Job opportunities after llm in usa


If you are intent on working in the U.S., you really will need a JD degree. At Drexel, we offer what we call the Global Access JD for students who have an LLB (or even an LLM) from outside the U.S. No LSAT is required and we can give you up to one year's credit for the work you did on your LLB so that you can complete your JD in as little as two years. More info on our website.

I have to add that we currently have two UPenn LLM graduates who are now doing our Global Access JD. One did her UG degree at Sciences Po (Paris) and the other at Peking Univ (Beijing). QED

Leslie A. Friedman
Director, Dean's Office

Thomas R. Kline School of Law
Drexel University
3320 Market Street, Suite 452
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215.571.4729 | Fax: 215.571.4763
drexel.edu/law

Skype: leslieafriedman

[Edited by LeslieAFriedman on Aug 18, 2016]

If you are intent on working in the U.S., you really will need a JD degree. At Drexel, we offer what we call the Global Access JD for students who have an LLB (or even an LLM) from outside the U.S. No LSAT is required and we can give you up to one year's credit for the work you did on your LLB so that you can complete your JD in as little as two years. More info on our website.

I have to add that we currently have two UPenn LLM graduates who are now doing our Global Access JD. One did her UG degree at Sciences Po (Paris) and the other at Peking Univ (Beijing). QED

Leslie A. Friedman
Director, Dean's Office

Thomas R. Kline School of Law
Drexel University
3320 Market Street, Suite 452
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215.571.4729 | Fax: 215.571.4763
drexel.edu/law

Skype: leslieafriedman
quote
Schatz
I can only second this. Unless you speak an interesting language (such as Portuguese or Chinese) or you already have a wealthy client base, your chances of finding a job in a law firm or a consulting company in the US will be limited to non-existent. Finding a job in house is generally easier, but no easy feat nonetheless.


Hi, what do you mean about interesting language? I'm a brasilian lawyer and I was planning to apply for LLM, but now I am changing my mind to JD.


From what I have seen, Brazilian lawyers with good credentials have among the best chances of finding a job with a law firm after completing an LL.M. because US firms (especially Big Law) often advise clients with interests in Brazil in many fields. I had several Brazilian colleagues who secured a job even before the official job fairs took place.

That said, it all depends on your credentials and profile of course. If you plan on staying in the US for more than just a year and you can afford it, a JD is clearly the better choice than an LL.M.

[Edited by Schatz on Aug 19, 2016]

[quote][quote]I can only second this. Unless you speak an interesting language (such as Portuguese or Chinese) or you already have a wealthy client base, your chances of finding a job in a law firm or a consulting company in the US will be limited to non-existent. Finding a job in house is generally easier, but no easy feat nonetheless.[/quote]

Hi, what do you mean about interesting language? I'm a brasilian lawyer and I was planning to apply for LLM, but now I am changing my mind to JD. [/quote]

From what I have seen, Brazilian lawyers with good credentials have among the best chances of finding a job with a law firm after completing an LL.M. because US firms (especially Big Law) often advise clients with interests in Brazil in many fields. I had several Brazilian colleagues who secured a job even before the official job fairs took place.

That said, it all depends on your credentials and profile of course. If you plan on staying in the US for more than just a year and you can afford it, a JD is clearly the better choice than an LL.M.
quote

That said, it all depends on your credentials and profile of course. If you plan on staying in the US for more than just a year and you can afford it, a JD is clearly the better choice than an LL.M.


Agree 100%
[quote]
That said, it all depends on your credentials and profile of course. If you plan on staying in the US for more than just a year and you can afford it, a JD is clearly the better choice than an LL.M.[/quote]

Agree 100%
quote
I think that you will have a very hard time finding a job in the US unless you can bring some kind of work with you, or have contacts in India that can supply work. You might be able to find a job in house or with a consulting company, but not likely a US law firm. Have fun in the LLM program, but plan to head home afterwards. Sorry.


Lol I bet you are voting for Trump


Lmao I agree!


That's nonsense. Telling the truth is not something that puts voiceofreason under suspicion to vote for this guy.


At least someone has some sense.


Being a recently graduated LLM student seeking a position in the US, I have to agree with Voice of Reason. It is not easy. The Universities also prefer that you go home so they can amplify their alumni network and extend their participation in other countries. The reality is that the LLM courses are usually a way of getting money to invest in the JD programs. So, my advice for those who want to stay in the US is: do the JD. However, if you want to go back to your home country, the LLM is a great option.


