Best JD for Foreign Attorney (2 years)


sweety123
Hi all,
Great post! I am also studying for the LSAT after my LL.M from U.S. Infact I am taking it next week. From what I know all that matters with respect to J.D is the LSAT score. I dont know how much boost an LL.M would give since most schools dont take graduate studies into consideration and only undergrad. grades are important.
Hi all,
Great post! I am also studying for the LSAT after my LL.M from U.S. Infact I am taking it next week. From what I know all that matters with respect to J.D is the LSAT score. I dont know how much boost an LL.M would give since most schools dont take graduate studies into consideration and only undergrad. grades are important.

quote
hannenyh
If anyone thinks about getting your JD online, just be mindful of this:

http://www.abanet.org/legaled/distanceeducation/distance.html
If anyone thinks about getting your JD online, just be mindful of this:

http://www.abanet.org/legaled/distanceeducation/distance.html

quote
oana_red
Hi.
I am Oana and I am a romanian lawyer.
I want to know which is the easiest way to practice in US.
I intend to live in DC or MD aria.
If you have any information, please share it with me.
Thank you
Hi.
I am Oana and I am a romanian lawyer.
I want to know which is the easiest way to practice in US.
I intend to live in DC or MD aria.
If you have any information, please share it with me.
Thank you
quote
teena9
Great post indeed! am LL.M from top 15; admitted to the NY State Bar; Permanent Resident in U.S. and have worked in a very senior position for a fortune 100 company while I was posted to my home country. I have a total work experience of over 7 years..am now seriously considering doing JD from top 5 to increase my chances of getting into one of the top law firms; Any inputs on whether JD after LL.M 1)-Would help to get into the "League"?
2)- Are schools reserved in giving admission (JD program) to "experienced" foreign educated attorneys ?
Thanks for your thoughts.
Great post indeed! am LL.M from top 15; admitted to the NY State Bar; Permanent Resident in U.S. and have worked in a very senior position for a fortune 100 company while I was posted to my home country. I have a total work experience of over 7 years..am now seriously considering doing JD from top 5 to increase my chances of getting into one of the top law firms; Any inputs on whether JD after LL.M 1)-Would help to get into the "League"?
2)- Are schools reserved in giving admission (JD program) to "experienced" foreign educated attorneys ?
Thanks for your thoughts.
quote
lex23
I know that several of the top ten schools will allow a small number of students from abroad, to apply for senior status and complete the JD in just 2 years. (separate to the 2 year specific program at NU),

Does anyone know what kind of factors they take into account to decide if you get the advanced standing? Several have told me (harvard, yale, duke) that you do NOT need to do their LLM first, but that it is rare to succeed.

As I am completing a UK masters degree next year, I wondered what else I could do to improve my chances.
Thanks.

PS. any other good schools offer 2 year JD?
I know that several of the top ten schools will allow a small number of students from abroad, to apply for senior status and complete the JD in just 2 years. (separate to the 2 year specific program at NU),

Does anyone know what kind of factors they take into account to decide if you get the advanced standing? Several have told me (harvard, yale, duke) that you do NOT need to do their LLM first, but that it is rare to succeed.

As I am completing a UK masters degree next year, I wondered what else I could do to improve my chances.
Thanks.

PS. any other good schools offer 2 year JD?
quote
aalba
I am american citizen, but I studied my Law Career in Dominican Republic, which system is Civil Law. I would like to know how are my chances for making a JD Degree in one of the top American Law School. I also would like to know what is exactly the LSAT and if I have to make pass this exam in order for me to enter to a Law School.
I am american citizen, but I studied my Law Career in Dominican Republic, which system is Civil Law. I would like to know how are my chances for making a JD Degree in one of the top American Law School. I also would like to know what is exactly the LSAT and if I have to make pass this exam in order for me to enter to a Law School.
quote
Hey, looks like we are in the same boat.....
I am also a US Citizen, who studied his Law Career in Peru.
Let me know what did you find out and if you wish you can e-mail me at moiseslopez@yahoo.com.
Hey, looks like we are in the same boat.....
I am also a US Citizen, who studied his Law Career in Peru.
Let me know what did you find out and if you wish you can e-mail me at moiseslopez@yahoo.com.
quote
aalba
moises, i tried to wright you to your email, but the message is failure. my email is anthonyalba@gmail.com. Wright to me, we can share info.
moises, i tried to wright you to your email, but the message is failure. my email is anthonyalba@gmail.com. Wright to me, we can share info.
quote
aalba
Does anyone knows if the LSAT exam is an individual test that each Law School gives to students who wants to enter to study Law in that university or is a common test that you take the dates that are scheduled for it ?
Does anyone knows if the LSAT exam is an individual test that each Law School gives to students who wants to enter to study Law in that university or is a common test that you take the dates that are scheduled for it ?
quote
york
The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) administers the LSAT four times per year, typically in June, October (occasionally administered in late September), December, and February.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test
The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) administers the LSAT four times per year, typically in June, October (occasionally administered in late September), December, and February.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_School_Admission_Test
quote
Hi All:
I am an American citizen practicing law in Belize, Central America. I have been practicing for 3 years. I would like to go and live in the United States but I am not sure about what careers await me. If I did the LLM in intellectual property, I would have to take the bar exam (I would like to live in Florida, anyone know anything about taking the bar exam there?) and hopefully I pass.....what careers are out their for me? I do not want to be a litigator.
Honestly, I am tired of studying but I can scarifice a year for studies but anymore I am not sure...

