New York Bar Exam


taxllm

I am curious why you believe you qualify without an LLM or instruction from an ABA or CA approved law school?


http://calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/calbar_generic.jsp?sImagePath=Bar_Exam.gif&sCategoryPath=/Home/Attorney%20Resources/Bar%20Exam&sHeading=Rules%20Regulating%20Admission%20to%20Practice%20Law%20in%20California&sFileType=HTML&sCatHtmlPath=html/Admissions_Rules-Regulating-Admission.html

I am curious why you believe you qualify without an LLM or instruction from an ABA or CA approved law school?


http://calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/calbar_generic.jsp?sImagePath=Bar_Exam.gif&sCategoryPath=/Home/Attorney%20Resources/Bar%20Exam&sHeading=Rules%20Regulating%20Admission%20to%20Practice%20Law%20in%20California&sFileType=HTML&sCatHtmlPath=html/Admissions_Rules-Regulating-Admission.html
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fg

Ummmm...because you can. So confused. I feel like we have gone over this so many times in this forum.

Ummmm...because you can. So confused. I feel like we have gone over this so many times in this forum.
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taxllm

I didn't say that a foreign trained attorney can't qualify to take the CBX. I said what makes the prior poster think HE or SHE qualifies, becuase CA's CBX requires 4 years of legal instruction for foreign trained attorneys in a CL country, whereas an LL.B in the UK only requires 3 years of study... thus presumably one without such education needs another (1) year of legal instruction in CA (e.g., a 1 year ll.m.)

I didn't say that a foreign trained attorney can't qualify to take the CBX. I said what makes the prior poster think HE or SHE qualifies, becuase CA's CBX requires 4 years of legal instruction for foreign trained attorneys in a CL country, whereas an LL.B in the UK only requires 3 years of study... thus presumably one without such education needs another (1) year of legal instruction in CA (e.g., a 1 year ll.m.)
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fg

I don't know the CA bar rules but I know one of my friends from Australia got admitted in California. His degree was a conjoint - five years (effectively 3 of law and 2 of Arts).
I think you can sit the Californian Bar if you are admitted in your own country though (I am not sure if that is only for Commonwealth people). There is a blog/sticky post somewhere on this site that discusses it.

I don't know the CA bar rules but I know one of my friends from Australia got admitted in California. His degree was a conjoint - five years (effectively 3 of law and 2 of Arts).
I think you can sit the Californian Bar if you are admitted in your own country though (I am not sure if that is only for Commonwealth people). There is a blog/sticky post somewhere on this site that discusses it.
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taxllm

I guess there must be other alternatives or exceptions for the 3YR ABA or 4YR CL requirement for certification that I was not aware of. I admit I havent looked at any other posts on the subject. I'm only familiar with the general requirements for CBX since I studied law in CA, so my school must've not told us about exceptions that wouldn't apply for us.

I guess there must be other alternatives or exceptions for the 3YR ABA or 4YR CL requirement for certification that I was not aware of. I admit I havent looked at any other posts on the subject. I'm only familiar with the general requirements for CBX since I studied law in CA, so my school must've not told us about exceptions that wouldn't apply for us.
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Seesaw

First, with regard to the UK trainee solicitor. It is correct, but not the full story that a UK LL.B. is completed in three years if it isn't a combo degree. I did a BA Law and Criminology and that was four years. However, after your LL.B. you have an additional year doing your common professional exam (CPE) and then you have two-year's Articles (now just referred to as a training contract) where you get on the job training. You must complete all of this before you can become a solicitor (e.g. six years), so don't get stuck on the fact the LL.B. itself is only three years. You can't become a solicitor in the UK with just a LL.B.

Second thing, I have a LL.M. and I took and passed the Feb 2007 NY Bar Exam the first time. Yes, it is difficult because of how much you have to learn and memorize. It is a true ten-week endurance test. However, if you prepare properly it is not difficult at all (NOTE: you CANNOT work and devote enough time to this endeavor, it is a ten-week 10-14 hour a day job by itself). I came out of the exam both days figuring I had failed because I thought it was relatively easy after all of the preparation. I did the full BarBri course and I had the PMBR CD's and books too. I scored a 145 raw on the MBE. The MBE (200 multi-choice questions) is worth 40% (someone above said it is worth 60%, which is not the case). The five NY essays are also worth 40%. There is a NY practical exam worth 10% and the NY multiple-choice questions (50 of them) are also worth 10%. Therefore, the NY section of the bar is worth a total of 60% and the multi-state is worth 40%.

