Postponing LLM due to coronavirus/going for it anyway. What’s your case? IP LLM Alicante for me.


bretema

Hi everyone,

I’m considering accepting the IP LLM from Alicante University (Magister Lucentinus) and I’m wondering how will the covid situation affect to the number of students from abroad. I value a lot the possibility to engage with people from different places, and I guess this year it will be less diverse.

Have you considered postponing your LLM plans due to coronavirus? What’s your case?

Hi everyone,

I’m considering accepting the IP LLM from Alicante University (Magister Lucentinus) and I’m wondering how will the covid situation affect to the number of students from abroad. I value a lot the possibility to engage with people from different places, and I guess this year it will be less diverse.

Have you considered postponing your LLM plans due to coronavirus? What’s your case?
quote
edeep

I'll give you my opinion. I'm going to attend an LLM in Germany in WS 20/21. I think that in almost every country in Europe, Unis are planning blended programmes, that of course are not as exciting as on-site courses, but in this moment, at least at the beginning of the semester (in order to give to everyone the possibility to attend the lectures) is a forced choice. Anyway, it's beyond doubt that the programmes will have more "regional students" due to the restrictions and uncertainty, it means that the AY 21/22 will have a very crowded application path, more competitiveness and the available spots will be a fraction of the coming academic year (given the relationship btw  biigger number of applicants and available spots). So what I believe is that probably, at least at the beginning, there will be a lack of sociality, then if things will go as planned (with a vaccine, a better cure or no second waves) things will come back to normality very fast. A positive side is that if a lot of people postpone their application/admission, probably "we few" going this year will have more open job positions (1f601).
I don't know where are you from, but actually in Europe thins are going better, life is going back to normality with some limitations ( and I'm from italy, where the restrictions were the thougest in the continent) and excepting big second waves the path is to go back to normality asap. 
 

I'll give you my opinion. I'm going to attend an LLM in Germany in WS 20/21. I think that in almost every country in Europe, Unis are planning blended programmes, that of course are not as exciting as on-site courses, but in this moment, at least at the beginning of the semester (in order to give to everyone the possibility to attend the lectures) is a forced choice. Anyway, it's beyond doubt that the programmes will have more "regional students" due to the restrictions and uncertainty, it means that the AY 21/22 will have a very crowded application path, more competitiveness and the available spots will be a fraction of the coming academic year (given the relationship btw&nbsp; biigger number of applicants and available spots).&nbsp;<div>So what I believe is that probably, at least at the beginning, there will be a lack of sociality, then if things will go as planned (with a vaccine, a better cure or no second waves) things will come back to normality very fast.&nbsp;</div>A positive side is that if a lot of people postpone their application/admission, probably "we few" going this year will have more open job positions (:grin:).<br>I don't know where are you from, but actually in Europe thins are going better, life is going back to normality with some limitations ( and I'm from italy, where the restrictions were the thougest in the continent) and excepting big second waves the path is to go back to normality asap.&nbsp;<br><div>&nbsp;</div>
quote
bretema

I'll give you my opinion. I'm going to attend an LLM in Germany in WS 20/21. I think that in almost every country in Europe, Unis are planning blended programmes, that of course are not as exciting as on-site courses, but in this moment, at least at the beginning of the semester (in order to give to everyone the possibility to attend the lectures) is a forced choice. Anyway, it's beyond doubt that the programmes will have more "regional students" due to the restrictions and uncertainty, it means that the AY 21/22 will have a very crowded application path, more competitiveness and the available spots will be a fraction of the coming academic year (given the relationship btw  biigger number of applicants and available spots). So what I believe is that probably, at least at the beginning, there will be a lack of sociality, then if things will go as planned (with a vaccine, a better cure or no second waves) things will come back to normality very fast. A positive side is that if a lot of people postpone their application/admission, probably "we few" going this year will have more open job positions (1f601).
I don't know where are you from, but actually in Europe thins are going better, life is going back to normality with some limitations ( and I'm from italy, where the restrictions were the thougest in the continent) and excepting big second waves the path is to go back to normality asap. 
 


Hi edeep,

I'm actually from Spain, so unfortunately I also know well how the situation has been/is! 
I get what you say, and I've also thought that maybe this year is "easier" to have access to some LLM that in next editions will be more competitive. In my case, as I am from Spain and I'm considering also studying in Spain, the "internationalization" aspect has more importance to me, as I feel I'm opening to less oportunities abroad. But I agree with most of what you say, I guess this year has also some "advantages"!

[quote]I'll give you my opinion. I'm going to attend an LLM in Germany in WS 20/21. I think that in almost every country in Europe, Unis are planning blended programmes, that of course are not as exciting as on-site courses, but in this moment, at least at the beginning of the semester (in order to give to everyone the possibility to attend the lectures) is a forced choice. Anyway, it's beyond doubt that the programmes will have more "regional students" due to the restrictions and uncertainty, it means that the AY 21/22 will have a very crowded application path, more competitiveness and the available spots will be a fraction of the coming academic year (given the relationship btw&nbsp; biigger number of applicants and available spots).&nbsp;<div>So what I believe is that probably, at least at the beginning, there will be a lack of sociality, then if things will go as planned (with a vaccine, a better cure or no second waves) things will come back to normality very fast.&nbsp;</div>A positive side is that if a lot of people postpone their application/admission, probably "we few" going this year will have more open job positions (:grin:).<br>I don't know where are you from, but actually in Europe thins are going better, life is going back to normality with some limitations ( and I'm from italy, where the restrictions were the thougest in the continent) and excepting big second waves the path is to go back to normality asap.&nbsp;<br><div>&nbsp;</div> [/quote]<br><br>Hi edeep,<br><br>I'm actually from Spain, so unfortunately I also know well how the situation has been/is!&nbsp;<br>I get what you say, and I've also thought that maybe this year is "easier" to have access to some LLM that in next editions will be more competitive. In my case, as I am from Spain and I'm considering also studying in Spain, the "internationalization" aspect has more importance to me, as I feel I'm opening to less oportunities abroad. But I agree with most of what you say, I guess this year has also some "advantages"!
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