Hi, I've just completed llm from India. So should i go for JD? What is the duration? And what if i take up paralegal program, would finding work still be as difficult?
[quote]<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I think that you will have a very hard time finding a job in the US unless you can bring some kind of work with you, or have contacts in India that can supply work. You might be able to find a job in house or with a consulting company, but not likely a US law firm. Have fun in the LLM program, but plan to head home afterwards. Sorry. </blockquote>

Lol I bet you are voting for Trump </blockquote>

Lmao I agree!</blockquote>

That's nonsense. Telling the truth is not something that puts voiceofreason under suspicion to vote for this guy.</blockquote>

At least someone has some sense.</blockquote>

Being a recently graduated LLM student seeking a position in the US, I have to agree with Voice of Reason. It is not easy. The Universities also prefer that you go home so they can amplify their alumni network and extend their participation in other countries. The reality is that the LLM courses are usually a way of getting money to invest in the JD programs. So, my advice for those who want to stay in the US is: do the JD. However, if you want to go back to your home country, the LLM is a great option.[/quote]

Hi, I've just completed llm from India. So should i go for JD? What is the duration? And what if i take up paralegal program, would finding work still be as difficult?
quote
I think that you will have a very hard time finding a job in the US unless you can bring some kind of work with you, or have contacts in India that can supply work. You might be able to find a job in house or with a consulting company, but not likely a US law firm. Have fun in the LLM program, but plan to head home afterwards. Sorry.


Lol I bet you are voting for Trump


Lmao I agree!


That's nonsense. Telling the truth is not something that puts voiceofreason under suspicion to vote for this guy.


At least someone has some sense.


Being a recently graduated LLM student seeking a position in the US, I have to agree with Voice of Reason. It is not easy. The Universities also prefer that you go home so they can amplify their alumni network and extend their participation in other countries. The reality is that the LLM courses are usually a way of getting money to invest in the JD programs. So, my advice for those who want to stay in the US is: do the JD. However, if you want to go back to your home country, the LLM is a great option.


Hi, I've just completed llm from India. So should i go for JD? What is the duration? And what if i take up paralegal program, would finding work still be as difficult?


Hi,every one !! I have recently completed LLB 2016 from India. prior to this I have done B.E Electrical,MBA Marketing..as well. Should I go for LLM or JD ?? however by looking others opinion about LLM (in U.S),students facing hard time for finding job in that case can my indian educational degree and work ex. help to find a job in other field ??
[quote][quote]<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>I think that you will have a very hard time finding a job in the US unless you can bring some kind of work with you, or have contacts in India that can supply work. You might be able to find a job in house or with a consulting company, but not likely a US law firm. Have fun in the LLM program, but plan to head home afterwards. Sorry. </blockquote>

Lol I bet you are voting for Trump </blockquote>

Lmao I agree!</blockquote>

That's nonsense. Telling the truth is not something that puts voiceofreason under suspicion to vote for this guy.</blockquote>

At least someone has some sense.</blockquote>

Being a recently graduated LLM student seeking a position in the US, I have to agree with Voice of Reason. It is not easy. The Universities also prefer that you go home so they can amplify their alumni network and extend their participation in other countries. The reality is that the LLM courses are usually a way of getting money to invest in the JD programs. So, my advice for those who want to stay in the US is: do the JD. However, if you want to go back to your home country, the LLM is a great option.[/quote]

Hi, I've just completed llm from India. So should i go for JD? What is the duration? And what if i take up paralegal program, would finding work still be as difficult?[/quote]

Hi,every one !! I have recently completed LLB 2016 from India. prior to this I have done B.E Electrical,MBA Marketing..as well. Should I go for LLM or JD ?? however by looking others opinion about LLM (in U.S),students facing hard time for finding job in that case can my indian educational degree and work ex. help to find a job in other field ??
quote
nats
If your only goal is to work in an US law firm, go for a JD degree, since, although not impossible, being hired as an LL.M. is difficult and you should not take it for granted. It is important to consider other career options available for LL.M.s apart from working in a US lawfirm and returning to your home country. I know former LL.M.s who are successful lawyers in companies, banks and investment funds, not only in the US, but also in Europe and other financial centres such as Seul and Singapore.
My personal advise is to start sending résumés, making contacts, etc. prior to the job fair. Additionally, although a top University will always count in your favor, you should figure out what else you have to offer (since there are more students in the top schools than available positions). My example: I worked as compliance lawyer in my country and our "FCPA" has just been approved. It raised the attention of the compliance practices of Cravath, Swaine & Moore and other 3 law firms that sent me offers.
I hope this is helpful!