Any advice would be appreciated!
Hi All:
I am an American citizen practicing law in Belize, Central America. I have been practicing for 3 years. I would like to go and live in the United States but I am not sure about what careers await me. If I did the LLM in intellectual property, I would have to take the bar exam (I would like to live in Florida, anyone know anything about taking the bar exam there?) and hopefully I pass.....what careers are out their for me? I do not want to be a litigator.
Honestly, I am tired of studying but I can scarifice a year for studies but anymore I am not sure...

Any advice would be appreciated!
quote
confused7
I know that several of the top ten schools will allow a small number of students from abroad, to apply for senior status and complete the JD in just 2 years. (separate to the 2 year specific program at NU),

Does anyone know what kind of factors they take into account to decide if you get the advanced standing? Several have told me (harvard, yale, duke) that you do NOT need to do their LLM first, but that it is rare to succeed.

As I am completing a UK masters degree next year, I wondered what else I could do to improve my chances.
Thanks.

PS. any other good schools offer 2 year JD?


may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw
<blockquote>I know that several of the top ten schools will allow a small number of students from abroad, to apply for senior status and complete the JD in just 2 years. (separate to the 2 year specific program at NU),

Does anyone know what kind of factors they take into account to decide if you get the advanced standing? Several have told me (harvard, yale, duke) that you do NOT need to do their LLM first, but that it is rare to succeed.

As I am completing a UK masters degree next year, I wondered what else I could do to improve my chances.
Thanks.

PS. any other good schools offer 2 year JD?</blockquote>

may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw
quote
Erkan
may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw


Come on confused7, what kind of babble is that?
<blockquote>may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw</blockquote>

Come on confused7, what kind of babble is that?
quote
confused7
may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw


Come on confused7, what kind of babble is that?


am sorry buddy
am new to this law school world :(
but i was looking for schools that cld allow two years jd in us other than nw or some llm programs,such as upenn,that cld allow in some exceptional cases students without jd/llb to study llm!!
<blockquote><blockquote>may i plz have nmaes of some us uni which cld offer advance stnading or a 2 years jd .other than nw</blockquote>

Come on confused7, what kind of babble is that?</blockquote>

am sorry buddy
am new to this law school world :(
but i was looking for schools that cld allow two years jd in us other than nw or some llm programs,such as upenn,that cld allow in some exceptional cases students without jd/llb to study llm!!
quote
kamalbir
I am american citizen, but I studied my Law Career in Dominican Republic, which system is Civil Law. I would like to know how are my chances for making a JD Degree in one of the top American Law School. I also would like to know what is exactly the LSAT and if I have to make pass this exam in order for me to enter to a Law School.

hi iam an indian and have studied my law from india. but i want to practise in U.S. does any one knows the procedure.
<blockquote>I am american citizen, but I studied my Law Career in Dominican Republic, which system is Civil Law. I would like to know how are my chances for making a JD Degree in one of the top American Law School. I also would like to know what is exactly the LSAT and if I have to make pass this exam in order for me to enter to a Law School.</blockquote>
hi iam an indian and have studied my law from india. but i want to practise in U.S. does any one knows the procedure.
quote
barmenator

Another important point is with a JD degree and being entitled to seat for any bar, you can always set your own office. Regarding the price, I know that it is more expensive, but you have more chances to get schollarships and financial aid for a JD. Besides, I would not be that sure a JD is necessarily more expensive than a LLM. You have State law schools which fees are far less expensive than any LLM I've seen.
As to job opportunities, I have not much experience yet, but I figure out that a foreign citizen with a JD, good Spanish command, able to seat for any state bar, already admitted in a foreign country bar (as Argentina) and with a broad experience in such foreign jurisdiction could be a really valuable profile for an international law firm in the States.
By the way? does anybody here know -or have an idea- about how difficult would be, or what chances may I have to find a paralegal or any other entry-level job in the States with my current qualifications while studying my JD?


Let's break some myths, if we may:

Graduate education is as expensive in good public schools, than private schools. Berkeley, for instance, is twice the price than most private schools that don't rank in top 15.

An LLM will always be cheaper than a JD. ALWAYS! 1 year vs 3 or 2. It's that simple! Comparing studies in the same school or tier band, that is. An LLM in Harvard is less expensive (we can not say cheap here) than its JD. LLM from NWU is is less expensive tan its JD. Of course, this would not be the case if you are comparing a Harvard LLM to a JD from UF.