First, with regard to the UK trainee solicitor. It is correct, but not the full story that a UK LL.B. is completed in three years if it isn't a combo degree. I did a BA Law and Criminology and that was four years. However, after your LL.B. you have an additional year doing your common professional exam (CPE) and then you have two-year's Articles (now just referred to as a training contract) where you get on the job training. You must complete all of this before you can become a solicitor (e.g. six years), so don't get stuck on the fact the LL.B. itself is only three years. You can't become a solicitor in the UK with just a LL.B.

Second thing, I have a LL.M. and I took and passed the Feb 2007 NY Bar Exam the first time. Yes, it is difficult because of how much you have to learn and memorize. It is a true ten-week endurance test. However, if you prepare properly it is not difficult at all (NOTE: you CANNOT work and devote enough time to this endeavor, it is a ten-week 10-14 hour a day job by itself). I came out of the exam both days figuring I had failed because I thought it was relatively easy after all of the preparation. I did the full BarBri course and I had the PMBR CD's and books too. I scored a 145 raw on the MBE. The MBE (200 multi-choice questions) is worth 40% (someone above said it is worth 60%, which is not the case). The five NY essays are also worth 40%. There is a NY practical exam worth 10% and the NY multiple-choice questions (50 of them) are also worth 10%. Therefore, the NY section of the bar is worth a total of 60% and the multi-state is worth 40%.
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Parvez

Visit :http://www.barbri.com

Visit :http://www.barbri.com
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jeffn

I got my LLB from Kenya.I took the february 2007 New York Bar and failed.I guess i did not study enough.I still had a full time job while studying for the Bar.Not A good idea obviously.I just took and passed my MPRE and i want to prepare for the NY bar for FEB 2008.
I need some help in understanding the grading.
1) How many points is each essay worth raw?
2)Is it true that the NY multiple choice questions are so difficult that it is virtually impossible to get more than 55% right?
3)How many points can i aim for to score on each part to ensure a realistic hope of passing?
4)Are 4 months of dedicated study sufficient?
5)Any tips?

I got my LLB from Kenya.I took the february 2007 New York Bar and failed.I guess i did not study enough.I still had a full time job while studying for the Bar.Not A good idea obviously.I just took and passed my MPRE and i want to prepare for the NY bar for FEB 2008.
I need some help in understanding the grading.
1) How many points is each essay worth raw?
2)Is it true that the NY multiple choice questions are so difficult that it is virtually impossible to get more than 55% right?
3)How many points can i aim for to score on each part to ensure a realistic hope of passing?
4)Are 4 months of dedicated study sufficient?
5)Any tips?
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gkh_2005

Were you able to obtain a job in the US ??

How did u manage, can you please inform.

Were you able to obtain a job in the US ??

How did u manage, can you please inform.
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jeffn

Yes. I do have a job in the US.But my job has nothing to do with law or law practice.it took me a while to realise that i qualify to take the New york Bar based on my LLB and admission in my home country.I am a permanent resident here.

Yes. I do have a job in the US.But my job has nothing to do with law or law practice.it took me a while to realise that i qualify to take the New york Bar based on my LLB and admission in my home country.I am a permanent resident here.
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zoha_b

Hello, I am a UK LLB graduate (high 2:1) and I had plans to move back to the states and sit the new york bar. I was told however, very recently by an american lawyer that my chances of finding a job upon passing the bar exam are very slim and if I want to find a decent job in a law firm, i would have to do the JD which is means, another 3 whole years of law!!! does anyone know whether or not there's any way to get around this?!

Hello, I am a UK LLB graduate (high 2:1) and I had plans to move back to the states and sit the new york bar. I was told however, very recently by an american lawyer that my chances of finding a job upon passing the bar exam are very slim and if I want to find a decent job in a law firm, i would have to do the JD which is means, another 3 whole years of law!!! does anyone know whether or not there's any way to get around this?!
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gkh_2005

Your American friend is right. I have learnt it in a hard way, it is extremely difficult to find a job without a J.D. from a reputed University. Doing a LL.M. from top ten university might land you a job. However, you will be taking a chance.

As far as bright propsects for a job is concerned, J.D. is everything in the U.S.

Your American friend is right. I have learnt it in a hard way, it is extremely difficult to find a job without a J.D. from a reputed University. Doing a LL.M. from top ten university might land you a job. However, you will be taking a chance.

