student, but the comment is different to real assignment.. ???
their study rule would be changed once you appliced , honesty???
assigement result come from one marker, no counter check, no appeal.
If you is one other than doctor or other law professioner, you will not eassy to pass the LLM.


Cheung
<blockquote>Sorry for a late post... but avoid Northumbria.....they have an LLM Medical Law...not good</blockquote>

The school is... problem one, my friend had been studies this one.
The comment is that :
their practice essay is use for help the new student, but the comment is different to real assignment.. ???
their study rule would be changed once you appliced , honesty???
assigement result come from one marker, no counter check, no appeal.
If you is one other than doctor or other law professioner, you will not eassy to pass the LLM.


Cheung
quote
Interalia
My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?


For a doctor, I guess the practical use would be knowing what to do to avoid malpractice law suits, especially in litigation happy jurisdictions.

It might also come in handy if they have to do disciplinary hearings for other doctors.
<blockquote>My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?</blockquote>

For a doctor, I guess the practical use would be knowing what to do to avoid malpractice law suits, especially in litigation happy jurisdictions.

It might also come in handy if they have to do disciplinary hearings for other doctors.
quote
cheung
My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?


For a doctor, I guess the practical use would be knowing what to do to avoid malpractice law suits, especially in litigation happy jurisdictions.

It might also come in handy if they have to do disciplinary hearings for other doctors.


The U stressed to promot the course hospital, and was accepted as contiuing studing requirement by their medical field . Something I don't know in the fact that is a docror, who was recognised the english communication lower than BA in WWW, but their english presentation ability will got the best mark than Bar or other LLB holder .

On the other hand, if you is a law student, I suggest you select a course in a real master of law
<blockquote><blockquote>My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?</blockquote>

For a doctor, I guess the practical use would be knowing what to do to avoid malpractice law suits, especially in litigation happy jurisdictions.

It might also come in handy if they have to do disciplinary hearings for other doctors. </blockquote>

The U stressed to promot the course hospital, and was accepted as contiuing studing requirement by their medical field . Something I don't know in the fact that is a docror, who was recognised the english communication lower than BA in WWW, but their english presentation ability will got the best mark than Bar or other LLB holder .

On the other hand, if you is a law student, I suggest you select a course in a real master of law
quote
cheung
My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?


Anyone agree a dog , whether dressing a swimming suit or not, is a professional swimming than a shark.

Please reply me...
<blockquote>My question is as follows: Except for self-satisfaction and betterment, why would a practising doctor wish to do the LLM?

Of what practical use can he put the LLM to? If not, why go in that direction. Isn't the MPH a better avenue?</blockquote>

Anyone agree a dog , whether dressing a swimming suit or not, is a professional swimming than a shark.

Please reply me...
quote
Ralph16
The LLm at QMUL is really topnotch. Queen Mary has undisputedly the best student-professor relationship. In addition their professors are among the best in the field. Moreover they lead one of the most rewarding centres in UK Medical Law. Check their site for more info.
The LLm at QMUL is really topnotch. Queen Mary has undisputedly the best student-professor relationship. In addition their professors are among the best in the field. Moreover they lead one of the most rewarding centres in UK Medical Law. Check their site for more info.
quote
cheung
Sorry, I am not talking about QM, the U for selling LLM is NU,


or MU, or tU, or X U
Sorry, I am not talking about QM, the U for selling LLM is NU,












or MU, or tU, or X U

quote
"PLEASE READ"
Guys sorry to break the bubble of all those vouching for how good Manchester Uni is (also known as Uniof ) but it is nothing as all of you seem to know of it above .
I got a chev scholarship and made the mistake of choosing Manchester Uni over the london ones being expensive and also because i had some relatives there and due to the costs of living which till date i regret . It is indeed embarrasing but i have to admit that i am appalled at the way LLM is conducted in this uni and for me it broke all my expectations at what education in the UK would be like . I have a million reasons not to recommend University of Manchester for LLM ( and only a few to do ) . Althought the rankings of the university have gone down in the past few years ( the rankings only represent the undergrad law school ranking btw) it is far better than what it should actually be . Most of the professors are either retired barristers out of touch with the current happenings in the legal sphere or Phd students who are usually doing it to get grants and are usually not much older (knowledgeable) than you are being stumped at usual interventions . Most of the studies are expected to take place before or after coming to class and the only thing done by professors is enlighten on topics given out of pre printed module sheets . The exams again are not fair as each question carries 33 marks and you are expected to understand and attempt all your semesters learnings at the risky attempt of 3 out of 4 questions which in my view can never justify a students ability . There have been instances where 98% students in a particular class have failed . Classes are usually 2-3 hours a day a maximum of 3 times a week leaving a lot of time for you to wonder . The Class would mostly be filled by South Asian (read India Pak SL Bangladesh) or South East Asian (Chinese Malaysian Korean ) students and a below 10% of east european students and only maybe 2%-3% of British students missing the whole point of getting an international experience as most of the British students take up LPC or training contracts after their LLB's . Finding Jobs are a big no no with a Manchester Uni LLM . Anyways looks like I can go on forever here so if you have any further questions please email me or message me here and i shall be very glad to help you out . Cheers.
"PLEASE READ"
Guys sorry to break the bubble of all those vouching for how good Manchester Uni is (also known as Uniof ) but it is nothing as all of you seem to know of it above .
I got a chev scholarship and made the mistake of choosing Manchester Uni over the london ones being expensive and also because i had some relatives there and due to the costs of living which till date i regret . It is indeed embarrasing but i have to admit that i am appalled at the way LLM is conducted in this uni and for me it broke all my expectations at what education in the UK would be like . I have a million reasons not to recommend University of Manchester for LLM ( and only a few to do ) . Althought the rankings of the university have gone down in the past few years ( the rankings only represent the undergrad law school ranking btw) it is far better than what it should actually be . Most of the professors are either retired barristers out of touch with the current happenings in the legal sphere or Phd students who are usually doing it to get grants and are usually not much older (knowledgeable) than you are being stumped at usual interventions . Most of the studies are expected to take place before or after coming to class and the only thing done by professors is enlighten on topics given out of pre printed module sheets . The exams again are not fair as each question carries 33 marks and you are expected to understand and attempt all your semesters learnings at the risky attempt of 3 out of 4 questions which in my view can never justify a students ability . There have been instances where 98% students in a particular class have failed . Classes are usually 2-3 hours a day a maximum of 3 times a week leaving a lot of time for you to wonder . The Class would mostly be filled by South Asian (read India Pak SL Bangladesh) or South East Asian (Chinese Malaysian Korean ) students and a below 10% of east european students and only maybe 2%-3% of British students missing the whole point of getting an international experience as most of the British students take up LPC or training contracts after their LLB's . Finding Jobs are a big no no with a Manchester Uni LLM . Anyways looks like I can go on forever here so if you have any further questions please email me or message me here and i shall be very glad to help you out . Cheers.
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