Hey FCV,

I am also applying. I have done my LLB from India and now I have started my applications for various universities. If you could please help me out a little and tell me. Whether you took a general LLM for a specialised LLM. Furthermore, I am planning to take up loan and come. So do u think i will be able to repay by acquiring a job just like you did. And are these companies helping in anyway in visa conversion.

Please reply.

Thanks.
[quote]If your only goal is to work in an US law firm, go for a JD degree, since, although not impossible, being hired as an LL.M. is difficult and you should not take it for granted. It is important to consider other career options available for LL.M.s apart from working in a US lawfirm and returning to your home country. I know former LL.M.s who are successful lawyers in companies, banks and investment funds, not only in the US, but also in Europe and other financial centres such as Seul and Singapore.
My personal advise is to start sending résumés, making contacts, etc. prior to the job fair. Additionally, although a top University will always count in your favor, you should figure out what else you have to offer (since there are more students in the top schools than available positions). My example: I worked as compliance lawyer in my country and our "FCPA" has just been approved. It raised the attention of the compliance practices of Cravath, Swaine & Moore and other 3 law firms that sent me offers.
I hope this is helpful![/quote]


Hey FCV,

I am also applying. I have done my LLB from India and now I have started my applications for various universities. If you could please help me out a little and tell me. Whether you took a general LLM for a specialised LLM. Furthermore, I am planning to take up loan and come. So do u think i will be able to repay by acquiring a job just like you did. And are these companies helping in anyway in visa conversion.

Please reply.

Thanks.
quote
M.Alumni
These are my "two cents" on this matter: most people on this website keep saying that it is very hard, if not almost impossible, to land a job with an LL.M., especially if you require sponsorship - and particularly if you read posts of 2008-2010, when the recession was at its peak.

I myself was wondering whether if was possible at all - and after trying, I found out it is. There are so many factors to be taken into consideration that a single post can't possibly be enough, but I will say that when I did mine, we were 16 LL.M.s among approx. 250 JDs, taking the same classes and being graded within the same curve, which is not usual.

Of 16, 5 required sponsorship, the other 11 were already living here - and to date I only know of 1 out of the 5 who left, as she had another offer outside the US and didn't even bother trying. The others made it and, actually, went through different offers, some of which within law firms (like me). Now, as an attorney, the LL.M. is the "ticket to enter the system", which means you have to target the right market (State, City, community, industry and type/size of law firm or company) at the right moment, based on your profile - which is indeed very challenging. The more experience, languages and skills on your side, the better - Americans, especially those who graduate from good colleges, are strong and very motivated competitors.

Many talk about top-tier law schools and large firms. That is only one of the many realities out there, the very top. Small to mid-size firms might be interested in multilingual/multi-state/country licensed attorneys with international experience, possibly in more than one country. Passing a US Bar is also crucial, and once you do pass it, the difference between you as an LL.M. graduate product and a JD product partially goes away, especially after a few years of experience. Some of those I mentioned before did not take any bar exam and, rather, continued their in-house career with subsidiary companies (or competitors) where they were working before coming to the US.

Example: if you are fluent in Spanish and Portuguese (and obviously MASTER the English language when you speak and write), have some years of experience with the "big 4" doing Tax law or with Banks doing compliance in Latin America, then come to Miami and target firms (either law firms or companies seeking in-house counsels) dealing with that market/client-type, then you will probably find some room. Sponsorship is a huge hurdle, but can be accomplished if you find the right spot.

I see this every year, plus those who are residents or citizens can only have their opportunities improving by the dozens with an LL.M.. The JD is always a great option, if you can afford it money&time-wise, as it will open your doors to all the State bar exams. Keep in mind that once you pass, let's say, the NY bar, then other States will allow you to take their bar (some require another US Bar on top of your LL.M., without a JD; others have reciprocity rules).

With regard to preparation, I would like to point out that LL.M. programs cover approximately 30% of the material of a full JD, and students need to fill the remaining 70% by themselves to pass a Bar, usually with a Bar-prep program. When they pass it, they have shown not only that they know as much as average JD graduates do, but that they were able to prepare all this in a matter of weeks or months, mostly on their own, versus 3 full years.

