GDL+LPC, Training contract for French student


CarltonJ
Hello everybody

I will graduate from a French Law License, which is equivalent to the UK LLB, and I would like to continue my studies in London in order to work there later.
But here is the problem, and I have several questions:
1°) Should I do first an LLM, get the best grades I can and then try to get a training contract with a firm who would pay for my GDL & LPC ?
2°) Or should I apply for a GDL in the first place? In this case, could I still get a training contract?

I really don't know what to do, so thanks for the help ;)
Hello everybody

I will graduate from a French Law License, which is equivalent to the UK LLB, and I would like to continue my studies in London in order to work there later.
But here is the problem, and I have several questions:
1°) Should I do first an LLM, get the best grades I can and then try to get a training contract with a firm who would pay for my GDL & LPC ?
2°) Or should I apply for a GDL in the first place? In this case, could I still get a training contract?

I really don't know what to do, so thanks for the help ;)
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mikado
Don't know much about the training contracts in England but the equivalent to LLB in France is Master 1, not Licence, no?
Don't know much about the training contracts in England but the equivalent to LLB in France is Master 1, not Licence, no?
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CarltonJ
I don't think so. A License is a 3 years law diploma, like the LLB. Anyway, I can apply for both LLM or GDL with a License.
I don't think so. A License is a 3 years law diploma, like the LLB. Anyway, I can apply for both LLM or GDL with a License.
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mikado
C'est un diplome de 3 ans comme le LLB ou comme le JD mais le système anglo-saxon est bien différent. Les étudiants en droit font d'abord un "undergraduate"... Par exemple aux Etats-Unis 4 ans undergraduate puis 3 ans Law School = 7 ans en tout...

Je crois que pour les LLM il faut un Master 1 (diplôme te permettant de passer le barreau).
C'est un diplome de 3 ans comme le LLB ou comme le JD mais le système anglo-saxon est bien différent. Les étudiants en droit font d'abord un "undergraduate"... Par exemple aux Etats-Unis 4 ans undergraduate puis 3 ans Law School = 7 ans en tout...

Je crois que pour les LLM il faut un Master 1 (diplôme te permettant de passer le barreau).
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CarltonJ
I want to apply in UK universities, which is a different system than in US. It's possible to apply for an LLM or GDL after a License. It's written on every entry requirements page, and plus, I have some friends who did this. But it's not the point here.

I would like to know if I should rather do a LLM first (and to know if then, it's easier to get a TC) or just apply for a GDL (and if it's possible to find a TC during this time).
I want to apply in UK universities, which is a different system than in US. It's possible to apply for an LLM or GDL after a License. It's written on every entry requirements page, and plus, I have some friends who did this. But it's not the point here.

I would like to know if I should rather do a LLM first (and to know if then, it's easier to get a TC) or just apply for a GDL (and if it's possible to find a TC during this time).
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Skiia
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I remember LSE website clearly states that in order to apply one should hold a Maîtrise, i.e. the equivalent of 4 prior year of law education.

Anyway, I guess it's really harsh to get a training contract when you are not a graduate from a UK establishment. Especially considering that some "UK-educated" are also trying to get such training contract...

I reckon - but once again, please correct me if I'm wrong - that the LL.M. is not considered as a qualifying degree in the UK and that it's far from being a deal breaker when it comes to being offered a position in a UK law firm (contrary to continental law firms...)
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I remember LSE website clearly states that in order to apply one should hold a Maîtrise, i.e. the equivalent of 4 prior year of law education.

Anyway, I guess it's really harsh to get a training contract when you are not a graduate from a UK establishment. Especially considering that some "UK-educated" are also trying to get such training contract...

I reckon - but once again, please correct me if I'm wrong - that the LL.M. is not considered as a qualifying degree in the UK and that it's far from being a deal breaker when it comes to being offered a position in a UK law firm (contrary to continental law firms...)
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sjd73
I suspect that those doubting whether the licence is enough are correct. I've got a French friend here in Oxford who has finished her undergraduate degree in France and is taking part in an exchange programme for her first masters degree. She is studying on the undergraduate BA Jurisprudence course this year...

The above is correct- an LLM is not a qualifying degree. Would a better approach not be to join a large law firm in France, and transfer across to the London office after a few years?!
I suspect that those doubting whether the licence is enough are correct. I've got a French friend here in Oxford who has finished her undergraduate degree in France and is taking part in an exchange programme for her first masters degree. She is studying on the undergraduate BA Jurisprudence course this year...

The above is correct- an LLM is not a qualifying degree. Would a better approach not be to join a large law firm in France, and transfer across to the London office after a few years?!
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Skiia
I suspect that those doubting whether the licence is enough are correct. I've got a French friend here in Oxford who has finished her undergraduate degree in France and is taking part in an exchange programme for her first masters degree. She is studying on the undergraduate BA Jurisprudence course this year...

The above is correct- an LLM is not a qualifying degree. Would a better approach not be to join a large law firm in France, and transfer across to the London office after a few years?!


From my understanding, that is effectively the correct approach.
Generally, UK law firms are redirectin LLM students towards their continental offices.
I don't really know how it works when one wants to be transfered in another office such as the London one, i.e. is it really doable or not.
I'm curious to hear feedbacks thereon though.
<blockquote>I suspect that those doubting whether the licence is enough are correct. I've got a French friend here in Oxford who has finished her undergraduate degree in France and is taking part in an exchange programme for her first masters degree. She is studying on the undergraduate BA Jurisprudence course this year...

The above is correct- an LLM is not a qualifying degree. Would a better approach not be to join a large law firm in France, and transfer across to the London office after a few years?! </blockquote>

From my understanding, that is effectively the correct approach.
Generally, UK law firms are redirectin LLM students towards their continental offices.
I don't really know how it works when one wants to be transfered in another office such as the London one, i.e. is it really doable or not.
I'm curious to hear feedbacks thereon though.
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