GDL/LPC in UK


Thomas82
Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas
Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas
quote
law01
Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas


Hi Thomas;

Age is certainly not an issue.
Unlike University degrees and LLMs there is no such thing as 'best place to study'. Some of the Unis offering the GDL/LPC are the following: City Uni London, BPP; University of Law; Uni of Westminster; Manchester Metropolitn.

Now in regards to job prospects; I will give you and honest and realistic view: getting a Training Contract in London with a 2:2 is quite unlikely; it could be possible to get one in smaller cities, but it would still be hard if you want to join a corporate firm. My advice would be to apply for a TC prior to doing the GDL. Firms offer two years in advance, so that successful candidates can the go and do the GDL/LPC while all of their tuition fees will be paid by the firm that has offered them the TC. That's my opinion; doing the GDL/LPC without having secured a TC first could be a waste of time and money.

Finally; I highlight that getting a TC with a 2:2 is very hard, but by no means impossible.

PS: Where are you from originally? Are you a qualified lawyer in your country?
<blockquote>Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas</blockquote>

Hi Thomas;

Age is certainly not an issue.
Unlike University degrees and LLMs there is no such thing as 'best place to study'. Some of the Unis offering the GDL/LPC are the following: City Uni London, BPP; University of Law; Uni of Westminster; Manchester Metropolitn.

Now in regards to job prospects; I will give you and honest and realistic view: getting a Training Contract in London with a 2:2 is quite unlikely; it could be possible to get one in smaller cities, but it would still be hard if you want to join a corporate firm. My advice would be to apply for a TC prior to doing the GDL. Firms offer two years in advance, so that successful candidates can the go and do the GDL/LPC while all of their tuition fees will be paid by the firm that has offered them the TC. That's my opinion; doing the GDL/LPC without having secured a TC first could be a waste of time and money.

Finally; I highlight that getting a TC with a 2:2 is very hard, but by no means impossible.

PS: Where are you from originally? Are you a qualified lawyer in your country?
quote
Thomas82
Thank you for your reply I'm Polish.
I will need the GDL / LPC to start a job in law sector in the UK.
In the Uk there is a common-law system is so diffrent. I finished law in Poland.
I also have diplomas in sociology (BA 2: 1) and (Master degree 2: 2).
I thought about this to begin with GDL, later to find some firm (TC) and then do the LPC.
After courses GDL / LPC start LLM with good results to have a chance for good work in law sector.
I read with BPP offer good career office and are helpful in finding the TC.
To answer your question I am not a qualified lawyer. Only I have completed a law degree. That is a reason I'm asking about the GDL / LPC.
Thank you for your reply I'm Polish.
I will need the GDL / LPC to start a job in law sector in the UK.
In the Uk there is a common-law system is so diffrent. I finished law in Poland.
I also have diplomas in sociology (BA 2: 1) and (Master degree 2: 2).
I thought about this to begin with GDL, later to find some firm (TC) and then do the LPC.
After courses GDL / LPC start LLM with good results to have a chance for good work in law sector.
I read with BPP offer good career office and are helpful in finding the TC.
To answer your question I am not a qualified lawyer. Only I have completed a law degree. That is a reason I'm asking about the GDL / LPC.
quote
ResIpsa24
Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas


Hi Thomas,

I'm a recent GDL graduate, so I have some insight. I hope what I say may help a little.

1) It really depends. What are of law do you want to go into? Are you looking to go into a lucrative niche area? For example, immigration? Or do you want to enter the commercial law market? What you bring to the table and where you want to go (in a professional sense) will dictate your chances. I would say, if you do not hail from a top university and/or have several years in a, say, business or banking hitting for a "magic circle" firm is not likely to bear fruit. If you are strategic about your professional direction and play to your strengths, however, it is possible that your chances are strong. But note- this is my individual speculation.

2)Your age is not important.

3)All of them do. The structure of the timetable may vary from college to college, but (as law schools are essentially businesses) they are at pains to cater to as many people as they can, so learning options are flexible.

4) For the GDL the differences between colleges are largely superficial. Have a look at the colleges that offer the GDL in the area you are going to live and go to open days/chat with a member of staff about the structure/grade weighting of the courses. For the LPC what is significant is what electives they offer. Depending on your professional area of interest, it is worth having a look at which syllabus fits with your goals. In terms of "prestige" it is total irrelevant which provider you choose.