Take this as a first-hand insight and read it together with the big picture, I am sure others who have similar experiences would readily confirm although once you are on the field, you don't usually come back here to post (hence my contribute to your research).
These are my "two cents" on this matter: most people on this website keep saying that it is very hard, if not almost impossible, to land a job with an LL.M., especially if you require sponsorship - and particularly if you read posts of 2008-2010, when the recession was at its peak.

I myself was wondering whether if was possible at all - and after trying, I found out it is. There are so many factors to be taken into consideration that a single post can't possibly be enough, but I will say that when I did mine, we were 16 LL.M.s among approx. 250 JDs, taking the same classes and being graded within the same curve, which is not usual.

Of 16, 5 required sponsorship, the other 11 were already living here - and to date I only know of 1 out of the 5 who left, as she had another offer outside the US and didn't even bother trying. The others made it and, actually, went through different offers, some of which within law firms (like me). Now, as an attorney, the LL.M. is the "ticket to enter the system", which means you have to target the right market (State, City, community, industry and type/size of law firm or company) at the right moment, based on your profile - which is indeed very challenging. The more experience, languages and skills on your side, the better - Americans, especially those who graduate from good colleges, are strong and very motivated competitors.

Many talk about top-tier law schools and large firms. That is only one of the many realities out there, the very top. Small to mid-size firms might be interested in multilingual/multi-state/country licensed attorneys with international experience, possibly in more than one country. Passing a US Bar is also crucial, and once you do pass it, the difference between you as an LL.M. graduate product and a JD product partially goes away, especially after a few years of experience. Some of those I mentioned before did not take any bar exam and, rather, continued their in-house career with subsidiary companies (or competitors) where they were working before coming to the US.

Example: if you are fluent in Spanish and Portuguese (and obviously MASTER the English language when you speak and write), have some years of experience with the "big 4" doing Tax law or with Banks doing compliance in Latin America, then come to Miami and target firms (either law firms or companies seeking in-house counsels) dealing with that market/client-type, then you will probably find some room. Sponsorship is a huge hurdle, but can be accomplished if you find the right spot.

I see this every year, plus those who are residents or citizens can only have their opportunities improving by the dozens with an LL.M.. The JD is always a great option, if you can afford it money&time-wise, as it will open your doors to all the State bar exams. Keep in mind that once you pass, let's say, the NY bar, then other States will allow you to take their bar (some require another US Bar on top of your LL.M., without a JD; others have reciprocity rules).

With regard to preparation, I would like to point out that LL.M. programs cover approximately 30% of the material of a full JD, and students need to fill the remaining 70% by themselves to pass a Bar, usually with a Bar-prep program. When they pass it, they have shown not only that they know as much as average JD graduates do, but that they were able to prepare all this in a matter of weeks or months, mostly on their own, versus 3 full years.

Take this as a first-hand insight and read it together with the big picture, I am sure others who have similar experiences would readily confirm although once you are on the field, you don't usually come back here to post (hence my contribute to your research).
quote
Hi! Thank you for writing this post it is so encouraging for foreign law graduates like myself trying to start a career from scratch in the US! I’s a resident so don’t need a sponsorship but I was still struggling to land a job in the city of Chicago with my LLB and 6 years of PQE! I was trying to do my JD since I was constantly told LLM is useless and a waste of money! but then I realised I don’t want to Commit to so much loan and time without testing the waters! So now I have decided to do my masters and have gotten into USC Gould which seems really good right now as they offer a good program and seems like they would prepare me better for the CA bar exam ..than Northwestern ( where I’m waitlisted).
Thanks for your insight!
Hi! Thank you for writing this post it is so encouraging for foreign law graduates like myself trying to start a career from scratch in the US! I’s a resident so don’t need a sponsorship but I was still struggling to land a job in the city of Chicago with my LLB and 6 years of PQE! I was trying to do my JD since I was constantly told LLM is useless and a waste of money! but then I realised I don’t want to Commit to so much loan and time without testing the waters! So now I have decided to do my masters and have gotten into USC Gould which seems really good right now as they offer a good program and seems like they would prepare me better for the CA bar exam ..than Northwestern ( where I’m waitlisted).
Thanks for your insight!
quote
M.Alumni
Hi! Thank you for writing this post it is so encouraging for foreign law graduates like myself trying to start a career from scratch in the US! I’s a resident so don’t need a sponsorship but I was still struggling to land a job in the city of Chicago with my LLB and 6 years of PQE! I was trying to do my JD since I was constantly told LLM is useless and a waste of money! but then I realised I don’t want to Commit to so much loan and time without testing the waters! So now I have decided to do my masters and have gotten into USC Gould which seems really good right now as they offer a good program and seems like they would prepare me better for the CA bar exam ..than Northwestern ( where I’m waitlisted).
Thanks for your insight!