It is true there are more loans for JDs than for LLMs, unfortunately, these are only available for american citizens, and PRs, not foreign nationals. On the contrary, foreign nationals have a bigger possibility of getting a grant or loan from their own government for an LLM, than for a JD which would very rarely be sponsored.

To set your own office, you don't need a JD. As you can do so with an LLM.

It is true JD entitles you to sit for bar in all states. But you can only live in one at a time, can't you? Why would you want to have admission in 50 states, if in the end, you'll only settle down in 1?

As to Job opportunities, I don't mean to dissapoint you, but Spanish? Really? Latino community is the #1 minority group in the US. As to foreign experience and studies? Not valid at all in the US. Only domestic experience counts, unless an american company plans to hire you in the US to relocate you as a project/region manager in your country of origin, where such experience and studies would be valid.

Whether we like it or not, there are a set of locks or barriers for entry in this market, designed to protect local jobs from foreign nationals.

If we want to practice in the US, we have to practically start our career from scratch. Otherwise, we might better stay home, where knowledge of English is a true asset, specially when working for MNC.

BTW, no chances of working in the US while studying. Unless you are a citizen or permanent resident. Student visas are only granted for full-time studies.

Don't you guys ever wonder why american lawyers, make 6-figure salaries? Well, because its as simple as supply and demand. Only truly rich people can study 4 years undergrad + 3 JD + 1 LLM of university at $50,000 tuition + $25,000 living expenses.

For the rest of us, there are part-time LLMs, summer LLMs, professional LLMs, part-time JDs, etc. None of which make 6-figure salaries upon graduation, since they are seen by the Legal community as subprime studies.

And if we can't even afford these program's tuition, of course, being a paralegal is THE choice for us. 1 year or less at community college rates with half a lawyer's salary, but at one tenth of the cost. Not bad after all! Is it?
<blockquote>
Another important point is with a JD degree and being entitled to seat for any bar, you can always set your own office. Regarding the price, I know that it is more expensive, but you have more chances to get schollarships and financial aid for a JD. Besides, I would not be that sure a JD is necessarily more expensive than a LLM. You have State law schools which fees are far less expensive than any LLM I've seen.
As to job opportunities, I have not much experience yet, but I figure out that a foreign citizen with a JD, good Spanish command, able to seat for any state bar, already admitted in a foreign country bar (as Argentina) and with a broad experience in such foreign jurisdiction could be a really valuable profile for an international law firm in the States.
By the way? does anybody here know -or have an idea- about how difficult would be, or what chances may I have to find a paralegal or any other entry-level job in the States with my current qualifications while studying my JD?
</blockquote>

Let's break some myths, if we may:

Graduate education is as expensive in good public schools, than private schools. Berkeley, for instance, is twice the price than most private schools that don't rank in top 15.

An LLM will always be cheaper than a JD. ALWAYS! 1 year vs 3 or 2. It's that simple! Comparing studies in the same school or tier band, that is. An LLM in Harvard is less expensive (we can not say cheap here) than its JD. LLM from NWU is is less expensive tan its JD. Of course, this would not be the case if you are comparing a Harvard LLM to a JD from UF.

It is true there are more loans for JDs than for LLMs, unfortunately, these are only available for american citizens, and PRs, not foreign nationals. On the contrary, foreign nationals have a bigger possibility of getting a grant or loan from their own government for an LLM, than for a JD which would very rarely be sponsored.

To set your own office, you don't need a JD. As you can do so with an LLM.

It is true JD entitles you to sit for bar in all states. But you can only live in one at a time, can't you? Why would you want to have admission in 50 states, if in the end, you'll only settle down in 1?

As to Job opportunities, I don't mean to dissapoint you, but Spanish? Really? Latino community is the #1 minority group in the US. As to foreign experience and studies? Not valid at all in the US. Only domestic experience counts, unless an american company plans to hire you in the US to relocate you as a project/region manager in your country of origin, where such experience and studies would be valid.

Whether we like it or not, there are a set of locks or barriers for entry in this market, designed to protect local jobs from foreign nationals.

If we want to practice in the US, we have to practically start our career from scratch. Otherwise, we might better stay home, where knowledge of English is a true asset, specially when working for MNC.

BTW, no chances of working in the US while studying. Unless you are a citizen or permanent resident. Student visas are only granted for full-time studies.

Don't you guys ever wonder why american lawyers, make 6-figure salaries? Well, because its as simple as supply and demand. Only truly rich people can study 4 years undergrad + 3 JD + 1 LLM of university at $50,000 tuition + $25,000 living expenses.

For the rest of us, there are part-time LLMs, summer LLMs, professional LLMs, part-time JDs, etc. None of which make 6-figure salaries upon graduation, since they are seen by the Legal community as subprime studies.

And if we can't even afford these program's tuition, of course, being a paralegal is THE choice for us. 1 year or less at community college rates with half a lawyer's salary, but at one tenth of the cost. Not bad after all! Is it?
quote

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