US Class Ranking Percentage Comparison to UK


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When I check the applicant tracker of schools I've applied to, I notice that the admitted candidates usually never fall under top 30% of their class. In the UK LLB we often don't get class rankings (my particular law school didn't), and the grades are not curved. Someone with a 2.1 Honours Degree (3.4 - 3.7 GPA average equivalent) could be anywhere within top 15% to 60% as it's quite a wide classification. So I'm not really sure where I stand unless I know what kind of GPA a person in the top 30%, 20%, 15% and so on would generally get in the US or others that use the system.

Could someone help me understand what kind of grades are required for top 30% in US law schools? Is it Bs? As? Thanks
When I check the applicant tracker of schools I've applied to, I notice that the admitted candidates usually never fall under top 30% of their class. In the UK LLB we often don't get class rankings (my particular law school didn't), and the grades are not curved. Someone with a 2.1 Honours Degree (3.4 - 3.7 GPA average equivalent) could be anywhere within top 15% to 60% as it's quite a wide classification. So I'm not really sure where I stand unless I know what kind of GPA a person in the top 30%, 20%, 15% and so on would generally get in the US or others that use the system.

Could someone help me understand what kind of grades are required for top 30% in US law schools? Is it Bs? As? Thanks
quote
When I check the applicant tracker of schools I've applied to, I notice that the admitted candidates usually never fall under top 30% of their class. In the UK LLB we often don't get class rankings (my particular law school didn't), and the grades are not curved. Someone with a 2.1 Honours Degree (3.4 - 3.7 GPA average equivalent) could be anywhere within top 15% to 60% as it's quite a wide classification. So I'm not really sure where I stand unless I know what kind of GPA a person in the top 30%, 20%, 15% and so on would generally get in the US or others that use the system.

Could someone help me understand what kind of grades are required for top 30% in US law schools? Is it Bs? As? Thanks


I believe it depends on your University and country of origin and not on your grades itself. For instance, in my country grades tend to be low because professors are seriously not used to grade their students with As. In other words, it's really hard to get an A on some course. Therefore, I think that Admissions committees know who has excellent transcripts and who doesn't
Regards!
<blockquote>When I check the applicant tracker of schools I've applied to, I notice that the admitted candidates usually never fall under top 30% of their class. In the UK LLB we often don't get class rankings (my particular law school didn't), and the grades are not curved. Someone with a 2.1 Honours Degree (3.4 - 3.7 GPA average equivalent) could be anywhere within top 15% to 60% as it's quite a wide classification. So I'm not really sure where I stand unless I know what kind of GPA a person in the top 30%, 20%, 15% and so on would generally get in the US or others that use the system.

Could someone help me understand what kind of grades are required for top 30% in US law schools? Is it Bs? As? Thanks</blockquote>

I believe it depends on your University and country of origin and not on your grades itself. For instance, in my country grades tend to be low because professors are seriously not used to grade their students with As. In other words, it's really hard to get an A on some course. Therefore, I think that Admissions committees know who has excellent transcripts and who doesn't
Regards!
quote

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