Chicago 2015


grumpyJD

Just reaching out through cyberspace to my fellow applicants to Chicago 2015. Based on the profile views, it seems like Chicago isn't as popular as some other programs that are ranked much lower. Am I missing something? I can't see any other program (except Yale and I reckon that's an even more remote possibility) that offers what Chicago does. The more I read, the more I want to attend...Well, I just hope that work will keep me distracted during the long wait for a decision. Best of luck to everyone this cycle!

Just reaching out through cyberspace to my fellow applicants to Chicago 2015. Based on the profile views, it seems like Chicago isn't as popular as some other programs that are ranked much lower. Am I missing something? I can't see any other program (except Yale and I reckon that's an even more remote possibility) that offers what Chicago does. The more I read, the more I want to attend...Well, I just hope that work will keep me distracted during the long wait for a decision. Best of luck to everyone this cycle!
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Kitty-Su

I was really interested in Chicago as well however it seems that they only want candidates with substantial experience. Perhaps that's the reason.

I was really interested in Chicago as well however it seems that they only want candidates with substantial experience. Perhaps that's the reason.
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grumpyJD

Maybe..That didn't discourage me because I have a fair bit of work experience. Although, Columbia also asks for work experience and seems to be among the most popular on these boards.

Maybe..That didn't discourage me because I have a fair bit of work experience. Although, Columbia also asks for work experience and seems to be among the most popular on these boards.
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Jack13

I was really interested in Chicago as well however it seems that they only want candidates with substantial experience. Perhaps that's the reason.


As far as I know, this is not true. I have a couple friends who were admitted to Chicago with no work experience.

<blockquote>I was really interested in Chicago as well however it seems that they only want candidates with substantial experience. Perhaps that's the reason.</blockquote>

As far as I know, this is not true. I have a couple friends who were admitted to Chicago with no work experience.
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grumpyJD

Thanks for sharing that, Jack13. Chicago seemed much more academic than professional (like Yale which is what attracted me). I didn't remember anything about work experience but I wouldn't have paid attention to that part because it's probably the stronger part of my application.

Thanks for sharing that, Jack13. Chicago seemed much more academic than professional (like Yale which is what attracted me). I didn't remember anything about work experience but I wouldn't have paid attention to that part because it's probably the stronger part of my application.
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Jack13

Thanks for sharing that, Jack13. Chicago seemed much more academic than professional (like Yale which is what attracted me). I didn't remember anything about work experience but I wouldn't have paid attention to that part because it's probably the stronger part of my application.


Generally speaking, except for Yale and Harvard, my impression is that if you are a very strong candidate, you can well receive an admission offer while in your last year of law school.

<blockquote>Thanks for sharing that, Jack13. Chicago seemed much more academic than professional (like Yale which is what attracted me). I didn't remember anything about work experience but I wouldn't have paid attention to that part because it's probably the stronger part of my application. </blockquote>

Generally speaking, except for Yale and Harvard, my impression is that if you are a very strong candidate, you can well receive an admission offer while in your last year of law school.
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grumpyJD

That sounds encouraging. I'm including a judicial clerkship as 'work experience' but I know some people might discount that since it doesn't involve advocacy. Fingers crossed!

That sounds encouraging. I'm including a judicial clerkship as 'work experience' but I know some people might discount that since it doesn't involve advocacy. Fingers crossed!
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Jack13

That sounds encouraging. I'm including a judicial clerkship as 'work experience' but I know some people might discount that since it doesn't involve advocacy. Fingers crossed!


In the US, several law graduates clerk for 1 or 2 years before applying for a position in a law firm. I would consider your clerkship a valuable experience.

<blockquote>That sounds encouraging. I'm including a judicial clerkship as 'work experience' but I know some people might discount that since it doesn't involve advocacy. Fingers crossed!</blockquote>

In the US, several law graduates clerk for 1 or 2 years before applying for a position in a law firm. I would consider your clerkship a valuable experience.
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Paloma88

Do you guys know how Chicago and Northwestern differ in their approach to the LLM.

