3 years JD/two-years JD/LLM


Kelly14

Hello,

Since a moment I ask myself questions on Juris Doctor. Here we are, I would want to make a LLM but apparement after bar exams, there are few law firms which recruit because they prefer the JD. Then, there is a JD which lasts 2 years but there it is similar, any or almost no law firms recruit the JD of two years. Thus maybe that it is better to follow the traditional way which is the JD of 3 years. Do you think that it is better to make this JD?

I saw the program of University of Montreal about JD in common law. What do you think also ?

Thank you,

Kelly.

Hello,

Since a moment I ask myself questions on Juris Doctor. Here we are, I would want to make a LLM but apparement after bar exams, there are few law firms which recruit because they prefer the JD. Then, there is a JD which lasts 2 years but there it is similar, any or almost no law firms recruit the JD of two years. Thus maybe that it is better to follow the traditional way which is the JD of 3 years. Do you think that it is better to make this JD?

I saw the program of University of Montreal about JD in common law. What do you think also ?

Thank you,

Kelly.
quote
Tristan

Hello,

Since a moment I ask myself questions on Juris Doctor. Here we are, I would want to make a LLM but apparement after bar exams, there are few law firms which recruit because they prefer the JD. Then, there is a JD which lasts 2 years but there it is similar, any or almost no law firms recruit the JD of two years. Thus maybe that it is better to follow the traditional way which is the JD of 3 years. Do you think that it is better to make this JD?

JD is certainly preferable if your wish is to work in the private sector, i.e. at law firms. I do know big American firms that recruited LL.M. graduates, but those graduates were fluent in English, French, and at least one other major European language (and I mean perfectly fluent), in case my friend was also fluent in Mandarin, and the firms were mainly recruiting the LL.M. grads to work in their offices abroad, France, Germany, etc. They did get to spend a year at an office in New York or DC but after that off they went to Paris, Brussels, Hong Kong. In addition, they all had excellent grades, prior experience in their area of interest, and all that jazz.

It is not easy for American grads from top American JD programs to find work in the private sector in the US, so even a LL.B./J.D. from a top Canadian school like U of Toronto is not necessarily going to make you very competitive in the US market, unless you have, in addition, some other special skills, i.e. languages and experience.

I saw the program of University of Montreal about JD in common law. What do you think also ?

Thank you,

Kelly.


It depends on what your ultimate goal is. If it is to work in the private sector in the U.S., i.e. a law firm, not even a LL.B./J.D. from a top Canadian school like the U of Toronto is going to make you super competitive, unless you have something else to offer in addition, i.e. experience in your particular area of interest, fluency in several languages that are in demand.

<blockquote>Hello,

Since a moment I ask myself questions on Juris Doctor. Here we are, I would want to make a LLM but apparement after bar exams, there are few law firms which recruit because they prefer the JD. Then, there is a JD which lasts 2 years but there it is similar, any or almost no law firms recruit the JD of two years. Thus maybe that it is better to follow the traditional way which is the JD of 3 years. Do you think that it is better to make this JD?

JD is certainly preferable if your wish is to work in the private sector, i.e. at law firms. I do know big American firms that recruited LL.M. graduates, but those graduates were fluent in English, French, and at least one other major European language (and I mean perfectly fluent), in case my friend was also fluent in Mandarin, and the firms were mainly recruiting the LL.M. grads to work in their offices abroad, France, Germany, etc. They did get to spend a year at an office in New York or DC but after that off they went to Paris, Brussels, Hong Kong. In addition, they all had excellent grades, prior experience in their area of interest, and all that jazz.

It is not easy for American grads from top American JD programs to find work in the private sector in the US, so even a LL.B./J.D. from a top Canadian school like U of Toronto is not necessarily going to make you very competitive in the US market, unless you have, in addition, some other special skills, i.e. languages and experience.

I saw the program of University of Montreal about JD in common law. What do you think also ?

Thank you,

Kelly. </blockquote>

It depends on what your ultimate goal is. If it is to work in the private sector in the U.S., i.e. a law firm, not even a LL.B./J.D. from a top Canadian school like the U of Toronto is going to make you super competitive, unless you have something else to offer in addition, i.e. experience in your particular area of interest, fluency in several languages that are in demand.
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