The only thing I would add is choose wisely, talk to people who may be of use, play to your strengths and don't be seduced by flashy websites!
<blockquote>Hello,
I am interested in taking a GDL and LPC courses in the UK.
I am a graduate of law at the University of Gdansk.
I know that in order to work as a lawyer in the UK I will need the Graduate Diploma in Law. I am 32 years old, my degree (2: 2), so when I have finished the GDL / LPC would be at the age of 34-36 years.
My questions:
1, Is there a real chance of employment in the profession after the GDL and LPC courses?
2. Does my age is important?
3. What colleges offer part-time courses?
4. where is the best place to study?

best regards,
Thomas</blockquote>

Hi Thomas,

I'm a recent GDL graduate, so I have some insight. I hope what I say may help a little.

1) It really depends. What are of law do you want to go into? Are you looking to go into a lucrative niche area? For example, immigration? Or do you want to enter the commercial law market? What you bring to the table and where you want to go (in a professional sense) will dictate your chances. I would say, if you do not hail from a top university and/or have several years in a, say, business or banking hitting for a "magic circle" firm is not likely to bear fruit. If you are strategic about your professional direction and play to your strengths, however, it is possible that your chances are strong. But note- this is my individual speculation.

2)Your age is not important.

3)All of them do. The structure of the timetable may vary from college to college, but (as law schools are essentially businesses) they are at pains to cater to as many people as they can, so learning options are flexible.

4) For the GDL the differences between colleges are largely superficial. Have a look at the colleges that offer the GDL in the area you are going to live and go to open days/chat with a member of staff about the structure/grade weighting of the courses. For the LPC what is significant is what electives they offer. Depending on your professional area of interest, it is worth having a look at which syllabus fits with your goals. In terms of "prestige" it is total irrelevant which provider you choose.

The only thing I would add is choose wisely, talk to people who may be of use, play to your strengths and don't be seduced by flashy websites!
quote
Thomas82
Hello ResIpsa24,

I am interested in commercial law and corporate law.

Universities, which I am interested in:

BPP Law School
Cardiff University
The University of Law
Bristol Institute of Legal Practice
University of Westminster
The University of Law
Bristol Institute of Legal Practice
The City Law School

I know I want to do the LPC course at BPP Law School. This school has a very good reviews but I do not know what it looks like in reality.


Regards,
Thomas
Hello ResIpsa24,

I am interested in commercial law and corporate law.

Universities, which I am interested in:

BPP Law School
Cardiff University
The University of Law
Bristol Institute of Legal Practice
University of Westminster
The University of Law
Bristol Institute of Legal Practice
The City Law School

I know I want to do the LPC course at BPP Law School. This school has a very good reviews but I do not know what it looks like in reality.


Regards,
Thomas
quote
ResIpsa24
Hi Thomas,

In that case, the University of Law, Moorgate, may be best for your LPC as it is a provider of choice for a number of top corporate law firms. But phone up
admissions in each of the schools you are interested in. And of course it depends on where in the UK you want to live- for example, courses are marginally cheaper out of London.

Have you investigated whether there are any branches of firms in Poland that could sponsor your GDL/LPC?
Hi Thomas,

In that case, the University of Law, Moorgate, may be best for your LPC as it is a provider of choice for a number of top corporate law firms. But phone up
admissions in each of the schools you are interested in. And of course it depends on where in the UK you want to live- for example, courses are marginally cheaper out of London.

Have you investigated whether there are any branches of firms in Poland that could sponsor your GDL/LPC?


quote
Thomas82
Hi ResIpsa24,

Polish companies are not sponsoring courses GDL / LPC.
In Poland we have a different legal system is based on civil law (Roman legal system).
Thank you for all the information :).

Where you doing a GDL?
Do you have secure your LPC with TC?

Regards,
Thomas
Hi ResIpsa24,

Polish companies are not sponsoring courses GDL / LPC.
In Poland we have a different legal system is based on civil law (Roman legal system).
Thank you for all the information :).

Where you doing a GDL?
Do you have secure your LPC with TC?

Regards,
Thomas
quote
ResIpsa24
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.

quote
law01
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.



Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.
<blockquote>You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.

</blockquote>

Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.
quote
ResIpsa24
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.



Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.


Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.
<blockquote><blockquote>You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.

</blockquote>

Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.</blockquote>

Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.
quote
law01
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.



Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.


Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.


Hi,

You are probably the one who needs to cheer up :p The only reason I asked for your credentials is to ascertain whether your advice would be more appropriate than mine. I have 'inside' knowledge for the profession but my background is completely different from Thomas'; hence I asked about your background having in mind that if you have a similar background to Thomas (eg you are Polish as well, or hold a non-UK degree) then you would be the more appropriate person to give him advice, :) I apologize if my manner made you think that I was trying to disregard your advice, on the contrary; through arguing or laying down different views you might get something new from me and I might get something new from you :)

so cheer up buddy ;)
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.