Thank you

Do you guys know how Chicago and Northwestern differ in their approach to the LLM.

Thank you
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grumpyJD

Jack, I hope you're right. Getting into a clerkship is very competitive but employers have different ideas about how useful it is. I hear that law schools value a clerkship and I really hope that's the case.

Paloma- I don't know anything about Northwestern's LLM and I didn't apply to it. Have you checked their website?

Jack, I hope you're right. Getting into a clerkship is very competitive but employers have different ideas about how useful it is. I hear that law schools value a clerkship and I really hope that's the case.

Paloma- I don't know anything about Northwestern's LLM and I didn't apply to it. Have you checked their website?
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Kats_K

Jack13, are the clerkhsips undertaken during the academic year (unpaid) of much significance to the Admissions Committees?

Jack13, are the clerkhsips undertaken during the academic year (unpaid) of much significance to the Admissions Committees?
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Jack13

Jack13, are the clerkhsips undertaken during the academic year (unpaid) of much significance to the Admissions Committees?


Why would you mention they were unpaid? :)

<blockquote>Jack13, are the clerkhsips undertaken during the academic year (unpaid) of much significance to the Admissions Committees? </blockquote>

Why would you mention they were unpaid? :)
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grumpyJD

I wonder what you mean by "clerkships undertaken during the academic year". Maybe we are using the same word to describe two different things. When I speak of a judicial clerkship, I am referring to full-time employment in judges' chambers under the supervision of one judge. I was conducting legal research and providing legal counsel to the judge.

I wonder what you mean by "clerkships undertaken during the academic year". Maybe we are using the same word to describe two different things. When I speak of a judicial clerkship, I am referring to full-time employment in judges' chambers under the supervision of one judge. I was conducting legal research and providing legal counsel to the judge.
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Kats_K

Jack13, I definitely won't be mentioning 'unpaid' in my resume :)
I basically wanted to emphasise on the fact that for me this clerkship was more like an internship as a law student and not a work experience after graduation. I'm trying to finalise my resume and I'm wondering if i should bump this clerkship above my TAship if the admissions committee finds the former more interesting.

Jack13, I definitely won't be mentioning 'unpaid' in my resume :)
I basically wanted to emphasise on the fact that for me this clerkship was more like an internship as a law student and not a work experience after graduation. I'm trying to finalise my resume and I'm wondering if i should bump this clerkship above my TAship if the admissions committee finds the former more interesting.
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Kats_K

I wonder what you mean by "clerkships undertaken during the academic year". Maybe we are using the same word to describe two different things. When I speak of a judicial clerkship, I am referring to full-time employment in judges' chambers under the supervision of one judge. I was conducting legal research and providing legal counsel to the judge.


Hi! In my time, the judicial clerkships could be taken both as internships during one's law course and as a full-time employment after graduation. In both cases, it involved working with a single judge, briefing him, researching on pending cases etc. Of course the clerk's involvement in the latter case was deeper, he most often being a qualified advocate and not a student. But the selection process was competitive in both cases.

<blockquote>I wonder what you mean by "clerkships undertaken during the academic year". Maybe we are using the same word to describe two different things. When I speak of a judicial clerkship, I am referring to full-time employment in judges' chambers under the supervision of one judge. I was conducting legal research and providing legal counsel to the judge. </blockquote>

Hi! In my time, the judicial clerkships could be taken both as internships during one's law course and as a full-time employment after graduation. In both cases, it involved working with a single judge, briefing him, researching on pending cases etc. Of course the clerk's involvement in the latter case was deeper, he most often being a qualified advocate and not a student. But the selection process was competitive in both cases.
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grumpyJD

Hi again...I'm sure it was a great experience but that sounds a bit different from the situation over here. Well, I'm sure it's different in every country so I will tell you what it means over here...Clerkships in Canada require a law degree so you can't start a clerkship until after you've graduated law school. Usually you apply in 2L and start within a few months after graduation. The selection process is very thorough- these are government jobs and there is a LOT of competition. You need to submit multiple writing samples, transcripts, and several academic references. If you're lucky, you get called for an interview. Some of the judges prefer informal interviews but a lot of them will ask substantive legal questions. The vetting is intense. You are hired as an employee of the Solicitor General. Clerkship salaries are lower than private practice, but clerkships here are always paid. Good luck with your application!

