Requirements to practice law in AU?


guyliana
Hi Guys! I am new here but it is obviously that the discussion may be really helpful for me while taking decision to study in Australia. I am from Ukraine holding the Ukrainian Master of Laws degree. The system of education here is something very different from the Australian. Just to have an understanding, I had obtained such degree upon completion of 5-years study in one of the Ukrainian Law Universities. I have 9-years experience of legal practicing in Ukraine. So came, I decided to move to Australia. Thus, I am to enter one of the Australian Universities. Thinking about University of Adelaide and Sydney University in order to complete the LLM by coursework. But to tell the truth, I am totally confused with the requirements to start practicing law in Australia. Does LLM degree obtained in a respectable University of Australia is enough for further legal practice? Do I have to study in specific University? Do I have to obtain any additional courses upon completion of LLM degree? Would anyone be so kind to indicate the link to the site where I can find all information for international graduates willing to practice law in Australia?

Hi Guys! I am new here but it is obviously that the discussion may be really helpful for me while taking decision to study in Australia. I am from Ukraine holding the Ukrainian “Master of Laws” degree. The system of education here is something very different from the Australian. Just to have an understanding, I had obtained such degree upon completion of 5-years study in one of the Ukrainian Law Universities. I have 9-years experience of legal practicing in Ukraine. So came, I decided to move to Australia. Thus, I am to enter one of the Australian Universities. Thinking about University of Adelaide and Sydney University in order to complete the LLM by coursework. But to tell the truth, I am totally confused with the requirements to start practicing law in Australia. Does LLM degree obtained in a respectable University of Australia is enough for further legal practice? Do I have to study in specific University? Do I have to obtain any additional courses upon completion of LLM degree? Would anyone be so kind to indicate the link to the site where I can find all information for international graduates willing to practice law in Australia?
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usmanawan
Dear Guyliana,
you are from civil law jurisdiction and Australia is common law.There is substantial diffrence so you have to complete further study in australia(basic eleven courses)+Practial legal training or One year clearkship.LLM will not itself help you to get admission as lawyer.

Regards

Usman advocate
Dear Guyliana,
you are from civil law jurisdiction and Australia is common law.There is substantial diffrence so you have to complete further study in australia(basic eleven courses)+Practial legal training or One year clearkship.LLM will not itself help you to get admission as lawyer.

Regards

Usman advocate
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guyliana
Thank you very much for your reply! So as far as I understand, there is difference between admissions to practice law in the US and Australia, as in the US it is enough to obtain an LLM degree to practice law and to be employed at a good law company. Am I right? With this regard, I do not understand the purpose of LLM courses. Would you be so kind to explain their meaning to me? I have also found out the 2-year LLM courses (perhaps LLM in Business Law) - I have reviewed the subjects and realize that for a good lawyer who understands main principles this course might be enough to be employed in some private practice company. Please correct me if I am wrong.
Thank you very much for your reply! So as far as I understand, there is difference between admissions to practice law in the US and Australia, as in the US it is enough to obtain an LLM degree to practice law and to be employed at a good law company. Am I right? With this regard, I do not understand the purpose of LLM courses. Would you be so kind to explain their meaning to me? I have also found out the 2-year LLM courses (perhaps LLM in Business Law) - I have reviewed the subjects and realize that for a good lawyer who understands main principles this course might be enough to be employed in some private practice company. Please correct me if I am wrong.
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Gregor2009
Hi,

Basically, you will need to identify the Australian State you want to be admitted into. Thereafter, find out who is the assessing authority and send your qualifications to them.

It is likely that you would be required to complete majority (if not all) the subjects in a basic law degree (i.e. JD or LLB courses). I have a classmate from Russia who is exempted from the elective component of the JD program and is required to complete all compulsory courses within the program in order to gain admission.

I can assure you that the LLM would not enable you to practise in Australia. I do, however, know that universities like La Trobe do allow you to study basic law subjects under the LLM degree but the number of universities which allow you to study basic law subjects in LLM are rare. Alternatively, if you are required to complete a substantantial amount of coursework, you might want to look into completing a JD with University of Melbourne, Monash or ANU?

In regard to the practical training requirements, I am unsure what you must complete as it is based substantially on your experience etc. You might be required to undertake the whole component altogether or might be exempted - would depend on the jurisdictions well.

You might want to browse through relevant posts in the AU Forum as this issue has been enquired about several times :)

Let me know if i can help u further!


Regards
Greg
Hi,

Basically, you will need to identify the Australian State you want to be admitted into. Thereafter, find out who is the assessing authority and send your qualifications to them.

