LLM with low grades.


Hi everyone;

Im looking for a chance to apply any Int. Commercial Law programme in UK.

But my LLB grades at third class honours i think, but i have a work experience and also studying in a succesful LLM programme in my homecountry.

Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??

Thanks!
Hi everyone;

Im looking for a chance to apply any Int. Commercial Law programme in UK.

But my LLB grades at third class honours i think, but i have a work experience and also studying in a succesful LLM programme in my homecountry.

Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??

Thanks!
quote
law01
Hi everyone;

Im looking for a chance to apply any Int. Commercial Law programme in UK.

But my LLB grades at third class honours i think, but i have a work experience and also studying in a succesful LLM programme in my homecountry.

Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??

Thanks!


There are quite a few Universities accepting students with low grades i think
<blockquote>Hi everyone;

Im looking for a chance to apply any Int. Commercial Law programme in UK.

But my LLB grades at third class honours i think, but i have a work experience and also studying in a succesful LLM programme in my homecountry.

Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??

Thanks!</blockquote>

There are quite a few Universities accepting students with low grades i think
quote
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?
quote
law01
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate
<blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate
quote
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate



Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.
<blockquote><blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate</blockquote>


Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.
quote
law01
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate


Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.



That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate</blockquote>

Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd. </blockquote>


That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK

quote
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate


Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.



That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK



Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate</blockquote>

Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd. </blockquote>


That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK

</blockquote>

Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student.
quote
law01
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate


Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.



That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK



Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student.



The people i refer to are all UK/EU as am I. It is quite bizarre to be rejected by UCL but be accepted by LSE. I know quite a few people who are in this year's UCL LLM class, most of them were rejected by LSE, I even know one of them who got into UCL with a 62% average. I even know of people who have done the BPTC/LPC and have pupillage/TC with a 2:2 (one of them from a very low ranked Uni); all of them UK students. So your argument does not really stand. Also I am aware that Queen Mary, which is considered as a top 10 uni for law has the simple requirement of achieving a second class honours, while at the same time it accepts numerous students.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate</blockquote>

Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd. </blockquote>


That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK

</blockquote>

Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student. </blockquote>


The people i refer to are all UK/EU as am I. It is quite bizarre to be rejected by UCL but be accepted by LSE. I know quite a few people who are in this year's UCL LLM class, most of them were rejected by LSE, I even know one of them who got into UCL with a 62% average. I even know of people who have done the BPTC/LPC and have pupillage/TC with a 2:2 (one of them from a very low ranked Uni); all of them UK students. So your argument does not really stand. Also I am aware that Queen Mary, which is considered as a top 10 uni for law has the simple requirement of achieving a second class honours, while at the same time it accepts numerous students.
quote
Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?


I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate


Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd.



That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK



Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student.



The people i refer to are all UK/EU as am I. It is quite bizarre to be rejected by UCL but be accepted by LSE. I know quite a few people who are in this year's UCL LLM class, most of them were rejected by LSE, I even know one of them who got into UCL with a 62% average. I even know of people who have done the BPTC/LPC and have pupillage/TC with a 2:2 (one of them from a very low ranked Uni); all of them UK students. So your argument does not really stand. Also I am aware that Queen Mary, which is considered as a top 10 uni for law has the simple requirement of achieving a second class honours, while at the same time it accepts numerous students.


UCL are up there with the likes of Oxford and Cambridge. They ask for a 'high 2:1 with first class ability'. I suppose the university you graduated from plays a huge role in their decision, too. The LSE admissions team were a difficult bunch to persuade, no doubt. UCL just gave me the middle finger :( In the end, I settled for my KCL offer- a much less snobby university, but still a great one, nonetheless.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>Thanks law01 for your answer. And can u give a name which universities are they?</blockquote>

I'm not quite sure but if you have a look at some of the University rankings I assume that most of the universities outside the top 50-60 would be willing to offer a place to a third-class-graduate</blockquote>

Highly unlikely. Of course, there's no harm in trying, but he'd struggle to be accepted even with a 2:2, nevermind a 3rd. </blockquote>


That's not exactly right to be honest; first of all I know people who are doing an LLM in London, in top 40 Unis with a 3rd class degree. Further to this we should have in mind that statistically only about 6% of law graduates have a First Class degree, hence why the only Universities requiring a 1st for an LLM are Oxford and Cambridge. Then we move to LSE which requires a high 2:1; followed by UCL and King's at a 64-65% requirement. All the other top 30 Universities would accept you with a low 2:1 - 2:2; two people in my year are doing their LLM in the Uni of Manchester while having an average of no more than 56%. Most of the law graduates do an LLM with a 2:2, hence doing an LLM with a 3rd is not impossible. Someone with a 3rd will, probably not get in a top 30 Uni (but we should have in mind any work experience/mitigating circumstances/country of his degree/class rank) but he would definately be admitted in an LLM course in the UK

</blockquote>

Yeah, perhaps if you're an International Student who's paying ridiculously inflated tuition fees. I've certainly heard of students with weak 2:2s get in for their desired LLM programme, but they've only ever been International Students. With a 3rd, though? Good luck, OP.