Hi again...I'm sure it was a great experience but that sounds a bit different from the situation over here. Well, I'm sure it's different in every country so I will tell you what it means over here...Clerkships in Canada require a law degree so you can't start a clerkship until after you've graduated law school. Usually you apply in 2L and start within a few months after graduation. The selection process is very thorough- these are government jobs and there is a LOT of competition. You need to submit multiple writing samples, transcripts, and several academic references. If you're lucky, you get called for an interview. Some of the judges prefer informal interviews but a lot of them will ask substantive legal questions. The vetting is intense. You are hired as an employee of the Solicitor General. Clerkship salaries are lower than private practice, but clerkships here are always paid. Good luck with your application!
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BlackLLM

As someone doing my LLM in UChicago, here are a couple of things which you all should know about the University and this beautiful city. These are the pointers which truly helped me in sealing my decision to come here instead of other law schools. Hope you find this helpful!
1) Size: the program at other universities are several times the size of the LLM class at UChicago. The Law School itself is smaller than any other comparable law schools at other universities, and that means that you literally know everybody. This is not only good for networking and friendship reasons, but also because the School can offer a number of things that would be impossible to have in larger schools. Let me give you an example. There are seminars here for which students go to class to professors' homes. These include attending classes at Judge Richard Posner's and Martha Nussbaum's houses (there are many professors doing the same thing) with a group of no more than 14 students. Imagine drink a glass of wine while you discuss the readings. Therefore, the connection and proximity with professors and other students is simply amazing.
2) Faculty: Chicago has an amazing group of professors. The same can be probably be said about other top 10 schools, but depending on the subjects, Chicago is really strong. I am thinking about topics like Con Law, Comparative Law, Torts, Antitrust, Contracts, Public Choice, Judicial Behavior, and of course, it is the very cradle of Economic Analysis of Law (will discuss further). Professors like Posner, Easterbrook, Landes, Epstein, Baird, Picker, Ginsburg, to name just a few, are frontrunners in their respective fields, and in the case of those still in the bench at the 7th Circuit (Posner, Easterbrook and also Wood) they have re-shaped the legal landscape in the US with their widely cited decisions and rationale.
3) Law & Econ: Most people come for the love of, or developing an interest in Economic Analysis of Law. This is the cradle of law & economics and here at Chicago you will be getting a set of tools that will help you get a fresh and very useful approach to legal issues, without prejudice to whatever normative standpoints you already have. A good balance of classic courses and a couple of basic courses on Economic Analysis of Law will change the way you approach law to your benefit. And if you already have a background on Law & Econ, you can go for the more advanced courses both at the Law School and by registering at the Econ Department, a feature that works for all other schools within the University.
4) Cost: Living in Chicago is way cheaper than options like NYC. Here in Chicago you don't need to buy a car. Public transportation works really well, and if you live within the Campus area, you have free transportation 24hs a day. Food is cheaper, utilities are cheaper. A good way to compare these things is by using this calculator by CNN. money.cnn.com/calculator/pf/cost-of-living/ You can compare the cost of living in different cities. You will see what I mean.
5) Chicago: There's amazing classical music, jazz music architecture, sports, food...the list is endless. One can attend Chicago Symphony concerts, the best orchestra in the U.S., for just 15 dollars (student tickets). Chicago is literally the world capital for architecture. When you get to Chicago you realize why is that. The skyline, the lake, the river, everything is amazingly beautiful, even with the snow! You also have great blues and jazz clubs, really good theater, and the broadway shows that come here all the time. Add to the list the Chicago Bulls, the Bears and the current champions of the Hockey League, the Blackhawks, and the combo is complete.
Ok, as you can see, I am really a fan of the city, the University and the Law School. But for a reason. Please feel free to ask anything questions. Also, the admission process is not restricted to people with work experience, there are many students in my class who have come right after finishing their undergrad in law. So, to those who applied, good luck for the admission.