It is likely that you would be required to complete majority (if not all) the subjects in a basic law degree (i.e. JD or LLB courses). I have a classmate from Russia who is exempted from the elective component of the JD program and is required to complete all compulsory courses within the program in order to gain admission.

I can assure you that the LLM would not enable you to practise in Australia. I do, however, know that universities like La Trobe do allow you to study basic law subjects under the LLM degree but the number of universities which allow you to study basic law subjects in LLM are rare. Alternatively, if you are required to complete a substantantial amount of coursework, you might want to look into completing a JD with University of Melbourne, Monash or ANU?

In regard to the practical training requirements, I am unsure what you must complete as it is based substantially on your experience etc. You might be required to undertake the whole component altogether or might be exempted - would depend on the jurisdictions well.

You might want to browse through relevant posts in the AU Forum as this issue has been enquired about several times :)

Let me know if i can help u further!


Regards
Greg
quote
nnaghi
Ok, so I just want a clarification: I'm at law school in the U.S. right now but was thinking that I might want to get a law degree in Australia as well. How would I go about doing that? If an L.L.M degree is sufficient, that would be perfect. If not, then what exactly do I need in addition to a J.D. from a U.S. law school?
Ok, so I just want a clarification: I'm at law school in the U.S. right now but was thinking that I might want to get a law degree in Australia as well. How would I go about doing that? If an L.L.M degree is sufficient, that would be perfect. If not, then what exactly do I need in addition to a J.D. from a U.S. law school?
quote
I am from Turkey with a LLM degree and have recently applied for a law school in Melbourne, Victoria. It takes a lot of time and truck load of paperwork just to get your LLB courses in your own country to be exempted. However, it doesn't do much good unfortunately. Anyway, the answer to your question is here: http://www.lawadmissions.vic.gov.au/docs/Uniform_Principles_October_2010.pdf
According to CoLE (Council of Legal Education), the compulsory courses stated in the pdf document has to be completed. We, the civil law practitioners, need to complete almost all the undergraduate courses all over again. I was in for it, though it takes great deal of patience, dedication and money but I haven't regretted it so far. Think thoroughly before you decide.
I am from Turkey with a LLM degree and have recently applied for a law school in Melbourne, Victoria. It takes a lot of time and truck load of paperwork just to get your LLB courses in your own country to be exempted. However, it doesn't do much good unfortunately. Anyway, the answer to your question is here: http://www.lawadmissions.vic.gov.au/docs/Uniform_Principles_October_2010.pdf
According to CoLE (Council of Legal Education), the compulsory courses stated in the pdf document has to be completed. We, the civil law practitioners, need to complete almost all the undergraduate courses all over again. I was in for it, though it takes great deal of patience, dedication and money but I haven't regretted it so far. Think thoroughly before you decide.
quote
timah08
hello. I am an LLB student from Mauritius. My country operates on both a civil and common law jurisdiction. Is it possible for me to enroll in for PLT(what we call BPTC-bar practice training course) courses and exams in Australia?
thanks
hello. I am an LLB student from Mauritius. My country operates on both a civil and common law jurisdiction. Is it possible for me to enroll in for PLT(what we call BPTC-bar practice training course) courses and exams in Australia?
thanks
quote
hello. I am an LLB student from Mauritius. My country operates on both a civil and common law jurisdiction. Is it possible for me to enroll in for PLT(what we call BPTC-bar practice training course) courses and exams in Australia?
thanks


If you are an overseas applicant, you will need to get your overseas qualifications assessed by the Legal Board. After that, you will be required to complete the PLT requirements. These are the requirements to practise law in Australia. You will definitely need to sit for some additional academic subjects with your overseas LLB. And as for PLT, you may seek exemptions if you have substantial prior working experience or have pursued the LPC or BPTC in the country which your LLB was issued, in this case, Mauritius.

Hope this helps.
<blockquote>hello. I am an LLB student from Mauritius. My country operates on both a civil and common law jurisdiction. Is it possible for me to enroll in for PLT(what we call BPTC-bar practice training course) courses and exams in Australia?
thanks</blockquote>

If you are an overseas applicant, you will need to get your overseas qualifications assessed by the Legal Board. After that, you will be required to complete the PLT requirements. These are the requirements to practise law in Australia. You will definitely need to sit for some additional academic subjects with your overseas LLB. And as for PLT, you may seek exemptions if you have substantial prior working experience or have pursued the LPC or BPTC in the country which your LLB was issued, in this case, Mauritius.

