Admission criteria/entry requirements


Ludvig
Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programmes, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you!
Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programmes, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you!
quote
Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programmes, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you!


As far as I know, it is the case in many countries, not only Norway. In my opinion you can still apply for an LLM anywhere after you graduate
[quote]Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programmes, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you![/quote]

As far as I know, it is the case in many countries, not only Norway. In my opinion you can still apply for an LLM anywhere after you graduate
quote
JPeleo
Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programs, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you!


Hey Ludvig,

You shouldn't be worrying about this. Graduating from a 5-year integrated undergraduate and graduate program (LLB/LLM; BA/MA in law) can only work in your favor. Schools are aware of different systems of legal education, and your diploma supplement will indicate which degree is required in your jurisdictions to be admitted to legal practice. Also, rest assure that each of the schools you are considering applying to has already had a significant number of applicants from Norway so your LLM degree will not raise any eyebrows in the admissions committee. I have an integrated master's and got into several of the best schools in the US. There are quite a few people here from mainly EU countries offering only integrated programs. Neither should you be worrying about not having grades on your transcripts (I know that several Nordic countries do not have grading systems but their applicants are still highly competitive).

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Best!

[Edited by JPeleo on Apr 12, 2017]

[quote]Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programs, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you![/quote]

Hey Ludvig,

You shouldn't be worrying about this. Graduating from a 5-year integrated undergraduate and graduate program (LLB/LLM; BA/MA in law) can only work in your favor. Schools are aware of different systems of legal education, and your diploma supplement will indicate which degree is required in your jurisdictions to be admitted to legal practice. Also, rest assure that each of the schools you are considering applying to has already had a significant number of applicants from Norway so your LLM degree will not raise any eyebrows in the admissions committee. I have an integrated master's and got into several of the best schools in the US. There are quite a few people here from mainly EU countries offering only integrated programs. Neither should you be worrying about not having grades on your transcripts (I know that several Nordic countries do not have grading systems but their applicants are still highly competitive).

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Best!
quote
Ludvig
Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programs, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you!


Hey Ludvig,

You shouldn't be worrying about this. Graduating from a 5-year integrated undergraduate and graduate program (LLB/LLM; BA/MA in law) can only work in your favor. Schools are aware of different systems of legal education, and your diploma supplement will indicate which degree is required in your jurisdictions to be admitted to legal practice. Also, rest assure that each of the schools you are considering applying to has already had a significant number of applicants from Norway so your LLM degree will not raise any eyebrows in the admissions committee. I have an integrated master's and got into several of the best schools in the US. There are quite a few people here from mainly EU countries offering only integrated programs. Neither should you be worrying about not having grades on your transcripts (I know that several Nordic countries do not have grading systems but their applicants are still highly competitive).

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Best!


Thank you JPeleo,

I might have expressed myself in the wrong way. I am aware that a completed five-year integrated masters degree would be sufficient to apply for a LL.M program. What i failed to mention is the possibility to apply _before_ completing my masters degree: in other words, applying after completing four out of five years. My hope is that i can spend my fifth and final year of my degree abroad taking a LL.M course, and after this having both a LL.M degree as well as a completed masters degree from my home Uni.

In this case, I would not have a formal degree at all to show for when applying to grad schools abroad. I have been i contact with several universities in both the US and Europe. Some are familiar with the situation and would consider my application as long as I provide a statement from my home Uni confirming that I have successfully completed four years of law studies. Others, especially in the US, are more strict and demand a formal degree.
[quote][quote]Hi guys,

I am currently doing some research on different law schools that offer LL.M programs, and I have a question regarding the entry requirements. All schools I have looked at require a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B or something corresponding to that).

However, the law schools in my home country Norway only offer an integrated master´s degree of five years, which, in the end, will include both a LL.B and a LL.M. In other words, there is no "separate" bachelor´s degree after accomplishing the first three or four years.

My problem is therefore that I do not meet the admission criteria to schools outside of Norway since i formally do not have a bachelor´s degree, although I am now on my fourth year of law studies and in reality have a bachelor´s degree. Does anyone know about a school where they will consider me as an applicant despite this formal obstacle? If so, my university will approve a LL.M degree from another school abroad as my fifth and final year of my master´s degree here in Oslo as well.

Thank you![/quote]

Hey Ludvig,

You shouldn't be worrying about this. Graduating from a 5-year integrated undergraduate and graduate program (LLB/LLM; BA/MA in law) can only work in your favor. Schools are aware of different systems of legal education, and your diploma supplement will indicate which degree is required in your jurisdictions to be admitted to legal practice. Also, rest assure that each of the schools you are considering applying to has already had a significant number of applicants from Norway so your LLM degree will not raise any eyebrows in the admissions committee. I have an integrated master's and got into several of the best schools in the US. There are quite a few people here from mainly EU countries offering only integrated programs. Neither should you be worrying about not having grades on your transcripts (I know that several Nordic countries do not have grading systems but their applicants are still highly competitive).

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Best![/quote]

Thank you JPeleo,

I might have expressed myself in the wrong way. I am aware that a completed five-year integrated masters degree would be sufficient to apply for a LL.M program. What i failed to mention is the possibility to apply _before_ completing my masters degree: in other words, applying after completing four out of five years. My hope is that i can spend my fifth and final year of my degree abroad taking a LL.M course, and after this having both a LL.M degree as well as a completed masters degree from my home Uni.

In this case, I would not have a formal degree at all to show for when applying to grad schools abroad. I have been i contact with several universities in both the US and Europe. Some are familiar with the situation and would consider my application as long as I provide a statement from my home Uni confirming that I have successfully completed four years of law studies. Others, especially in the US, are more strict and demand a formal degree.
quote

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