As someone doing my LLM in UChicago, here are a couple of things which you all should know about the University and this beautiful city. These are the pointers which truly helped me in sealing my decision to come here instead of other law schools. Hope you find this helpful!
1) Size: the program at other universities are several times the size of the LLM class at UChicago. The Law School itself is smaller than any other comparable law schools at other universities, and that means that you literally know everybody. This is not only good for networking and friendship reasons, but also because the School can offer a number of things that would be impossible to have in larger schools. Let me give you an example. There are seminars here for which students go to class to professors' homes. These include attending classes at Judge Richard Posner's and Martha Nussbaum's houses (there are many professors doing the same thing) with a group of no more than 14 students. Imagine drink a glass of wine while you discuss the readings. Therefore, the connection and proximity with professors and other students is simply amazing.
2) Faculty: Chicago has an amazing group of professors. The same can be probably be said about other top 10 schools, but depending on the subjects, Chicago is really strong. I am thinking about topics like Con Law, Comparative Law, Torts, Antitrust, Contracts, Public Choice, Judicial Behavior, and of course, it is the very cradle of Economic Analysis of Law (will discuss further). Professors like Posner, Easterbrook, Landes, Epstein, Baird, Picker, Ginsburg, to name just a few, are frontrunners in their respective fields, and in the case of those still in the bench at the 7th Circuit (Posner, Easterbrook and also Wood) they have re-shaped the legal landscape in the US with their widely cited decisions and rationale.
3) Law & Econ: Most people come for the love of, or developing an interest in Economic Analysis of Law. This is the cradle of law & economics and here at Chicago you will be getting a set of tools that will help you get a fresh and very useful approach to legal issues, without prejudice to whatever normative standpoints you already have. A good balance of classic courses and a couple of basic courses on Economic Analysis of Law will change the way you approach law to your benefit. And if you already have a background on Law & Econ, you can go for the more advanced courses both at the Law School and by registering at the Econ Department, a feature that works for all other schools within the University.
4) Cost: Living in Chicago is way cheaper than options like NYC. Here in Chicago you don't need to buy a car. Public transportation works really well, and if you live within the Campus area, you have free transportation 24hs a day. Food is cheaper, utilities are cheaper. A good way to compare these things is by using this calculator by CNN. money.cnn.com/calculator/pf/cost-of-living/ You can compare the cost of living in different cities. You will see what I mean.
5) Chicago: There's amazing classical music, jazz music architecture, sports, food...the list is endless. One can attend Chicago Symphony concerts, the best orchestra in the U.S., for just 15 dollars (student tickets). Chicago is literally the world capital for architecture. When you get to Chicago you realize why is that. The skyline, the lake, the river, everything is amazingly beautiful, even with the snow! You also have great blues and jazz clubs, really good theater, and the broadway shows that come here all the time. Add to the list the Chicago Bulls, the Bears and the current champions of the Hockey League, the Blackhawks, and the combo is complete.
Ok, as you can see, I am really a fan of the city, the University and the Law School. But for a reason. Please feel free to ask anything questions. Also, the admission process is not restricted to people with work experience, there are many students in my class who have come right after finishing their undergrad in law. So, to those who applied, good luck for the admission.
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grumpyJD

Thanks for posting this!

Thanks for posting this!
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My friends, I submitted my application to Chicago on December 16th, however The University have not sent me any confirmation until now. They said that they could take up to a week to send the acknowledgments, but nothing happened until now. Maybe it is due to the holidays or The University is not working, but I would like to ask you if somebody else have a similar issue or know what could have happened. Thank you very much for your help.

My friends, I submitted my application to Chicago on December 16th, however The University have not sent me any confirmation until now. They said that they could take up to a week to send the acknowledgments, but nothing happened until now. Maybe it is due to the holidays or The University is not working, but I would like to ask you if somebody else have a similar issue or know what could have happened. Thank you very much for your help.
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