USC Announces LL.M. in Privacy Law and Cybersecurity

One-year program to launch in the fall of 2020

The Los Angeles-based University of Southern California (USC) Gould School of Law has announced the launch of a new LL.M. program in Privacy Law and Cybersecurity.

The new program will aim to help students mitigate the risks associated with cybersecurity and related topics, and to deal with the threats that they pose.

The Cybersecurity LL.M.'s core courses cover a range of topics, including for example computer crime law, information privacy law, and intellectual property law, among others. Through elective courses,  students will also be able to explore subjects like national security law, global regulatory compliance, and patent law.

USC's new Privacy Law and Cybersecurity LL.M. is set to launch in the fall of 2020. To apply for the program, potential candidates should have a JD or an LLB. Applicants need to also submit a personal statement, a CV, transcripts, and degree verifications. Those who are not US citizens or permanent residents will also need to take the TOEFL or the IELTS.

Cybersecurity is a hot topic at many law schools, and there are a number of new programs in this space.

For more information, please see USC's LL.M. in Privacy Law and Cybersecurity program webpage. 

You can also learn more about the law school and its LL.M. offerings on USC's Full Profile at LLM GUIDE.

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