Oxford BCL/MJur Decision Thread 2011


Cathywei
anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/

Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer
<blockquote>anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/</blockquote>
Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer…
quote
Elizabeta
anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/

Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer


but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....
<blockquote><blockquote>anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/</blockquote>
Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer…</blockquote>

but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....
quote
Elizabeta
anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/

Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer


but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....


@Cathywei, she answered today, hope she did to you too! :)
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/</blockquote>
Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer…</blockquote>

but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....</blockquote>

@Cathywei, she answered today, hope she did to you too! :)
quote
Cathywei
good good,maybe I just need more patience!
anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/

Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer


but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....


@Cathywei, she answered today, hope she did to you too! :)
good good,maybe I just need more patience!
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>anyone been in contact with ms biese recently? she isn't answering my e-mails.... :/</blockquote>
Isn't answering mine either...its kinda wierd cause she always replied so fast. im still waiting for my unconditional offer…</blockquote>

but I suppose we would receive an out of office reply if she's away...?
because my degree certificate was delivered, and no confirmation and unconditional offer from her side....</blockquote>

@Cathywei, she answered today, hope she did to you too! :)</blockquote>
quote
Hi guys!!
I need some help...I would like to take a course in Jurisprudence (i.e. Jurisprudence and Political Theory or Philosophical foundations of common law) and I don't know how to make up my mind! I mean, I have a civil law background and I have never studied Jurisprudence seriously before, so I would be grateful to those who could give me opinions and feedback about these two courses and what knowledge of the subject is presupposed and to what extent if it is...I don't want to embark on courses which are prohibitive to me!
Thanks in advance for your help!!!!!


There is a fair bit of information about these courses on the web, including on Oxford's own pages. Just Google "Oxford BCL" and the names of the courses. But in short, Juris looks at broad issues in the philosophy of law and in political philosophy - the nature of law, justice, authority and so on. Nigel Simmonds' Central Issues in Jurisprudence is a good choice for a general overview, or for original material check out Hart, Dworkin, Rawls, Nozick and Finnis. If you're planning to take the course I'd definitely look at two or three of those (e.g. Simmonds, Hart's Concept of Law and Dworkin's Law's Empire or Taking Rights Seriously) before October.

PFCL is more about the philosophical concepts underpinning the common law. For example, what assumptions about intention are made in contract law or criminal law? What concept of responsibility is at work in tort law, and is it a coherent one? I think on this course if you have a good knowledge of the central areas of the common law and you are used to analysing them critically you will be fine, although some knowledge of general philosophy will definitely be useful. Maybe look at something like 'Responsibility and luck' by Tony Honore.

Disclaimer - I haven't done these courses, will be starting the BCL in October, but will definitely be choosing both of them!
<blockquote>Hi guys!!
I need some help...I would like to take a course in Jurisprudence (i.e. Jurisprudence and Political Theory or Philosophical foundations of common law) and I don't know how to make up my mind! I mean, I have a civil law background and I have never studied Jurisprudence seriously before, so I would be grateful to those who could give me opinions and feedback about these two courses and what knowledge of the subject is presupposed and to what extent if it is...I don't want to embark on courses which are prohibitive to me!
Thanks in advance for your help!!!!!</blockquote>

There is a fair bit of information about these courses on the web, including on Oxford's own pages. Just Google "Oxford BCL" and the names of the courses. But in short, Juris looks at broad issues in the philosophy of law and in political philosophy - the nature of law, justice, authority and so on. Nigel Simmonds' Central Issues in Jurisprudence is a good choice for a general overview, or for original material check out Hart, Dworkin, Rawls, Nozick and Finnis. If you're planning to take the course I'd definitely look at two or three of those (e.g. Simmonds, Hart's Concept of Law and Dworkin's Law's Empire or Taking Rights Seriously) before October.

PFCL is more about the philosophical concepts underpinning the common law. For example, what assumptions about intention are made in contract law or criminal law? What concept of responsibility is at work in tort law, and is it a coherent one? I think on this course if you have a good knowledge of the central areas of the common law and you are used to analysing them critically you will be fine, although some knowledge of general philosophy will definitely be useful. Maybe look at something like 'Responsibility and luck' by Tony Honore.

Disclaimer - I haven't done these courses, will be starting the BCL in October, but will definitely be choosing both of them!
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