Hope this helps.
quote
Slash
Hello everybody,

There is something a little unclear for me concerning the practise of law in Australia. I understand that to work as a qualified lawyer - i.e. as a barister or solicitor - one needs to undertake the appropriate academic and vocational training pointed by the board. But what about people who work in the field of law without being qualified lawyer? As a consultant, for instance. I reckon a mere LLM would be sufficient, right? I know two people coming from Europe who now works as consultants in Sydney without being qualified in Australia (one got on-the-field experience by working for a few years as a paralegal in Sydney, whereas the other one is an experienced lawyer from overseas). So it looks possible. Now my questions are: is it common? Is there a demand for foreign law experts in certain fields?

Thanks a lots for your insights,

Slash
Hello everybody,

There is something a little unclear for me concerning the practise of law in Australia. I understand that to work as a qualified lawyer - i.e. as a barister or solicitor - one needs to undertake the appropriate academic and vocational training pointed by the board. But what about people who work in the field of law without being qualified lawyer? As a consultant, for instance. I reckon a mere LLM would be sufficient, right? I know two people coming from Europe who now works as consultants in Sydney without being qualified in Australia (one got on-the-field experience by working for a few years as a paralegal in Sydney, whereas the other one is an experienced lawyer from overseas). So it looks possible. Now my questions are: is it common? Is there a demand for foreign law experts in certain fields?

Thanks a lots for your insights,

Slash
quote
barmenator

I understand that to work as a qualified lawyer - i.e. as a barister or solicitor - one needs to undertake the appropriate academic and vocational training pointed by the board. But what about people who work in the field of law without being qualified lawyer? As a consultant, for instance. I reckon a mere LLM would be sufficient, right? I know two people coming from Europe who now works as consultants in Sydney without being qualified in Australia (one got on-the-field experience by working for a few years as a paralegal in Sydney, whereas the other one is an experienced lawyer from overseas). So it looks possible. Now my questions are: is it common? Is there a demand for foreign law experts in certain fields?


There is no shortage in Australia of lawyers of any kind, since they have many well-respected universities (getting more everyday according to QS World Ranking).

Basically, as well as in the US, Canada, or any other Common Law jurisdiction, you have to start over again from scratch with an LLB or a JD. Assessment for foreign credentials is ridiculous, and consists of getting credit (as our fellow peer correctly states) just for electives.

An LLM in the US, qualifies you to sit for the bar only in California and New York. However, that is not very likely to happen since they are 2 of the toughest bar exams around.
The only straight forward way to gain admission to practice in any state the US, is to study a 3 year JD (or 2, if you get lucky). Same thing happens in Australia.

What are LLMs good for? Well, for getting some extra money out of your pocket, and making your CV look fancy. But from a practical viewpoint, they're not much different from not having them. Law practice does not require an LLM, but a first law degree instead.

If you are already studying law in the US, Ukrania, Malasya or elsewhere, my recommendation is to stay there and practice. Otherwise, be prepared to spend $ on getting your first degree all over again. Unfortunately, law is a domestic practice everywhere (as much as I would love to change this).
<blockquote>
I understand that to work as a qualified lawyer - i.e. as a barister or solicitor - one needs to undertake the appropriate academic and vocational training pointed by the board. But what about people who work in the field of law without being qualified lawyer? As a consultant, for instance. I reckon a mere LLM would be sufficient, right? I know two people coming from Europe who now works as consultants in Sydney without being qualified in Australia (one got on-the-field experience by working for a few years as a paralegal in Sydney, whereas the other one is an experienced lawyer from overseas). So it looks possible. Now my questions are: is it common? Is there a demand for foreign law experts in certain fields?
</blockquote>

There is no shortage in Australia of lawyers of any kind, since they have many well-respected universities (getting more everyday according to QS World Ranking).

Basically, as well as in the US, Canada, or any other Common Law jurisdiction, you have to start over again from scratch with an LLB or a JD. Assessment for foreign credentials is ridiculous, and consists of getting credit (as our fellow peer correctly states) just for electives.

An LLM in the US, qualifies you to sit for the bar only in California and New York. However, that is not very likely to happen since they are 2 of the toughest bar exams around.
The only straight forward way to gain admission to practice in any state the US, is to study a 3 year JD (or 2, if you get lucky). Same thing happens in Australia.

What are LLMs good for? Well, for getting some extra money out of your pocket, and making your CV look fancy. But from a practical viewpoint, they're not much different from not having them. Law practice does not require an LLM, but a first law degree instead.

If you are already studying law in the US, Ukrania, Malasya or elsewhere, my recommendation is to stay there and practice. Otherwise, be prepared to spend $ on getting your first degree all over again. Unfortunately, law is a domestic practice everywhere (as much as I would love to change this).
quote

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