</blockquote>

Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.</blockquote>

Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.
</blockquote>

Hi,

You are probably the one who needs to cheer up :p The only reason I asked for your credentials is to ascertain whether your advice would be more appropriate than mine. I have 'inside' knowledge for the profession but my background is completely different from Thomas'; hence I asked about your background having in mind that if you have a similar background to Thomas (eg you are Polish as well, or hold a non-UK degree) then you would be the more appropriate person to give him advice, :) I apologize if my manner made you think that I was trying to disregard your advice, on the contrary; through arguing or laying down different views you might get something new from me and I might get something new from you :)

so cheer up buddy ;)
quote
ResIpsa24
You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.



Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.


Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.


Hi,

You are probably the one who needs to cheer up :p The only reason I asked for your credentials is to ascertain whether your advice would be more appropriate than mine. I have 'inside' knowledge for the profession but my background is completely different from Thomas'; hence I asked about your background having in mind that if you have a similar background to Thomas (eg you are Polish as well, or hold a non-UK degree) then you would be the more appropriate person to give him advice, :) I apologize if my manner made you think that I was trying to disregard your advice, on the contrary; through arguing or laying down different views you might get something new from me and I might get something new from you :)

so cheer up buddy ;)


Your manner certainly made me think that. And dealing with and indeed learning from conflicting views, I hope, will one day be my professional bread and butter.

I'm afraid I learnt absolutely nothing from your post. Ominous predictions of doom, gloom and guaranteed failure seems to be a favourite topic amongst law students, and quite frankly that is not helpful. You can be pragmatic without being negative. And you can be realistic without being rude. On-line forums are frequently nothing more than wastelands for naysayers to bounce off each other and put others down. Unless we are partners, QC's or established lawyers we are all in a similar boat and not completely "qualified" to definitively say anything.

I'm afraid, despite your change of tack, I take absolutely nothing I said back. Because excessive use of smileys does not a lighthearted and reasonable person make.
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>You're welcome, Thomas :)

I did the GDL at the university of law and I don't plan on doing the LPC or going down the training contract route.

</blockquote>

Hi,

As you did not do the LPC and do not even plan to seek a TC then could you explain to us how are you so confident in your advice?

As someone with more 'inside' knowledge in the UK legal market I have to raise a caution to Thomas; I highlight that doing the GDL and then the LPC without having secured or at least have reasonable prospects of securing a TC is suicidal and a pure waste of money. Numerous candidates from top UK universities fail to secure a TC; it is extremely competitive; imagine how difficult it will be for someone who does not have a UK degree.

I do not say it's impossible, even though it is impossible to work in London with out a top first from a top University; but ven for outside London it will be very hard and extremely challenging. Doing the LPC and the GDL would cost him a lot of money; hence the most appropriate route would be to first seek for a TC and if he manages to get one then move on to do the GDL/LPC. This is the main reason why law firms, at least most of them, recruit two years in advance, because they want to give the chance to a person to secure a TC and then move on to do the GDL/LPC, as they know that spending such a huge amount of money to do the GDL/LPC without a TC is crazy.</blockquote>

Hi there,

Did you even bother to read my first post?

If you did, you may have inferred that I too was advocating a cautionary approach in Thomas's situation by way of encouraging sponsorship for the GDL and the LPC/directing his legal aspirations in a niche direction that may play to his strengths- hence giving him a better chance.

I'm sure Thomas will appreciate your "inside" knowledge and no-holds-barred realism. And it goes without saying, you are perfectly entitled to offer advice from your perspective.

What you are NOT entitled to do is disregard others opinions and experiences in a gratuitously rude manner. It's people like you that made me hesitate about joining a board like this- arrogant individuals who seem to take some type of morbid pleasure in making the legal profession out to be absolutely and utterly impenetrable.

And to answer the private message you sent me the evening before you bizarrely decided to take up the gauntlet of righteous indignation:

- As I stated in my first post- yes, I have done the GDL. I did not pay for it- thankfully a top inns of court scholarship did. This is partly why I encouraged Thomas to also seek some type of financial sponsorship.

- I went to a top UK university. Funnily enough I have also been admitted to a top US university for an LLM- despite a) not having done the LLB and b) the fact that I'm a recent law graduate.

-And there is no way on God's earth I'm telling you where I'm working at the moment. You seem like a vexatious individual with far too much time on your hands and I'm not going to give you the opportunity to even entertain the prospect of looking me up on the internet.