And Law01, I was accepted by LSE but told to "do one" by UCL- I achieved a 65% overall with a 1st in my dissertation. I'm not an International student. </blockquote>


The people i refer to are all UK/EU as am I. It is quite bizarre to be rejected by UCL but be accepted by LSE. I know quite a few people who are in this year's UCL LLM class, most of them were rejected by LSE, I even know one of them who got into UCL with a 62% average. I even know of people who have done the BPTC/LPC and have pupillage/TC with a 2:2 (one of them from a very low ranked Uni); all of them UK students. So your argument does not really stand. Also I am aware that Queen Mary, which is considered as a top 10 uni for law has the simple requirement of achieving a second class honours, while at the same time it accepts numerous students.</blockquote>

UCL are up there with the likes of Oxford and Cambridge. They ask for a 'high 2:1 with first class ability'. I suppose the university you graduated from plays a huge role in their decision, too. The LSE admissions team were a difficult bunch to persuade, no doubt. UCL just gave me the middle finger :( In the end, I settled for my KCL offer- a much less snobby university, but still a great one, nonetheless.
quote
law01
Why didn't you go to LSE? I know there is not much to distinguish UCL/LSE/King's but I'm planning to reject UCL for LSE/Oxbridge.

I don't really think that the Uni you graduate plays such a big role, at least it shouldn't, as statistically it is much harder to get a 1st in a mediocre Uni than it is in a top Uni; for one simple reason, top Unis need to hand in lots of Firsts/2:1s just as a justification of the fact that they only get the 'best'.
Why didn't you go to LSE? I know there is not much to distinguish UCL/LSE/King's but I'm planning to reject UCL for LSE/Oxbridge.

I don't really think that the Uni you graduate plays such a big role, at least it shouldn't, as statistically it is much harder to get a 1st in a mediocre Uni than it is in a top Uni; for one simple reason, top Unis need to hand in lots of Firsts/2:1s just as a justification of the fact that they only get the 'best'.
quote
Why didn't you go to LSE? I know there is not much to distinguish UCL/LSE/King's but I'm planning to reject UCL for LSE/Oxbridge.

I don't really think that the Uni you graduate plays such a big role, at least it shouldn't, as statistically it is much harder to get a 1st in a mediocre Uni than it is in a top Uni; for one simple reason, top Unis need to hand in lots of Firsts/2:1s just as a justification of the fact that they only get the 'best'.


The UCL admissions team told me indirectly that the university I graduated from holds weight when making their decision to offer a student a place or not; LSE were the same. I just don't want to be among such academic snobbery. I agree with you- the university you graduate from shouldn't play such a big role, but for these top universities, it does. When visiting the KCL campus and speaking to my future lecturers, I felt the atmosphere was a lot more inclusive than that of LSE. LSE is a brilliant university, no doubt- but I think I'd be happier at King's- hence my decision to take up their offer : )
<blockquote>Why didn't you go to LSE? I know there is not much to distinguish UCL/LSE/King's but I'm planning to reject UCL for LSE/Oxbridge.

I don't really think that the Uni you graduate plays such a big role, at least it shouldn't, as statistically it is much harder to get a 1st in a mediocre Uni than it is in a top Uni; for one simple reason, top Unis need to hand in lots of Firsts/2:1s just as a justification of the fact that they only get the 'best'. </blockquote>

The UCL admissions team told me indirectly that the university I graduated from holds weight when making their decision to offer a student a place or not; LSE were the same. I just don't want to be among such academic snobbery. I agree with you- the university you graduate from shouldn't play such a big role, but for these top universities, it does. When visiting the KCL campus and speaking to my future lecturers, I felt the atmosphere was a lot more inclusive than that of LSE. LSE is a brilliant university, no doubt- but I think I'd be happier at King's- hence my decision to take up their offer : )
quote
Mark W

The UCL admissions team told me indirectly that the university I graduated from holds weight when making their decision to offer a student a place or not; LSE were the same. I just don't want to be among such academic snobbery. I agree with you- the university you graduate from shouldn't play such a big role, but for these top universities, it does. When visiting the KCL campus and speaking to my future lecturers, I felt the atmosphere was a lot more inclusive than that of LSE. LSE is a brilliant university, no doubt- but I think I'd be happier at King's- hence my decision to take up their offer : )


I don't think UCL can give much weight to which university you go to. I went to one of the worst universities in the country and got in.
<blockquote>
The UCL admissions team told me indirectly that the university I graduated from holds weight when making their decision to offer a student a place or not; LSE were the same. I just don't want to be among such academic snobbery. I agree with you- the university you graduate from shouldn't play such a big role, but for these top universities, it does. When visiting the KCL campus and speaking to my future lecturers, I felt the atmosphere was a lot more inclusive than that of LSE. LSE is a brilliant university, no doubt- but I think I'd be happier at King's- hence my decision to take up their offer : )</blockquote>

I don't think UCL can give much weight to which university you go to. I went to one of the worst universities in the country and got in.
quote
flori
Hello,


Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??


As long as you fall into the "International Student" tuition category, you will be warmly welcomed by the admission tutors at many universities...

Bye
flori
Hello,

<blockquote>
Can i take an offer from any university with these conditions in UK ??
</blockquote>

As long as you fall into the "International Student" tuition category, you will be warmly welcomed by the admission tutors at many universities...

Bye
flori
quote
I have a third class degree and I am interested in doing LPC from London. I have done an UOL external programme. Can you list the universities that will accept me with this. Please a reply would be appreciated.
I have a third class degree and I am interested in doing LPC from London. I have done an UOL external programme. Can you list the universities that will accept me with this. Please a reply would be appreciated.
quote

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