Hi there, thanks for your follow-up comment. I am not sure in IL you can sit for the bar with an LL.M. plus a "foreign-JD equivalent" , which in your case is an LLB. Without the bar you miss an important 'key' to most opportunities (within law firms), although some might need your foreign expertise to deal with a given portfolio and you might be able to register as a foreign counsel in your State to do so.

With regard to LL.M. feedbacks, I believe those are more "while in law school" considerations. I have to say that I've always seen attorneys asking where I graduated and whether I was already licensed during job interviews, and most of the focus goes on where you studied (and if you, for example, graduated valedictorian, or in the top 25%, or were active in the law review journal for matters related to the practice they handle, they would obviously consider that and you should elaborate on it), where you work/have worked (and types of cases you handled, courts you attended, type of product you used to prepare and overall familiarity with their system), languages you speak fluently and, eventually, professional affiliations and goals.

Have you been able to do any internships at all in local law firms? In my area, those with mid-to-small size offices are constantly looking for "young talent", meaning recent graduates in pre-bar exam stage or 2/3Ls willing to keep up with some workload for competitive salaries (2-3 months typically). If you are still studying, start looking for summer openings in advance, especially in firms where your expertise might be particularly valuable, or in companies where in-house counseling linked to your expertise might be a good match. My school was very good at introducing us on how to craft resumes and cover letter, how to look for a job, and how to advertise your skills - this is something I see as essential in this market.

For example, I would facilitate their understanding and avoid terminology which is not common here (PQE is something that makes sense in the UK as barristers and solicitors have their different systems, but is kind of out of context in the US market), and would instead focus on the type of practice and clientele you dealt with.
[quote]Hi! Thank you for writing this post it is so encouraging for foreign law graduates like myself trying to start a career from scratch in the US! I’s a resident so don’t need a sponsorship but I was still struggling to land a job in the city of Chicago with my LLB and 6 years of PQE! I was trying to do my JD since I was constantly told LLM is useless and a waste of money! but then I realised I don’t want to Commit to so much loan and time without testing the waters! So now I have decided to do my masters and have gotten into USC Gould which seems really good right now as they offer a good program and seems like they would prepare me better for the CA bar exam ..than Northwestern ( where I’m waitlisted).
Thanks for your insight! [/quote]

Hi there, thanks for your follow-up comment. I am not sure in IL you can sit for the bar with an LL.M. plus a "foreign-JD equivalent" , which in your case is an LLB. Without the bar you miss an important 'key' to most opportunities (within law firms), although some might need your foreign expertise to deal with a given portfolio and you might be able to register as a foreign counsel in your State to do so.

With regard to LL.M. feedbacks, I believe those are more "while in law school" considerations. I have to say that I've always seen attorneys asking where I graduated and whether I was already licensed during job interviews, and most of the focus goes on where you studied (and if you, for example, graduated valedictorian, or in the top 25%, or were active in the law review journal for matters related to the practice they handle, they would obviously consider that and you should elaborate on it), where you work/have worked (and types of cases you handled, courts you attended, type of product you used to prepare and overall familiarity with their system), languages you speak fluently and, eventually, professional affiliations and goals.

Have you been able to do any internships at all in local law firms? In my area, those with mid-to-small size offices are constantly looking for "young talent", meaning recent graduates in pre-bar exam stage or 2/3Ls willing to keep up with some workload for competitive salaries (2-3 months typically). If you are still studying, start looking for summer openings in advance, especially in firms where your expertise might be particularly valuable, or in companies where in-house counseling linked to your expertise might be a good match. My school was very good at introducing us on how to craft resumes and cover letter, how to look for a job, and how to advertise your skills - this is something I see as essential in this market.

For example, I would facilitate their understanding and avoid terminology which is not common here (PQE is something that makes sense in the UK as barristers and solicitors have their different systems, but is kind of out of context in the US market), and would instead focus on the type of practice and clientele you dealt with.
quote

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