LLM in Canada


I will be completing my Bachelor's degree in Law from India.
I further want to pursue my LLM from Canada with the intention of getting a permanent Canadian PR.

So can Someone suggest in which field shall I do my LLM in Canada and from which Univesity?

And further what would be the procedure to Practise law in Canada?

I will be completing my Bachelor's degree in Law from India.
I further want to pursue my LLM from Canada with the intention of getting a permanent Canadian PR.

So can Someone suggest in which field shall I do my LLM in Canada and from which Univesity?

And further what would be the procedure to Practise law in Canada?
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Karllex

Following. Even I wanna know.

Following. Even I wanna know.
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poohbear

I believe you have to take the NCA exams in order to be qualified to take the bar exam in the province where you want to practice. You then have to write and pass the bar exam, then do an articling position at a firm or court in order to get your license (length depends on province). I would google NCA and see what they say on their website, or on the law society website of your province of choice. I don't have experience with this, as I did law school in Canada but this is what I have heard. :) What I can tell you for sure is that it's not the same for each province, so do your homework on the province rather than Canada as a whole (e.g., focus on Ontario, Qc, BC, etc)...

In terms of schools, it depends on (1) where you want to live and practice, and (2) what you want to focus on in terms of course selection/practice area. In terms of prestige, McGill and U of T are generally considered the top in Canada, followed by Osgoode Hall, Queens, and UBC. Though, the rankings change each year so it could be different. McGill and U of T place well for corporate law and international positions, not too sure about other areas.

This is all I know - hope it helps somewhat!

I believe you have to take the NCA exams in order to be qualified to take the bar exam in the province where you want to practice. You then have to write and pass the bar exam, then do an articling position at a firm or court in order to get your license (length depends on province). I would google NCA and see what they say on their website, or on the law society website of your province of choice. I don't have experience with this, as I did law school in Canada but this is what I have heard. :) What I can tell you for sure is that it's not the same for each province, so do your homework on the province rather than Canada as a whole (e.g., focus on Ontario, Qc, BC, etc)...<br><br>In terms of schools, it depends on (1) where you want to live and practice, and (2) what you want to focus on in terms of course selection/practice area. In terms of prestige, McGill and U of T are generally considered the top in Canada, followed by Osgoode Hall, Queens, and UBC. Though, the rankings change each year so it could be different. McGill and U of T place well for corporate law and international positions, not too sure about other areas.<br><br>This is all I know - hope it helps somewhat!
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chicken so...

The above is pretty accurate but research provincial requirements, which can vary. 

There's been quite a bit of discussion on this over the years - I suggest you do a bit of background reading. For example:

https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/practising-law-in-canada-49526

https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/work-opportunity-in-canada-after-llm-194725

https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/lawyer-immigration-to-canada-89979

The short story is that an LLM may not help you very much, and most law schools will dissuade you from this if you are trying to use an LLM to transition to practicing in Canada. As with most other countries around the world, it's exceedingly difficult to start practicing if you have studied elsewhere, and for this reason the LLM is not a good enabler of international mobility (compared to an MBA for example).

Typically, law firms in Canada have recruiting funnels set up through the Canadian JD programs, and have more than enough choice already. Coming into the job market with knowledge of an entirely different jurisdiction does not help very much. 

The above is pretty accurate but research provincial requirements, which can vary.&nbsp;<br><br>There's been quite a bit of discussion on this over the years - I suggest you do a bit of background reading. For example:<br><br>https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/practising-law-in-canada-49526<br><br>https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/work-opportunity-in-canada-after-llm-194725<br><br>https://llm-guide.com/board/canada/lawyer-immigration-to-canada-89979<br><br>The short story is that an LLM may not help you very much, and most law schools will dissuade you from this if you are trying to use an LLM to transition to practicing in Canada. As with most other countries around the world, it's exceedingly difficult to start practicing if you have studied elsewhere, and for this reason the LLM is not a good enabler of international mobility (compared to an MBA for example).<br><br>Typically, law firms in Canada have recruiting funnels set up through the Canadian JD programs, and have more than enough choice already. Coming into the job market with knowledge of an entirely different jurisdiction does not help very much.&nbsp;
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