As far as bright propsects for a job is concerned, J.D. is everything in the U.S.
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Can anyone please help me out:

As a German qualified Lawyer awarded my first law degree from Germany and a internal LLM from the University of London, am I eligible to sit the New York Bar Exam? After reading the "Rules" it appears that the requirements are to study a 20 credit program with at least 2 basic courses in American law, in an approved law school.

My questions: 1. Is Queen Mary, University of London an ABA approved law school?
2. Is there a way to take the basic courses on American law, let's say in a summer course etc?

Any help would be highly appreciated!

Can anyone please help me out:

As a German qualified Lawyer awarded my first law degree from Germany and a internal LLM from the University of London, am I eligible to sit the New York Bar Exam? After reading the "Rules" it appears that the requirements are to study a 20 credit program with at least 2 basic courses in American law, in an approved law school.

My questions: 1. Is Queen Mary, University of London an ABA approved law school?
2. Is there a way to take the basic courses on American law, let's say in a summer course etc?

Any help would be highly appreciated!
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Russ

My questions: 1. Is Queen Mary, University of London an ABA approved law school?



The ABA only approves US law schools. For a full list of ABA approved schools click here: http://www.abanet.org/legaled/approvedlawschools/alpha.html

<blockquote>My questions: 1. Is Queen Mary, University of London an ABA approved law school?

</blockquote>

The ABA only approves US law schools. For a full list of ABA approved schools click here: http://www.abanet.org/legaled/approvedlawschools/alpha.html
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Okay, thanks - I didn't know that.

So is there any chance to sit the NY bar with an LLM awarded outside the USA from another common law jurisdiction eg. England?

Okay, thanks - I didn't know that.

So is there any chance to sit the NY bar with an LLM awarded outside the USA from another common law jurisdiction eg. England?
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I havent read all the stuff in this thread, so maybe this is redundant, but I know for SURE that anyonw holding an LLb or JD from a canadian law school can sit the NY bar. I know several people who have done so.

I havent read all the stuff in this thread, so maybe this is redundant, but I know for SURE that anyonw holding an LLb or JD from a canadian law school can sit the NY bar. I know several people who have done so.
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susiee

You need to have done a three-year degree from a common law country to be eligible to pass the bar exam, so it appears that a one-year llm would probably not be enough to sit the bar exam. unfortunately, the only other route is to do an ll.m at a us law school...

You need to have done a three-year degree from a common law country to be eligible to pass the bar exam, so it appears that a one-year llm would probably not be enough to sit the bar exam. unfortunately, the only other route is to do an ll.m at a us law school...
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akiela

hey i was asking in some other posts. does anyone know what law school offers a program that will allow me to practise law anywhere in canada or US.
i.e. i can move from canada to US and still be eligible to practise law

hey i was asking in some other posts. does anyone know what law school offers a program that will allow me to practise law anywhere in canada or US.
i.e. i can move from canada to US and still be eligible to practise law
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I am LLB from India and planning to take bar exams in Tennessee in july 08. I am told from the board of law examiners, TN that I need to file the notice of intent and applicaton then they will let me know if I am eligible. Do you guys have any idea about this ?
thanks

I am LLB from India and planning to take bar exams in Tennessee in july 08. I am told from the board of law examiners, TN that I need to file the notice of intent and applicaton then they will let me know if I am eligible. Do you guys have any idea about this ?
thanks
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jeffn

I finally passed the NY Bar on the second attempt.See my first post on this thread. It was quite hard but i realized that the key is in taking a FULL bar review course and putting in many hours of study.i believe that it is next to impossible to pass the bar without taking a Bar Review course.The other critical thing is to make sure to hve AT LEAST 2 months clear to do nothing else but take the bar review course and study.

I was admitted to the New York State Bar on june 24th, 2008.

The next hurdle, which is really formidable, is getting a job actually.I know it is very hard for a foreign trained attorney to get a job.
Anyone with some ideas to share?

I finally passed the NY Bar on the second attempt.See my first post on this thread. It was quite hard but i realized that the key is in taking a FULL bar review course and putting in many hours of study.i believe that it is next to impossible to pass the bar without taking a Bar Review course.The other critical thing is to make sure to hve AT LEAST 2 months clear to do nothing else but take the bar review course and study.

I was admitted to the New York State Bar on june 24th, 2008.

The next hurdle, which is really formidable, is getting a job actually.I know it is very hard for a foreign trained attorney to get a job.
Anyone with some ideas to share?
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