Thomas- if you are still keeping abreast with your thread, my initial comments still stand. It is strongly advisable that you (presuming you don't have disposable funds for the course set aside) seek some type of sponsorship or review your financial options very carefully. Do not be pulled in by flashy marketing techniques used by law schools. Always play to your strengths- your background may not suit a magic circle firm but it could, say, a thriving immigration firm with an eastern European clientèle. If this is not something you desire and you do not want to face what potentially may be an uphill struggle and/or you do not have the energy or resources to pursue a legal career in the UK, perhaps the GDL/LPC route is worth a rethink.

In short,

Thomas- be wise, remain positive!

"law01"- cheer up, petal. It's just a profession after all.
</blockquote>

Hi,

You are probably the one who needs to cheer up :p The only reason I asked for your credentials is to ascertain whether your advice would be more appropriate than mine. I have 'inside' knowledge for the profession but my background is completely different from Thomas'; hence I asked about your background having in mind that if you have a similar background to Thomas (eg you are Polish as well, or hold a non-UK degree) then you would be the more appropriate person to give him advice, :) I apologize if my manner made you think that I was trying to disregard your advice, on the contrary; through arguing or laying down different views you might get something new from me and I might get something new from you :)

so cheer up buddy ;)</blockquote>

Your manner certainly made me think that. And dealing with and indeed learning from conflicting views, I hope, will one day be my professional bread and butter.

I'm afraid I learnt absolutely nothing from your post. Ominous predictions of doom, gloom and guaranteed failure seems to be a favourite topic amongst law students, and quite frankly that is not helpful. You can be pragmatic without being negative. And you can be realistic without being rude. On-line forums are frequently nothing more than wastelands for naysayers to bounce off each other and put others down. Unless we are partners, QC's or established lawyers we are all in a similar boat and not completely "qualified" to definitively say anything.

I'm afraid, despite your change of tack, I take absolutely nothing I said back. Because excessive use of smileys does not a lighthearted and reasonable person make.
quote
Thomas82
Hi,

I read your conversation :)
I think that both eyes on the road to a legal career in the UK are helpful for me.

That's looks my plan:
1. Find a law firm for TC and then do a GDL/LPC.
2. If I can't will be start TC then do a GDL and pay self.
3. After GDL with good degree scale min. 2:1 find a TC and next do a LPC with secure TC.
4. If I can't will be start TC after GDL then I will be take a loan for LPC.
5. With GDL/LPC without TC I can start job as a parlegal or legal advisor ( I'm hope but I dont sure how looks like in reality).
6. As a parlegal/legal advisor with few years exeperience will be easier for me to find a TC. ( I'm hope that 2!)
7. After on TC and 2-3 experience start a LLM in one of UK Univeristy.

I do not know if this is reasonable but I am determined person.
I'm not going to give up after the first difficulties that arise.
I know that it will be harder for me because I am a foreigner.

Regards,
Thomas

P.S. I believe that my plan is realistic.
Hi,

I read your conversation :)
I think that both eyes on the road to a legal career in the UK are helpful for me.

That's looks my plan:
1. Find a law firm for TC and then do a GDL/LPC.
2. If I can't will be start TC then do a GDL and pay self.
3. After GDL with good degree scale min. 2:1 find a TC and next do a LPC with secure TC.
4. If I can't will be start TC after GDL then I will be take a loan for LPC.
5. With GDL/LPC without TC I can start job as a parlegal or legal advisor ( I'm hope but I dont sure how looks like in reality).
6. As a parlegal/legal advisor with few years exeperience will be easier for me to find a TC. ( I'm hope that 2!)
7. After on TC and 2-3 experience start a LLM in one of UK Univeristy.

I do not know if this is reasonable but I am determined person.
I'm not going to give up after the first difficulties that arise.
I know that it will be harder for me because I am a foreigner.

Regards,
Thomas

P.S. I believe that my plan is realistic.
quote
Thomas82
Hi again,

I know guys my plan is a long road for me :).
That's is a reason why I'm asking about my age.
I know is a hard and long way :) but I hope I can do it.
If you will have any advice for me or comments.
I would be grateful for them.


Best Regards,
Thomas
Hi again,

I know guys my plan is a long road for me :).
That's is a reason why I'm asking about my age.
I know is a hard and long way :) but I hope I can do it.
If you will have any advice for me or comments.
I would be grateful for them.


Best Regards,
Thomas
quote

Reply to Post

Related Law Schools

London, United Kingdom 74 Followers 144 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 16 Followers 14 Discussions
London, United Kingdom 52 Followers 69 Discussions
Cardiff, United Kingdom 37 Followers 66 Discussions
Bristol, United Kingdom 74 Followers 150 Discussions